User Tag List

Page 15 of 23 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 LastLast
Results 239 to 255 of 385
  1. #239
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    36,130
    Mentioned
    55 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    can you guys see this video?

    http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/badminton/badminton-highlights-kor-vs-ind-controversy.html

    s
    hould have INA vs. KOR highlights.

  2. #240
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,185
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    can you guys see this video?

    http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/badminton/badminton-highlights-kor-vs-ind-controversy.html

    s
    hould have INA vs. KOR highlights.
    NBC is only allowed to show Olympic competition video on the internet to users in the United States and U.S. Territories.

    Users outside of those locations will still have access to an extensive set of non-event video on NBCOlympics.com.


  3. #241
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Indonesia
    Posts
    5,893
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jjashik View Post
    I am a proponent for badminton (as well as indoor volleyball, among other sports) to be played during the winter olympics rather than summer. It seems to me that it would better match the seasonal peaking of the players' schedules, and it is a sport that can only be played indoors anyway (unless they want to introduce "beach badminton").

    In addition, it would add interest in the winter games among the countries who currently have little to no interest.
    The Southeast Asians will think it is insane to consider badminton a 'Winter' sport... We play badminton all throughout the year without ever seeing 'Winter'... Actually, badminton lovers [ALL OVER THE WORLD] play badminton all year long. Basketball and volleyball lovers play their respective sport all year long toooo... Hahaha...

    And the Winter games generate almost ZERO interest for the people who live in the tropical areas... Ahem, and there are 2 billion of us who are like that. Keep badminton in the Summer games, where all 7 billion people on this planet are interested.

  4. #242
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,462
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default China's Yu quits badminton

    China's Yu quits badminton after Olympic match-fixing disqualification

    Yu Yang, one of eight competitors who deliberately played to lose, makes announcement as Beijing orders public apology
    Olympic badminton doubles champion Yu Yang, second from right, has quit the sport after being disqualified from London 2012 for throwing a match. Photograph: Bazuki Muhammad/Reuters

    The Chinese Olympic badminton doubles champion Yu Yang has announced she is quitting the sport, hours after being disqualified from the Olympics for deliberately throwing a match. Beijing, meanwhile, has ordered its badminton team to apologise for the fiasco.

    "This is my last competition. Goodbye Badminton World Federation, goodbye my beloved badminton," the 26-year-old wrote on the country's Weibo microblogging service.

    Her message came shortly after state news agency Xinhua announced that Chinese officials had ordered Yu, her partner Wang Xiaoli and the head of their Olympic badminton team to publicly apologise.

    Yu and her teammate Wang Xiaoli were disqualified by badminton's governing body on Wednesday along with two South Korean pairs and an Indonesian duo for "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport".

    The round-robin arrangements gave players an interest in losing so that they could face easier contests at the elimination stage. But spectators booed them off the court, enraged by the farcical matches in which players deliberately served into the net, hit shots wide or missed easy returns.

    Xinhua quoted an unnamed spokesman as saying: "The [Chinese] delegation has already severely criticised and educated the responsible badminton leaders, team and relevant players and demanded they profoundly recognise the seriousness and the harmfulness of this matter, reflect deeply on it, publicly apologise and resolutely prevent such incidents from happening again."

    Li Yongbo, chief coach of the Chinese badminton team, said his players' behaviour reflected the shortcomings of the new rules but said that was no excuse. "The key point is we did not behave professionally as athletes and did not treat each match seriously," he told Xinhua.

    "We didn't strive with all our might in the Olympic way ... As chief coach I really feel I must say sorry to fans and viewers nationwide."

    The international governing body for the sport has already apologised. "We are very, very sorry that this has happened, both for the players and for the sport," said Thomas Lund, chief executive of the Badminton World Federation (BWF).

    Lund said it took the problem very seriously but claimed that overall the group stages had been "a tremendous success". He dismissed as "hindsight" the widespread criticism that officials should have predicted the fiasco when they adopted the new format.

    Several people, including employees of the federation, have said concerns about the format had been raised long before the Games. The British badminton player Gail Emms, who won silver in the mixed doubles at the 2004 Games, said: "As soon as I heard about the group stage six or seven months ago, I went: 'That's going to see people trying to fix the draw.' I knew it could happen.

    "It's unfair to all the players. They just wanted to be medallists for their country. It's a tactic. This is why you need straight knockouts."

    The chaos began when a Danish duo unexpectedly beat the second-seeded Chinese pair, meaning that China's top seeds would have faced their compatriots in a match if they won at the group stage. The second seeds remain in the contest.

    Before Yu's resignation the Chinese Olympic delegation said its athletes had "violated the Olympics ideal and the spirit of fair play". It did not appeal against the disqualification of the players. South Korea unsuccessfully appealed for the reinstatement of Jung Kyun-eun and Kim Ha-na, who were Yu and Wang's opponents, and two more players, Ha Jung-eun and Kim Min-jung. Indonesia challenged the disqualification of Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii but later withdrew the appeal.

    An Indian complaint that a Japanese duo attempted to throw another match was rejected.

    In China reaction to the disqualification of its champions has been mixed, with widespread sympathy for the athletes, even from those who believed the BWF had acted correctly. Some web users said they had not fully understood the criticism until they saw the match. "Having seen the highlights video I became quite angry," wrote a journalist, Cez Lin.

    "Although the match means paying attention to the strategies and tactics, to do it like this was unworthy of those who bought tickets and sat in front of the TV waiting to watch. Too irresponsible! The disqualification is as it should be."

    But others voiced anger with the organisers, with one microblogger writing: "This is a mistake with the arrangements and you cannot allow the athletes to shoulder the blame." Another pointed out: "Although it goes against the spirit of sports, the Olympic committee did not clearly rule this out in the regulations."

    Fans reacted with dismay to Yu's announcement, with several seeing the athletes as the victims. "I would support them if they were brave enough to say their coach put them up to it," wrote one microblog user.

    Another said: "It is not fair to criticise Yu Yang. She is a victim of the badminton match system. We should encourage her to stand up again, not attack her. She did it for the team and she sacrificed her interest. Chinese people should support her, understand her and be proud of her."

  5. #243
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    MIA
    Posts
    29,966
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    can you guys see this video?

    http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/badminton/badminton-highlights-kor-vs-ind-controversy.html

    s
    hould have INA vs. KOR highlights.
    Pls upload to youtube or file sharing website... thanks

  6. #244
    Regular Member arfandy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    China, Thailand, & Indonesia
    Posts
    675
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    does anyone have any link to the complete footage as how they got disqualified? somehow youtube has no videos regarding these matches. pls...

  7. #245
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    907
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xXazn_romeoXx View Post
    I agree that this is too far. First off, you're technically doing the ethical thing, and DQing the pairs are justified for the lack of show for the fans. However, what you also are doing, is taking the show away from those same fans that paid to watch the "more exciting" and "more meaningful" quarterfinals-semifinals and finals. Now, instead of superstars, they can watch Tier 2 countries go at it. How is that for ironic?

    I'm not defending their actions, but objectively, the way I see it, they did nothing wrong. It was well within their rights to play however they want. And please don't confuse this with match-fixing. There was no "fix". No one was predestined to win, and the other to lose. They BOTH wanted to lose. Besides, neither of the matches were between the same country's players, so why even bring up CHN vs CHN? It has nothing to do with this. They are both related in terms of sullying the good name of sportsmanship and competition. So yes, they are wrong in that sense. But you've never said no one could "not play hard" before. So why do it now? Why not charge Lin Dan, Taufik, Lee Choong Wei and other top players for their "first round farces" when they deliberately not try hard in a game? You know as well as I do that it won't happen. They won like they should have. So why take action now? Maybe YY/WXL etc would prevail and keep the seedings correct. You just don't have the right placing in your draw. I just think these 4 are scapegoats from BWF (big brother)'s blunder. BWF picked group play from nowhere, so BWF is to blame.
    If they want straight play, they should restrict each country to just 1 team.

  8. #246
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    907
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JLIU92 View Post
    seriously disqualification is too severe. The countries may be at fault, but none the less, so is the federation. The countries would not be in such a controversial situation, but for the federation's ignorant decision of changing the draw from knockout to round robin. If the federation had thought through it clearly, then they would have identified this issue of match fixing. With a dead rubber, players are more likely to fix their matches, and have it advantage their country's chances of winning a medal. If it were knockout, then every player would have only once chance to make it to the round of 16, quarters etc etc.

    The federation may say that this change would expand Badminton's awareness throughout the world, however it makes no difference. If people like badminton; even without commercialising it, the world would be aware of this sport. Right now, the Federation really have made an impact on the sport's awareness; a negative view.

    in regards to Korea blaming China, that's just absolutely ridiculous. How can Korea blame China for their voluntary misconduct? No one forced Korea or Indonesia to lose their games. It was all done tactically, and by their own choice. Because the federation decided to change the draw, they should then be aware of the tactics that countries will adapt, in order to win. They can't expect to rely on the Olympic Spirit, and rules they have set. The rules in this situation are clearly not applicable. Because round robin can cause so much controversy, as it had this time, a different set of rules should have been created. The rule "best effort in winning a match" is clearly unacceptable. What is best effort? To the chinese, they stated they wanted to preserve energy. In preserving energy, they used only what was necessary, which can ideally be argued as best effort. The terms are way too broad to be construed in a narrow interpretation.

    Furthermore, "cause detriment to the sport". The federation knew of such rule, and by changing the format to round robin, they should have been aware of the possible controversies that would come about from the tournament. Because the federation should have been aware; yet they clearly disregarded such consideration, the sportsmen whom fixed their matches cannot be considered as causing a detriment to the sport.
    The new RR format is like the speed traps that some of us are aware of. By changing the speed limit, many drivers could become "criminals". I still maintain, if absolute individual effort is to be encouraged, restricts each country to just 1 entry (maybe 2, and put them on separate halves).

  9. #247
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    malaysia
    Posts
    354
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Heard from news that Yu Yang has decided to retire

  10. #248
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    26 yrs old is still pretty young for Yu Yang to retire, imo...but with the boat load of younger CHN WD players still waiting to get a chance to play, i'd be surprised if she's to play again for CHN..thus this is most likely her final international tourney..

  11. #249
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    World Wide Web
    Posts
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HappySachs View Post
    Right choice. However if the officials had done their job properly and DQ'd the first two pairs like they threatened then it would have saved the second two pairs.
    Why would the other two pair need saving it's the Olympics play competitively or go home.

  12. #250
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    World Wide Web
    Posts
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HappySachs View Post
    Right choice. However if the officials had done their job properly and DQ'd the first two pairs like they threatened then it would have saved the second two pairs.
    Why would the other two pairs need saving? Played competitively or go home.

  13. #251
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    u.s.a.
    Posts
    19,157
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dthser View Post
    omg Korean Pairs are soo stupid HAHAHAHHHAHAHAHAHHA
    ...
    Koreans DESERVE TO BE DISQUALIFIED DUE TO STUPDITY
    their tactic, not them, may be stupid but they took a gamble (with the knowledge they'll be canned/DQed if worse comes to worst; i guess they're prepared for it)...it's a wasted effort in trying to qualify for this yr's OG, but can always look at it another way in that in 4 more yrs, they probably could still try in 2016 OG..

  14. #252
    Regular Member etudiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Christian Grey's playroom
    Posts
    12,214
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yu Yang will be retired due to dissapointment over this fiasco ???

    That's real shame...at least she can do more in Rio.....

  15. #253
    Regular Member etudiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Christian Grey's playroom
    Posts
    12,214
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hopefully this is never happened again in future

  16. #254
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    US
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You might as well take basketball, gym, diving, fencing, weightlifting....leave summer olympics with only outdoor sports.

    Quote Originally Posted by jjashik View Post
    I am a proponent for badminton (as well as indoor volleyball, among other sports) to be played during the winter olympics rather than summer. It seems to me that it would better match the seasonal peaking of the players' schedules, and it is a sport that can only be played indoors anyway (unless they want to introduce "beach badminton").

    In addition, it would add interest in the winter games among the countries who currently have little to no interest.

  17. #255
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    wales
    Posts
    128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Poor players... it's not their fault entirely. They are just products of a system. I think the coaches and other advisors should take the blame because they are the people who introduce the players into the system. The coach should resign, not the player.

Page 15 of 23 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •