User Tag List

Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast
Results 52 to 68 of 208
  1. #52
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Taskforce to improve Badminton


    By May Chen

    The Straits Times
    Monday, Jul 15, 2013


    The Singapore Badminton Association (SBA) will engage stakeholders from both within and outside the association to help improve local shuttlers' winning chances.

    SBA chief Lee Yi Shyan will head the taskforce, which is expected to start coming up with recommendations for the sport within the next two months.

    Past members of the SBA's executive committee, local coaches and even parents of current players will be consulted as part of the process.

    "We want to consult people who have ideas and who want to tell us what we can do," said Mr Lee, who is also Senior Minister of State for National Development, and Trade and Industry.

    "I hope that this consultation will help us to bring together new ideas as to what we should do to bring up the standard.

    "It's an important review because we've always operated on the basis of certain constraints. The time now is to challenge ourselves - whether some of these constraints can be removed."

    The taskforce will spend the next year examining various aspects of the national team's training methodology. It will also look at how to help the association deal with issues like a limited budget and supply of talent.

    Executing the recommendations and for them to start bearing fruit, however, will take a longer time, Mr Lee reminded.

    This comes after he promised an internal review after the local shuttlers' disappointing outing at the Li-Ning Singapore Open last month.

    Then, despite fielding a team of 23 in the home event, no Singaporean made the quarter-final stage, making it the country's worst showing since the 2006 edition.

    High hopes had been held for women's singles Gu Juan in particular, after the world No. 20 beat world No. 3 Saina Nehwal of India just weeks earlier.

    Xing Aiying, ranked 55th, had also made it into the last four of the women's singles last year.

    Both crashed out in the first round.

    The nation's singles players have also struggled to make it past the last 16 in any Superseries-level (second tier) or Grand Prix Gold (third tier) tournaments since the year began.

    Gu's runner-up finish at the Malaysia Open Grand Prix Gold in June was the only exception.

    Said Mr Lee: "Once we have gathered all these (ideas) and we look through our system, we can set higher standards and improve the organisation.

    "(What we want) in the end is to empower our players to do their best on court."

  2. #53
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default 'Important review' of SBA's processes coming up

    ASIAONE
    NEWS
    SPORTS




    By Lim Say Heng
    The New Paper
    Tuesday, Jul 16, 2013


    SINGAPORE - An "important review" of the way Singapore Badminton Association (SBA) operates its high-performance structure will commence in September this year.

    The taskforce, headed by SBA president Lee Yi Shyan, will seek the views of the local badminton fraternity, such as non-SBA coaches, sponsors, parents and former executive committee members, on how to improve both the current national team and the talent development pathway.

    Mr Lee, who is the Senior Minister of State for Trade and Industry, said this at the Li-Ning Singapore Open appreciation dinner last night at the Chinese Swimming Club.

    The issue came to the fore after last month's Badminton World Federation SuperSeries tournament, where no Singaporean made the quarter-final stage of the tournament, the Republic's worst showing since at least the 2006 edition.

    Mr Lee promised a "serious review" after the tournament, and The New Paper also spoke to several people in the fraternity, who said some local shuttlers lack discipline and ambition.

    Said Mr Lee: "We are in the process of forming a taskforce and the purpose of this taskforce is to look at the various aspects of the national team's training methodology, and internal processes in terms of communications and management of players.

    "We will give ourselves one year (for the review), bearing in mind that we are about to start our preparations for next year's Singapore Open because it's been brought forward to April. There are many parts which SBA has got to piece together."

    Constraints

    Asked if it would be a fine-tuning or major rethink of the SBA's processes, Mr Lee cited constraints in budget, number of talent and avenues for overseas stints.

    He then said: "It's an important review, whether it's big or small really depends on whether in the end we can lift some of these constraints."


    But he did warn that the implementation of some of the ideas will take some time, especially when it comes to beefing up the national squad and changing the mindset of talented young shuttlers to give elite badminton a shot.

    Addressing comments on the players' motivation, Mr Lee said: "In terms of financial incentives, our players can be paid monthly between $1,200 and about $3,000, but they can be paid as much as $200,000 a year if they achieve improvements in world rankings and win tournaments."

    He qualified the last figure by saying it includes internal incentives, sponsors' rewards and special funding for major Games such as the Olympics.

    He added: "Players who don't perform will continue to receive the basic salary... but whether financial incentive alone is enough, or whether there can be better motivation through counselling and coaching, these are things we have to look into."

  3. #54
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Shuttler Derek Wong out of dad's shadow

    By Eve Yap
    The Sunday Times
    Tuesday, Jul 16, 2013


    SINGAPORE - Badminton coach Wong Shoon Keat is in a quandary: Does he let the youngest of his four sons pursue badminton full-time next year?

    "Jason's coaches say he has fire and can develop into a good doubles or mixed doubles player," says Mr Wong of the 16-year-old, who is in the national intermediate squad.

    But he does not want history to repeat itself. His second son Derek trained full-time with the Singapore Badminton Association after his O levels but lost momentum when he enlisted in national service.

    "My number one regret is that Derek didn't get a deferment for national service. If I had known that would be the case, I would have asked him to continue with his studies," says Mr Wong, 56, who was Singapore's last South-east Asian Games men's singles champion back in 1983.

    When Derek returned to badminton full-time at 19, it was "difficult for him to make up for the lost time", says his father.

    Derek, currently Singapore's No. 1 player and the world's No. 51, says he trained at a "60 per cent" pace while serving in the Singapore Police Force. "You lose the momentum."

    The 24-year-old and the other local male singles shuttlers lost their matches during the Li-Ning Singapore Open qualifiers last month.

    His mother Irene Lee, 54, also a badminton coach, says: "It would be ideal if they could defer national service during the best years of their life. But as long as my boys love the game, I will support them if they want to go full-time."

    The Wong family - including eldest son Shawn, 27, a badminton coach, and third son Jamie, 19, a national serviceman - live in an HDB executive maisonette in Serangoon.

    What was Derek like as a child?

    Mr Wong: He was often mistaken by his teammates in the association's junior team as cocky.

    Ms Lee: He was on the quiet side, like Jamie. But the other two boys are chatty, like me.
    Derek: I remember I just wanted to play badminton. I wasn't interested in other things.

    Mr Wong, did you nudge your sons into becoming badminton players?

    Mr Wong: We used to own a shop in the old Singapore Badminton Hall in Guillemard Road, selling badminton equipment. It was the frequent hangout for Derek and his brothers. That's probably how they learnt to love the sport after being surrounded by it in their growing-up years.

    How high were your expectations of Derek?

    Mr Wong: If he didn't play to the No. 1 or No. 2 standard which he was capable of for his age group, I scolded him.

    Derek: I understood his point. I also felt disappointed if I didn't do my best.

    Ms Lee: I didn't want to say too much because the daddy would already have made the comments. I might point out, say, a drop shot.

    Derek, do you ever feel like you are in the shadow of your father?

    Derek: I did during secondary school because I wasn't up to standard, not having played or won any big matches. But my game is more mature now and I've grown out of feeling inferior.

    Mr Wong: He won against Taufik Hidayat, the former Olympic and world champion, in the 2011 World Badminton Championships. I'm also proud that he represented Singapore in the Olympics last year.

    Who was stricter, mum or dad?

    Mr Wong: My wife is very strict in getting the kids to greet all the uncles and aunties every time they meet.

    Ms Lee: I remind them to do so, even till now. We are Chinese, that's our custom and that's how my parents taught me to show respect for my elders.

    Did you cane your sons?

    Derek: When I was in lower primary in Catholic High School (Primary), I'd watch TV the whole day after coming back from school.

    Mr Wong: We worked till 10pm daily at our shop.

    Ms Lee: When we came home to find they hadn't done their homework, it was frustrating. So they got caned.

    Derek: My brothers and I also fought about anything and everything.

    Ms Lee: I nudge you, you irritate me - that sort of thing. I didn't like them fighting. The one who argued about who started the fight got more strokes.

    Derek: Though mum is the strict one, I had to watch that I didn't get on my dad's nerves. I was a show-off when I was eight. In one practice session, I made my opponent run around the court while I sat on it.

    Mr Wong: I don't remember the incident.

    Derek: He gave me a tongue-lashing. It was a small incident but a big deal to me - I learnt to respect my opponents after that.

    If the parent-child roles were reversed, what would you do differently?

    Mr Wong: If I were Derek, I would not have given up studying to play full-time. There aren't enough good players here to compete against and push him and others to the next level.

    Ms Lee: I would still take up badminton full-time after my O levels.

    Derek: I would encourage my child to pursue a career in sports if I thought he had the talent.



    From left: Irene Lee, 54, Wong Shoon Keat, 56, Jason Wong, 15, and Derek Wong, 24.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  4. #55
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Teenage shuttler Citra sets sights on Olympics

    By Fabius Chen
    The Straits Times
    Saturday, Jul 20, 2013


    SINGAPORE - At first glance, Citra Putri appears to be your average secondary school student.

    A string of colourful beads that spell her name hanging off her backpack, she even considers a South Korean heartthrob as her idol, just like many starry-eyed Singapore teenagers.

    But then she speaks of a desire to play badminton in the Olympics. "It's been my dream for a long time," she says.

    As she turns around, the word "Sari" comes into view. Emblazoned across the back of her jersey, the family name serves as a reminder of the weight of expectation on her young shoulders.

    The 17-year-old does have some way to go to follow the footsteps of elder sister Shinta Mulia Sari, who played in last summer's London Games, and big brothers Hendri Kurniawan Saputra and Hendra Wijaya, the men's doubles bronze medallists at the 2010 Commonwealth Games.

    Still, Citra took a step in the right direction last month, when she teamed with Anglican High School's Liang Yun to clinch the women's doubles gold at the Asean Schools Games in Hanoi.

    She failed to retain her mixed doubles won with Terry Hee from the Singapore Sports School last year, finishing third in the competition (with Bimo Adi Prakoso from Montfort Secondary) as well as in the women's team event.

    Her efforts contributed to Singapore's overall haul of eight golds, five silvers and 15 bronzes.



    In all, the Republic's shuttlers returned with four medals (one gold, three bronzes), while basketball (one bronze), gymnastics (three golds, two silvers), swimming (two golds, one silver, three bronzes), table tennis (two golds, one silver, six bronzes) and athletics (one silver, two bronzes) also had fruitful outings.

    For Citra, a Secondary 4 student at Paya Lebar Methodist Girls' School who idolises South Korea shuttler Lee Yong Dae "because I like his face", it was another milestone in a sporting journey that began in Jakarta at age six.

    Citra is the eighth of nine children in a family whose bonds were built by spending countless hours on the badminton court. Since moving to Singapore in 2009, the teenager has found her inspiration in Shinta, as well as Hendri and Hendra - both of whom now run their own badminton school.

    "Once or twice a week, my sister and I train at our brothers' academy," she said. "If there's time, we have dinner and talk about school and family."

    Inevitably, Shinta, 25, has some words of wisdom for her baby sister: "Train hard and work towards your goals."

    Indeed, all signs point to the possibility that a fourth member of the Sari family could soon be donning Singapore colours.

    "We are tracking her progress," said Chua Yong Joo, the Singapore Badminton Association's senior technical manager.

    Until then, Citra will have to content herself with being a dead ringer for her more recognisable elder sister.

    "Many times, people have asked to take photos with me because they think I'm Shinta," she revealed shyly. "I don't like it... sometimes they ask for my number and I just run away.



    "With the family name Sari on her jersey, Citra Putri is expected to follow her sister and two brothers into the Singapore badminton team.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  5. #56
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Urgent need to overhaul Singapore badminton

    (The following article is a bit old but still relevant in view of the proposed action to be taken by SBA.)


    The New Paper
    Thursday, Jun 27, 2013


    SINGAPORE - She was the toast of the nation when she clinched the Republic's first gold medal in the women's singles badminton event at the 2011 South-east Asia (SEA) Games in Indonesia.

    A little over 18 months later, Fu Mingtian is now playing doubles. She says she has lost interest playing singles.

    She partnered Shinta Mulia Sari at this year's Li-Ning Singapore Open and failed to even make it past the qualifying round. She partnered Terry Hee in the mixed doubles and also failed to make it past the first round.

    The hosts featured a team of 23 shuttlers in this year's tournament and only the mixed doubles pair of Terry Yeo and Yao Lei got out of the first round, only to come unstuck in the second.

    Singapore badminton has been in the doldrums for some time now. Singapore Badminton Association (SBA) president Lee Yi Shyan's comments in Monday's Straits Times of a major internal review is long overdue.

    The sport has a long and proud tradition in Singapore
    . The healthy turnout at the Singapore Indoor Stadium over the course of the Singapore Open last week - Sunday's final was witnessed by 8,500 fans - is an indication of the interest in the country.

    Yet, despite such support, and the fact that the national sports association has long been one of the best-funded by the Singapore Sports Council in the country, the SBA has floundered.

    Mr Lee, who is the Senior Minister of State for National Development, and Trade and Industry, vowed he and his team will re-examine various strategies of the SBA.

    Over the last few months, the Football Association of Singapore has sent a couple of youngsters on attachments to Europe. Talented youngster Mahathir Azeman is in Brazil.

    The Singapore Table Tennis Association ensure their paddlers play, train and spar abroad in world-class environments like Japan and, of course, China.
    It is time the SBA adopts the same strategy for its talented youngsters. Surely the association's Chinese singles coach, Luan Ching, can form the link.

    In a sport where Asia dominates, the SBA does not have to look far to tap on expertise and world-class playing grounds to improve its shuttlers.

    Perhaps the SBA's new strategy could see its major focus turn to the development of its younger shuttlers.

    That may be radical, but there must be a new blueprint, if Singapore badminton aims to develop shuttlers who consistently make their mark on the world stage.

    There have been one-offs.

    Like Gu Juan's shock progress to the last eight of the All-England Championships in 2011.

    Like Yao and Shinta's victory in the women's doubles at the 2010 Singapore Open.

    No momentum

    But the shuttlers and the SBA have failed to work together to sustain any sort of momentum.

    Not since Ronald Susilo's feats - he was the world No. 6 at one point and beat China's Lin Dan at the 2004 Athens Olympics, when he reached the quarter-finals - in the first half of the new millennium has Singapore badminton enjoyed any kind of success on a consistent basis at the elite level.

    The SBA must develop a sounder strategy to grow its funds. The long-term goal must include developing world-class local coaches.

    Badminton chief Mr Lee, who became SBA president in 2008, said in 2010 that the target was for the men's and women's teams to qualify for the 2015 Thomas Cup and Uber Cup finals, respectively.

    The top 12 nations in the world do battle in the elite men's and women's team competitions, respectively, and right now, Singapore are well behind.

    I don't think even a major overhaul by the SBA will narrow the gap at this juncture, but at least it's a start.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #57
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Derek scores upset victory at World Championships

    By Low Lin Fhoong
    POSTED: 06 Aug 2013 6:22 AM


    SINGAPORE: Shuttler Derek Wong has claimed a major scalp at the Badminton World Federation (BWF) World Championships in Guangzhou after posting a 24-22, 21-16 first round victory over Indonesia's Sony Dwi Kuncoro, who is seeded tenth for the men's singles.

    Both players had only met once at the Malaysian Open Grand Prix Gold in 2011, with world No 10 Sony - a bronze medallist at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games - claiming victory, 21-18, 21-18, two years ago.

    But a first round match-up at the world championships saw a lower-ranked Wong (No 52) upsetting the form books on Monday evening to claim a hard-fought 2-0 win over the three-time Asian champion (2002, 2003, 2005).

    Wong will face Malaysia's Daren Liew in the second round on Tuesday in his bid to qualify for the round of 16.

    Teammate Ashton Chen found his world championships campaign halted in the first round after a 2-1 (16-21, 21-11, 21-13) loss to Takuma Ueda of Japan.

    All-England quarter-finalist (2011) Gu Juan will come up against Lithuania's Akvile Stapusaityte in the first round of the women's singles on Tuesday, while 14th seeded mixed doubles pair Danny Bawa Chrisnanta and Vanessa Neo will face South Koreans Baek Choel Shin and Hye Won Eom after earning a bye into the second round.

    The much anticipated clash between reigning Olympic champion Lin Dan (China) and Malaysian world No 1 Lee Chong Wei remained on track on Monday with both shuttlers defeating their respective first round opponents, Thailand's Sattawat Pongnairat (2-0) and Scott Evans of Ireland (2-0).

    Lin Dan will meet Eric Pang of the Netherlands in the next round, while Lee will face Indonesia's Dionysius Hayom Rumbaka in his bid to capture his first world championship title.
    Men's singles first round results:

    Lin Dan (CHN) bt Sattawat Pongnairat (USA) 21-6 21-9
    Lee Chong Wei (MAS) bt Scott Evans (IRL) 21-11, 21-15
    Chen Long (CHN) bt Luka Wraber (AUT) 21-2, 21-5
    Du Pengyu (CHN) bt Shon Wan-Ho (KOR) 21-17, 16-21, 21-13
    Boonsak Ponsana (THA) bt Matthieu Lo Ying Ping (FRA) 21-13, 21-12
    Hu Yun(HKG) bt Niluka Karunaratne (SRI) 21-13, 21-16

    Nguyen Tien Minh (VIE) bt Joe Wu (NZL) 21-8, 21-11
    Tommy Sugiarto (INA) bt Hans-Kristian Vittinghus (DEN) 21-18 15-21 21-17
    Jan O Jorgensen (DEN) bt Lee Dong-Keun (KOR) 21-16 17-21 21-15
    Derek Wong Zi Liang (SIN) bt Sony Dwi Kuncoro (INA) 24-22 21-16
    Marc Zweibler (GER) bt Valeriy Atrashchenkov (UKR) 21-15, 18-21, 21-14

    Ajay Jayaram (IND) bt Wing Ki Wong (HKG) 22-20, 17-21, 21-15
    Parupalli Kashyap (IND) bt Raul Must (EST) 19-21, 21-14, 21-9
    Wang Zhengming (CHN) bt Yuhan Tan (BEL) 21-17, 21-14
    Chong Wei Feng (MAS) bt Rajiv Ouseph (ENG) 21-11, 21-15
    Takuma Ueda (JAP) bt Ashton Chen Yong Zhao (SIN) 16-21, 21-11, 21-13
    Kenichi Tago (JAP) withdrew without playing, conceding a walkover to Eric Pang (NED)


    -TODAY/AFP
    Last edited by Loh; 08-05-2013 at 10:42 PM.

  7. #58
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    4,969
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Great work by Derek Wong.

  8. #59
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1 View Post
    Great work by Derek Wong.
    Yes he needs the confidence to face Daren Liew today.

    Your Ajay also did well to beat seeded WKW.

  9. #60
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Citizen of The World
    Posts
    14,345
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Well done, Derek Wong, scalping another famous Indonesian player in Sony Dwi Kuncoro, having a few years back, in the WC 2011 I think, beaten Taufik Hidayat. Hope to see you get the better of Darren Liew tomorrow. All the best!

  10. #61
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Badminton: Easy win for Gu Juan at World C'ships, but mixed doubles pair out

    Published on Aug 06, 2013
    5:07 PM




    Singapore shuttlers Vanessa Neo (right) and Danny Bawa Chrisnanta's campaign at the badminton world championships have come to an end, after the mixed doubles pair lost in their opening match to South Korea's Shin Baek Choel and Eom Hye Won on Tuesday, Aug 6, 2013. -- ST FILE PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG



    By May Chen

    Singapore women's singles shuttler Gu Juan made light work of her opponents in her opening match at the badminton World Championships, beating Lithuania's Akvile Stapusaityte 21-4, 21-12 on Tuesday evening.

    The world No. 20 will meet Thailand's world No. 5 Ratchanok Intanon next in the third round.

    Mixed doubles pair Vanessa Neo and Danny Bawa Chrisnanta, however, ended their campaign after going down in their opening match to South Korea's Shin Baek Choel and Eom Hye Won. The Singaporeans, ranked 16th in the world, lost 19-21, 13-21 to their world No. 22 opponents.

    Despite narrowly losing the opening game, Neo and Chrisnanta had started off the second game brightly, racing to a 4-0 lead. But the duo allowed the South Koreans to claw back, at one point allowing them a eight-point streak.

    (Let's see whether GJ can upset RI, who must be well-prepared for this WC. It will be difficult but we give her our full support. )

  11. #62
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    4,969
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Singapore badminton association have all the facilities and money to improve badminton scene in singapore. But still they are lagging in doing so. Atleast, they should come up with some new ideas and themes so that we can get good results . Let us see what steps will they take to promote badminton.

    When i went to singapore, i found many condos having badminton court for the benefit of people living there. Still it seems lagging in that sport. I don't know why?? Any reason..??

  12. #63
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1 View Post
    Singapore badminton association have all the facilities and money to improve badminton scene in singapore. But still they are lagging in doing so. Atleast, they should come up with some new ideas and themes so that we can get good results . Let us see what steps will they take to promote badminton.

    When i went to singapore, i found many condos having badminton court for the benefit of people living there. Still it seems lagging in that sport. I don't know why?? Any reason..??
    Please don't attempt to brag and be too clever here.

    This shows how childish and revengeful you can be just because of my comments on your "Sindhu thread" which you dislike.

    Just as you have said about my country, there must also be many areas that your own country can improve on its badminton prowess. What, with such a huge population second only to China now and expected to surpass it in about 20 years. But what is your country's standing right now relative to China's? Singapore is just a tiny country without superpower ambitions!

    Our own SBA is quite capable of doing a creditable job without your messing around.

    Good that you noticed we have many places for badminton enthusiasts. Indeed they are very lucky to be able to continue with their social game with better facilities.

    As I have said, taking up badminton as a profession is not quite the cup of tea for most of our talented badminton young as they and their parents feel they are able to earn a better living doing other things with a high academic or technical qualification. That's one reason why we are forced to import players, although they are not always the most talented in their own countries, so that Singapore can remain in the badminton circuit.

  13. #64
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    India
    Posts
    4,969
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh View Post
    Please don't attempt to brag and be too clever here.

    This shows how childish and revengeful you can be just because of my comments on your "Sindhu thread" which you dislike.

    Just as you have said about my country, there must also be many areas that your own country can improve on its badminton prowess. What, with such a huge population second only to China now and expected to surpass it in about 20 years. But what is your country's standing right now relative to China's? Singapore is just a tiny country without superpower ambitions!

    Our own SBA is quite capable of doing a creditable job without your messing around.

    Good that you noticed we have many places for badminton enthusiasts. Indeed they are very lucky to be able to continue with their social game with better facilities.

    As I have said, taking up badminton as a profession is not quite the cup of tea for most of our talented badminton young as they and their parents feel they are able to earn a better living doing other things with a high academic or technical qualification. That's one reason whey we are forced to import players, although they are not always the most talented in their own cou.ntries, so that Singapore can remain in the badminton circuit.
    Even i am saying the same to you.

    Did anybody asked anything and anybody dragged singapore unless or othewise some of your unneccesary statements against indian players which made me to reply you. Nothing wrong in saying that Singapore should take steps in improving badminton as if you always saying like "with such a huge population second only to China now and expected to surpass it in about 20 years. But what is your country's standing right now relative to China's?"

    BAI is also doing wonderful job in improving badminton in our country in all ways they can without your messing around.

    I have many classmates living in Singapore who are well settled in their young age. But nobody ever tried to participate in any sports. They feel like that is not their duty. Similar condition prevails in India as well. Children are not allowed to take sports as career as it won't pay them much. That trend is really changing nowadays (thanks to Leagues which give them hope for their livelihood). But here every parent is willing to make their sons/daughter as professionals.

    Unless their parents are sportspersons, they won't understand their siblings. This is the mentality in these countries. This should change. India is taking some of the initiatives to divert people' attention to sports as well.

    One thing for sure.. Whenever i go out, in India, i can find children playing cricket in any of the empty ground. Similarly, i found singapore children playing basketball in all and every building which had basket ball court. Direct from school, they ll start to play basket ball.
    Last edited by scorpion1; 08-16-2013 at 04:44 AM.

  14. #65
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1 View Post
    Even i am saying the same to you.

    Did anybody asked anything and anybody dragged singapore unless or othewise your some the unneccesary statements against indian players which made me to reply you. Nothing wrong in saying that Singapore should take steps in improving badminton as if you always saying like "with such a huge population second only to China now and expected to surpass it in about 20 years. But what is your country's standing right now relative to China's?"

    BAI is also doing wonderful job in improving badminton in our country in all ways they can without your messing around.

    I have many classmates living in Singapore who are well settled in their young age. But nobody ever try
    to participate or try to participate in any sports. They feel like that is not their duty. Similar condition prevails in India as well. Children are not allowed to take sports as career as it won't pay them much. That trend is really changing nowadays (thanks to Leagues which give them hope for their livelihood). But here every parent is willing to make their sons/daughter as professionals.

    Unless their parents are sportspersons, they won't understand their siblings. This is the mentality in these countries. This should change. India is taking some of the initiatives to divert people' attention to sports as well.

    One thing for sure.. Whenever i go out, in India, i can find children playing cricket in any of the empty ground. Similarly, i found singapore children playing basketball in all and every building which had basket ball court. Directly from school, they start to play basket ball.
    We have lots of school children playing badminton and other games. We even have a Sports School for those who are really talented but not the majority who will eventually become professional athletes. Our education system now encourages an all-round development to help children grow into better people who can enjoy a more healthy life-style when they become adults. Whether this will finally come true is left to be seen.

    You need to look back to your posts to analyse whether you should be saying some of them. Remember you should expect a response from what you said of others too. The right of reply must be expected and indeed be given.

  15. #66
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    malaysia
    Posts
    3,892
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1 View Post
    Singapore badminton association have all the facilities and money to improve badminton scene in singapore. But still they are lagging in doing so. Atleast, they should come up with some new ideas and themes so that we can get good results . Let us see what steps will they take to promote badminton.

    When i went to singapore, i found many condos having badminton court for the benefit of people living there. Still it seems lagging in that sport. I don't know why?? Any reason..??
    Singapore do not need social court actually, they are importing players from china, Indonesia and Thailand... Amazing things their scouts are doing, some are very good players.

  16. #67
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Blue planet
    Posts
    1,392
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scorpion1 View Post
    Singapore badminton association have all the facilities and money to improve badminton scene in singapore. But still they are lagging in doing so. Atleast, they should come up with some new ideas and themes so that we can get good results . Let us see what steps will they take to promote badminton.

    When i went to singapore, i found many condos having badminton court for the benefit of people living there. Still it seems lagging in that sport. I don't know why?? Any reason..??
    Many wrongs there.

    First, SBA does not have ALL money, I believe the amount that SBA can get from sponsor and the Singapore government is not as much as what CBA can. Given the size of the country. You can't compare. Even in Indonesia, the total private sponsor can far exceed that and you might be surprise that the amount of sponsor money for soccer in Indonesia can be far greater than badminton even though the result is totally opposite.

    Many condos having badminton court? I believe almost all condos have tennis court but less than 1 quarter of them have badminton court. There are probably more squash court in Singapore condo than badminton courts.

    And majority of Singapore don't live in condos.

    Anyway, I think many Singaporean children have interest in playing badminton but so rare of them going into full time badminton career and it is understandable.
    Last edited by sen; 08-16-2013 at 02:10 PM.

  17. #68
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    11,664
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Do remember that SBA is not Singapore.

    SBA is but one of the many sports associations in Singapore and the Singapore Sports Council (SSC), which represents the government, is responsible for the proper running of the national sports associations (NSA).

    NSAs which are doing well in terms of how they organize their sports and how well they, or their athletes, perform locally and internationally will get more funding from SSC. It is largely based on merit.

    In fact the SBA gets less funding from SSC than in the past because the performance of its players are less impressive. It now has to rely more on commercial sponsorships.

    Regarding badminton courts, indeed very, very few private condos have badminton courts. Only a handful of the private social clubs like the two swimming clubs (Chinese SC and Singapore SC), a graduate club (National University of Singapore Society, NUSS) and one golf club (Warren) have badminton courts, I believe. We also do not have halls that are large enough for anything more than 20 courts. That gives an idea of how physically small Singapore is.

    Many badminton courts are provided by the government like the community clubs in various constituencies all over the island and the school halls (hitherto unavailable for security reasons) that are now open to the public for recreation.

    So the game of badminton is encouraged for health and social bonding reasons among the working adults in particular.

    Although we are considered weak in badminton in the region, there are some sports which Singapore has shone in, even internationally, like sailing and bowling. We are the kingpins in ASEAN waterpolo and relatively strong in swimming! Surprisingly, in these sports, we do not have to import foreign talents to help us develop them to a higher standard. But that is another story apart from badminton.
    Last edited by Loh; 08-20-2013 at 02:53 AM.

Page 4 of 13 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Blog on the Singapore sports scene
    By Sealman in forum Singapore
    Replies: 0
    : 06-26-2007, 03:56 AM
  2. badminton scene in singapore
    By cooler in forum General Forum
    Replies: 2
    : 03-05-2006, 11:22 PM
  3. New to the BF scene (old to badminton scene)
    By BTC2004 in forum Introduction
    Replies: 15
    : 05-20-2004, 06:02 AM
  4. Badminton Scene in London?
    By Pebulutangkis in forum UK
    Replies: 2
    : 02-15-2004, 06:08 PM
  5. Declining S'pore badminton scene
    By Jo in forum General Forum
    Replies: 5
    : 04-03-2001, 07:05 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •