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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    Default Strategy and tactics help

    Hi BC,

    Can anyone recommend a good coaching site that can help with strategy and tactics? I have reached the point where I can play most shots but get caught out on tactics and shot selection. If I knew what shot/s I could play in a certain position then my game would improve greatly. I already know about LJB and BWF but they are shot specific.

    I play mixed and mens at a reasonable level and want to stop making those silly, repeated mistakes which lead to pressure and losing the point.

    Thank you.

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    I don't know any other sites that talks a lot about strategy and tactics, but shot selection in doubles is pretty simple really. If the shuttle is above the net, hit it down, either straight or in the middle. If the shuttle is below the net, lift it to the backcourt. If it's around net height, drive/push it if you feel confident in your and your partner's positioning. Otherwise, lift it to the backcourt. You can break these rules if your opponent has some sort of major weakness, you spot a large opening due to your opponents being out of position, or you are taking the shuttle in an extremely advantageous position where putting the shuttle with pace anywhere on the court will apply a lot of pressure to your opponents (e.g. if your opponents hit a weak midcourt lift, then you can smash pretty much anywhere as long as it's fast and steep).

    However, every time you hit a shot that breaks these rules, you are taking some amount of risk. For instance, if you smash and your opponents manage to drive it past your partner at the net, the shuttle will most likely get to you below net height. The safest option in that situation is to lift to the backcourt. Many people will instead attempt to block the shuttle to the net. This is taking a risk because your shot will have to travel upwards which gives your opponents more time. If your opponents recognize that you have to address the shuttle below net height, then one of them should move forwards, anticipating that you have to hit the shuttle upwards, making your shot very difficult.

    Mixed is a bit more complicated and depends heavily on whether you are playing mixed with a level defense or with a front-back attacking position 100% of the time.

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    This makes a lot of sense and what I try to do. However you have forgotten to mention using tight net shots to force a lift or a mistake. With mixed we rotate if needed and to gain the initiative.

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    tactics and strategy are moving targets from one opponent to the next, even within the same game. u r right that when one is under pressure, one tends to do the same thing.
    improve yr footwork, u will find yourself having more variety of shots (because u have more time).

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    Quote Originally Posted by diverdan View Post
    Hi BC,

    Can anyone recommend a good coaching site that can help with strategy and tactics? I have reached the point where I can play most shots but get caught out on tactics and shot selection. If I knew what shot/s I could play in a certain position then my game would improve greatly. I already know about LJB and BWF but they are shot specific.

    I play mixed and mens at a reasonable level and want to stop making those silly, repeated mistakes which lead to pressure and losing the point.

    Thank you.
    Hi diverdan,

    Please stay tune for I am working with DNA, Derrick Ng Athletics, to build a site to explain, teach and answer a lot of questions people are having.

    In regards to men's doubles, let me try and give you a small insight to strategy and tactics. There is so much strategy and tactics that can be involved that one post will not just be able to cover.

    There are 4 types of games you must have to play good men's doubles.
    1) Attacking game - creating chances by taking the net forcing the opponent to hit the high lift so you can or your partner can smash, drive, and end up winning the rally while attacking.
    2) Defensive game - being able to heavy a steady defense wearing out the opponent and then creating opportunities by quickly converting and moving in to attack.
    3) Quick drive/flat game - This is where you are playing really flat most of the time. Pushing off serve, lifting flat and quick, driving the opponent's smash, hitting flat and coming in with your racquet up, etc.
    4) Moving game - This game is where you can control the shuttle enough to move your opponents around. Example, opponent is smashing at you straight, you quickly cross lift over the front player so the back player has to run across the back. Then the opponents try and rotate and you place the bird in the hole of their rotation, making them scramble a bit to recover. This game will also consist of changing the speed and location of your smash, and doing some good fake/hold drop shots.

    Why you need these 4 games is simple. Even though you could have a really good quick flat game, you may end up playing somebody who is even better at that style or they're able to play the good moving game. When that happens, you must be able to acknowledge that and change your style to prey on their weakness and to take advantage of your own skills.

    Last word of general advice.. remember this, in men's doubles, the front person is to set up the back person who then sets up the front person. So in example, the front person is to create the lift opportunity so the back person can smash with the appropriate speed, angle and location according to the position of the front person, so the front person can win the point and finish the rally.

    I hope this make sense. Please feel free to ask me questions for I will be demonstrating and explaining a lot in HD Video for free in the near future with DNA.

    Derrick

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    Regular Member betazone's Avatar
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    Try this http://www.badmintonbible.com/

    One of the most underrated and seldom mention areas is trickery and deception. double stroke or hold and hit are some of the common ones. I don't think it's possible to subconsciouly tell yourself to be a tricky plyr on cour or overnite, you need training to be built into your muscle memory.

    just my 2 cents n good luck

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    Look for Jake Downey's "Winning Badminton Doubles". It contains a very detailed disection of the game, including Mixed Doubles (I believe). I read this quite extensively many years ago, and found it to be very useful.

    You maybe able to find it in your local library, inter-library loan, eBay, or online. Here's the Table of Content that I can find online:

    http://www.batsbadminton.co.uk/image...s-Contents.pdf

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^^ Jake Downey's book for your reading pleasure...

    http://www.badminton-information.com...n-doubles.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by diverdan View Post
    Hi BC,

    Can anyone recommend a good coaching site that can help with strategy and tactics? I have reached the point where I can play most shots but get caught out on tactics and shot selection. If I knew what shot/s I could play in a certain position then my game would improve greatly. I already know about LJB and BWF but they are shot specific.

    I play mixed and mens at a reasonable level and want to stop making those silly, repeated mistakes which lead to pressure and losing the point.

    Thank you.
    Hi there,

    Discussing and appreciating the significant practical value of tactics in badminton regardless if it's in single or double will not be sufficient enough through words mentioning here. Since tactics in badminton is an on going thought process that a player needs to carefully plan so that his action while playing can correctly align to achieve that winning point at the end of his match, a player needs to quickly analyze certain critical parameters and then quickly adapt those findings to his style of play by means of hard practice in order to achieve that winning results. The role of strong mental character is vital to achieve this and if you're confident in the way you think, then you will have the constant energy to perform the relevant action in how you play to achieve the goal from your tactics. Generally, perform a SWOT analysis:

    S : Strength

    What are the strength that you possess in your style of game play?. Fully understand it and do a lot of drills and practice to strengthen this and adapt it in how you play so that you can harness this strength constantly towards you while playing. For an example, if most of your winning points comes from how you can keep a constant offensive style of play towards your opponent then, you tactics of play should be in such a way that your opponent/s are force to send the birdie to you so that your action of play can achieve this goal.

    W : Weakness

    Identify what are your significant weaknesses. Train hard to correct this so that it can't be an opportunity to your opponent and while playing, your tactics of play preferably should avoid you to confront such scenario. If unforced errors is the area of your concern for an example, mistakes regularly happens from a weak net play, train hard to rectify this and while playing, preferably avoid from confronting a head to head net play battle if your not confident.

    O : Opportunity

    Quickly identify what are the visible opportunities that may arise and your tactics of play should adapt in order to strike the winning points be it through the use of your own strength or through means of your opponent weaknesses. Since badminton is a fast moving games, the window for such opportunities will be very short and therefore you should use it wisely when the opportunities arise.

    T : Threat

    Identify what are your opponent threats and your tactic of play should be in such a way that you should avoid from giving all the possible opportunities to him so that your opponent can harness his threat as his strength.

    Seems easy to write such lengthy guide but the only way for you to stream line naturally and correctly all the above approach to achieve that winning ends in your tactics of play is only through constant practice and playing regularly with an equivalent or better player than you.

    SS

  10. #10
    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derrickn View Post
    There are 4 types of games you must have to play good men's doubles.
    1) Attacking game - creating chances by taking the net forcing the opponent to hit the high lift so you can or your partner can smash, drive, and end up winning the rally while attacking.
    2) Defensive game - being able to heavy a steady defense wearing out the opponent and then creating opportunities by quickly converting and moving in to attack.
    3) Quick drive/flat game - This is where you are playing really flat most of the time. Pushing off serve, lifting flat and quick, driving the opponent's smash, hitting flat and coming in with your racquet up, etc.
    4) Moving game - This game is where you can control the shuttle enough to move your opponents around. Example, opponent is smashing at you straight, you quickly cross lift over the front player so the back player has to run across the back. Then the opponents try and rotate and you place the bird in the hole of their rotation, making them scramble a bit to recover. This game will also consist of changing the speed and location of your smash, and doing some good fake/hold drop shots.
    Yes I agree. A point may contain all these elements. Being able to change the pattern of a rally or adapting to and overcoming your opponents strategy within each point is a good aim to have.

    I also think having a consistent tight low serve is crucial at a higher level. I have played people before who weren't exceptionally good but their service gave them some bonus points.
    Last edited by diverdan; 09-14-2012 at 12:30 PM.

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    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    maybe we can discuss here if you having a problem with your partner http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...Double-Tactics

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M3Series View Post
    maybe we can discuss here if you having a problem with your partner http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...Double-Tactics
    Thanks. If my partner isn't performing then I generally say something positive. However if you both are aware of the tactics and strategy and have assessed your opponents then a short chat before the game starts normally avoids on court misunderstandings. Ongoing reassessments during the game are important too. Any coaching is better left for practice nights.

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    make sure you check out the link in my post earlier to jake downey's book that is available online

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    make sure you check out the link in my post earlier to jake downey's book that is available online
    Im reading it and making notes. Thanks Visor there are a lot of gems to be found.

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    I also think your own mental concentration and physical condition has a large part to play in how you perform. If you lose concentration and the mind starts to wander then your game gets worse or if you haven't eaten properly before playing a match this can effect stamina levels, etc.

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    I found something by LJB about basic positioning at the net which may be interesting to some BC'ers. Not much strategy but useful in terms of where to be on the court so you can be in position to attack. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPio...e_gdata_player

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    very good book (Jake Downey's). Since this book was written 30 years wondering any strategy/ tactics have changed since then.

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