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    Default Moving from base/forecourt backhand area position to the forehand rearcourt area

    This question was asked from another thread Practice footwork! But how to apply it?

    There are a couple of stroke moves depending on the situation. All descriptions for righthanders

    Let's take the situation moving from the base to the forehand rearcourt area taking an overhead stroke to play an overhead clear.


    base position: have your ready position with your feet astride but your right foot slightly forward.

    do the little hop, both feet must land on the ground simultaneously

    step back with right foot turning the bodysideways, and bring up arms to the bow-and-arrow position.

    do the sidestep movement to the corner. Probably needs two sidesteps.

    Play a defensive clear with the body/hip/feet rotation. Your right and left foot should be almost in a line perpendicular to the net after playing the stroke, the right foot being closer to the net.

    walk back to the base using left first then right leg. (no need to run - you played a high clear so have plenty of time)

    now hop to the base position with your feet landing simultaneously. Your feet should now be the same position as when first starting the movement.



    We call this the 3 step movement. ie to get to the corner, we needed to move our legs three steps, then to get back to base, we needed to move 3 steps.

    Note that this is to play a high clear form a high clear. This is the most basic movement. Other footwork to cope with attack clears by leaping sideways or playing defensive forecourt returns are different and need to be addressed later.

    If you think this basic movement is boring, I spent nearly two months of two sessions a week, two hours a session doing this movement, plus making my work colleagues think I was mad doing funny steps at work. I was learning the other rear court movement and forecourt movement as well. But it was all very boring and unspectacular.
    Tell you what though, it's really very tiring and actually builds up stamina. Our youth training scheme in HK for badminton actually spend the first 40 minutes of a two hour session just doing stretching and footwork exercises such as this.
    Last edited by Cheung; 08-11-2003 at 04:46 AM.

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    That's the kind of stuff I had to run through with my coach. Mind you , once you do enough of these drills the actucal game seems quite easy to manage in comparison He also taught me quite a few variations on this. 2 step movement is what singles Pro's use but actually exectuing that is amazingly difficult.
    Last edited by UkPlayer; 08-12-2003 at 01:54 PM.

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    Default For righthanders

    This variation is quite common.

    sometimes you will see players leap up very fast to their forehand corner to cut off a lowish clear and bang the shuttle down.

    Her's the footwork pattern.

    Go back to our base position - right foot slightly forward.

    Mantally calculate - is this clear a bit low? If yes, then follow the next steps.

    Right foot back, turn body so it faces out to the side.

    sidestep quickly (may need one or two steps)

    Jump up (still facing to the side) withdrawing the racquet at the same time.

    Suspend in midair and do a quick half smash down the line.

    Land with your body still facing the sidelines - both feet should be on a line towards the deep forehand corner.

    Make sure when you land, you end up in almost a crouched position - that really helps the recovery step.

    recovery step depends on how deep you are in the court
    if the shuttle you hit was 3/4 length court interception - you do one side shuffle (like a crab) towards the middle of the court
    if te shuttle was lifted deep and you did this movement, you'll have to jump towards the middle and switch you feet around so that the right foot now is towards the netand the left foot behind.

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    about the side stepping. do the legs move indepedently, ie. R-L-R, or is it more of a hop of two legs together, ie RL-RL ?

    still find this footwork rather awkward, especially trying to connect the final step with body rotation.

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    The side step is R-L-R ie. sequentially.


    For the 2nd variation,

    the speed of the feet must be fast ie. quick sidesteps since the shuttle is on a lower trajectory.

    A problem I have seen is sidestepping with the last sidestep being much larger. Should actually take an extra sidestep to make up the distance.

    The jump up must not include too much horizontal movement to the side of the court. If you feel like you are flying out of the court, you will be losing the initiative. The horizontal movement to hit the shuttle comes from the sidestepping, the jump should be more vertical than horizontal, and the aim is to strike the shuttle before it has gone past behind you. This way, it is easier to play drop, half smash, smash, crosscourts. Let the shuttle go behind and the options to play downward shots are fewer.

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    I find that this picture illustrates the mid base to left back footwork very well.
    Last edited by Carbonexer; 09-27-2003 at 11:06 PM.

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    Default Re: For righthanders

    Originally posted by Cheung
    Land with your body still facing the sidelines - both feet should be on a line towards the deep forehand corner.
    Why wouldn't you rotate the body with the swing so you end up facing the net?

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    Basically, if the shuttle is on a lower trajectory, you wouldn't have the time to be able to cover the distance, get into position, and then rotate the body.

    The body rotation is definately the shot to make if you do have time. e.g. oppnent has very high clears, or maybe after serve.

    if the opponent plays a lift off the net, or an attack clear which has a lower trajectory, using a quick sidestep movement, leaping up, and producing the half smash with a short movement can often give you a lot of advantage.

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    Originally posted by Carbonexer
    I find that this picture illustrates the mid base to left back footwork very well.
    Unfortunately, the guy is moving to the backhand side. This thread is about moving to the forehand side. However, that link does illustrate the flying step movement quite clearly.

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    Carbonexer, thanks for that link. I found an example where Xia Xuan Ze does not rotate his body.


    http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/%7Ezt8s-o...mintonshot.htm

    Unfortuantely, he doesn't do the side ssteps, but if you imagine the shuttle was even further out to the side, he probably would need to sidestep to make up some distance.

    Very clearly, Xia does not rotate his body when and after hitting the shuttle.

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    Cheung. I can't tell which one you were referring to. That shortcut you posted is not linked to any specific video. You have to right click on that particular picture and choose "Save shortcut" and then paste it in your message. Thanks.

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    which video is it on that page Cheung ?

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    Sorry, my apologies.

    click on "yonex JO, last rally 2"

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    For the orginal description I gave on the 1st post about sidestepping to the corner, click on the "footwork 3'. Notice in that demo, the player is not at the baseline. I think if the shuttle was played any deeper, or the base is furher forward, then the player would need to do another sidestep to make up the distance.

    Aren't these the clips that Steplantis referred to in another thread? They certainly are very good.

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    Cheung, can you go into more detail on the jumping and landing.
    Are they 1 foot jumps (which foot) or 2 foot jumps.
    Are they 1 foot landings (which foot) or 2 foot landings.


    In the first case of high clear to high clear, it should be a vertical jump using 2 feet, starting with right foot back and left foot front, rotating to land on 2 feet with left foot back and right foot front.

    In the second case, I would say it is a diagonal jump, jumping from the right foot, no rotation, landing on 2 feet with left foot front and right foot back. But I would say there is horizontal movement while you are in the air. If you have time to move under the shuttle before you jump, and then do a vertical jump, you should be able to rotate.


    If in the first case you do not play a high clear, but say, a drop-shot, you would have less time to get back to base. So after your jump and rotation, you might land 1 footed (left foot) with your weight moving forwards already.

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    Originally posted by Neil Nicholls
    Cheung, can you go into more detail on the jumping and landing.
    Are they 1 foot jumps (which foot) or 2 foot jumps.
    Are they 1 foot landings (which foot) or 2 foot landings.


    In the first case of high clear to high clear, it should be a vertical jump using 2 feet, starting with right foot back and left foot front, rotating to land on 2 feet with left foot back and right foot front.
    Yes, those are the foot positionings. After rotation the feet do not land simultaneously but sequentially.

    If in the first case you do not play a high clear, but say, a drop-shot, you would have less time to get back to base. So after your jump and rotation, you might land 1 footed (left foot) with your weight moving forwards already.
    I think one should be doing this for both strokes, ie. high clear and drop shot, with the right foot landing after the left leg. It is the next step to cover the opponents options that are different.


    In the second case, I would say it is a diagonal jump, jumping from the right foot, no rotation, landing on 2 feet with left foot front and right foot back. But I would say there is horizontal movement while you are in the air. If you have time to move under the shuttle before you jump, and then do a vertical jump, you should be able to rotate.
    yes, I agree. I did mention that this footwork for the 2nd case was for lower clears.

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