User Tag List

View Poll Results: Are you flat-footed?

Voters
1178. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes.

    534 45.33%
  • No.

    644 54.67%
Page 10 of 19 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 LastLast
Results 154 to 170 of 313
  1. #154
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamie.zx
    So do you think having flat feet is a disadvantage then, - in temrs of performance - I think we all accept it does not look too great and I say that as a someone with severe flat feet...JAmie
    In my view, true flat feet are a disadvantage in badminton, because they:

    1. Reduce the shock absorption that arches provide;
    2. Reduce the ability of the feet to push off from the ground, and therefore reduce the speed of movement.
    I believe that persons with flat feet are at greater risk of developing joint problems, because of the lack of normal shock absorbing actions of the feet. I think these persons should be especially careful to choose low-impact exercise in preference to high-impact exercise wherever possible.

    I am not an expert on this subject, however, so you may take my opinion lightly

  2. #155
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    From experience, I know that it is possible to increase force absorbtion abilities in your lower legs, as well as using that force to push off powerfully. These things are trained while doing plantar flexor stiffness drills, which primarily work the calves, but develop the muscles in the feet as well.

    That leads me to this question - are most cases of flat feet really just cases of poor conditioning of the lower legs? I'm thinking that perhaps some people just haven't developed their force absorbtion ability, so whenever their feet land it slaps the ground instead of landing quietly.

    It just seems that a lot of people say they have flat feet as an excuse for why they move slowly or inefficiently on court.

  3. #156
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stumblingfeet
    That leads me to this question - are most cases of flat feet really just cases of poor conditioning of the lower legs? I'm thinking that perhaps some people just haven't developed their force absorbtion ability, so whenever their feet land it slaps the ground instead of landing quietly.

    It just seems that a lot of people say they have flat feet as an excuse for why they move slowly or inefficiently on court.
    I think your analysis/guess is spot on.

    Like I said, true flat feet are comparatively rare. Even doctors sometimes misdiagnose flat feet, or fail to explain that they only mean partial flat feet.

    My flat feet were due not to any fundamental problem; they were due to my under-developed muscles and poor neurological control of the feet. This goes way back to when I suffered severe ME and could not walk for some months. I believe that when I relearned how to walk, I did not learn very well.

    To a considerable extent, physiotherapy and orthotic insoles have resolved the problem; I no longer seem to have flat feet.

    I strongly advise anyone who thinks he has flat feet, to have a proper assessment with an orthotist/podiatrist. Consulting a physio can also be helpful.

    Do not assume that, because you have once been labelled as "flat footed", that you possess an incurable conditon. In most cases, so-called flat footedness responds well to simple treatment.
    Last edited by Gollum; 08-06-2006 at 11:01 AM.

  4. #157
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    so what kind of exercizes did you do - was it hard - I would really like to get a good arch in my feet aesthetically as well as for health reasons

  5. #158
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamie.zx
    so what kind of exercizes did you do - was it hard - I would really like to get a good arch in my feet aesthetically as well as for health reasons
    I didn't do many exercises; they were not difficult.

    For me, it was necessary to learn how to arch the foot correctly. Insoles helped a lot too.

    I think you are unlikely to change the visible shape of your feet much, however. Mine don't really look any different. It's more about learning to use the small muscles in your feet, and not about changing the shape of your feet.

  6. #159
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    1,110
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The exercises I was thinking of are force absorbtion drops - they are the most basic and fundamental of plyometric exercises.

    It begins with with a small hop into the air or stepping off of a low box and then landing on both feet. What you should aim to do is land softly and quietly. Think of how a good gymnast lands after performing some kind of move - they "stick" the landing and are able to stay balanced. This is a pass/fail type of thing, either you have a good landing or a bad one (e.g. your feet slap the floor, they make a thumping sound or you lose your balance). It's all about progression - once you get good at the landing, you can increase the difficulty.

    The first progression is to add some movement. Get your body moving forwards, backwards, sideways or spinning as you land. This way you'll be teaching your body to land and absorb forces coming in multiple directions.

    The second progression is to vary your landing positions. Initially, you can start with the squat position. Later, you can add such positions as the split squat (lunge), wider or closer stance squat, and eventually single leg landings.

    Finally, the third progression is to increase the loading by increasing the momentum that has to be stopped while you land. The first method would be to add some weight to your landing. The second would be to increase your speed at landing either by dropping from a greater height or using a heavy elastic band to "slingshot" you towards the ground. This stage is considered very advanced, and it would be best to have a decent level of strength (typically a mininum of 1.5x bodyweight squat) before trying these.

    What's interesting is that a lot of these skills are seen in young children playing at a park. They'll run, hop, jump off the play structure, etc. I guess the thing is that these days a lot of kids might choose playing video games over playing in the park, so these abilities may be less developed than when tv or computers weren't around.

  7. #160
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    5
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default flat feet

    Thank you for the advice - actually quite different to the apporach I was given to trying to develop my arches when I was a teenager. Hopefully it might help us out.

    Don't really agree that we use being flat-footed as an excuse for being slower though - when I was I was by our coach told I had the worst case of flat feet she had ever seen which has made me pretty self-conscious about it (although I do agree it looks terrible ). So - with this negative perception do not really agree with you saying flat feet are used as an excuse for being slow. Assume you do not have flat feet yourself - so from my experience of severe discomfort when playing it does slow you down when it the (often severe discomfort) starts. Obviously you think there are ways of improving it which is great...so as I said, that is great. Equally there are some people with flat feet who just have to get on with it as well as possible.

  8. #161
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am extremely flatfooted. But I find that the use of orthotics can help and most of the time it doesn't bother me when I play badminton, unless I forget to put them in. Then it hurts.

  9. #162
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London area, UK
    Posts
    3,977
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jamie.zx
    Thank you for the advice - actually quite different to the apporach I was given to trying to develop my arches when I was a teenager. Hopefully it might help us out.

    Don't really agree that we use being flat-footed as an excuse for being slower though
    You don't use it as an excuse, but some people -- who do not have true flat feet -- do.

  10. #163
    New Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Silentscorpion
    is there a way to cure Flat-foot without expensive orthodics
    I used to have flat feet and then I bought a pair of Birkenstock sandals. The first three days of wearing them were TORTURE -- the bottoms of my feet swelled so much that my "arches" were the only things hitting the ground -- but after that, I started to notice an arch developing. Many years later, my arches are quite pronounced and rather lovely. Your Mileage May Vary, but it worked for me. Good luck!

  11. #164
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    9,99$/day Location? Montréal
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I know flat footed people that doesn't make extra-efforts
    are way less performing than normal-footed people (no offence on the word "normal"
    I got the Normal-Type feet. A friend of mine (almost 6') cant
    touch the ring of a basketball basket,
    but I (5'9") can, thus due to his flat foot I guess,
    He is kinda in-shape, too. It's not like i took an
    example of a mega-obese guy

  12. #165
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Flat feet not as athletic?...

    I can compete and sprint faster than the people with archs. Also i have an exceptional ability to jump quite far

  13. #166
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    9,99$/day Location? Montréal
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by a_n_d_y
    Flat feet not as athletic?...

    I can compete and sprint faster than the people with archs. Also i have an exceptional ability to jump quite far
    thus due to your training, if you compete.
    For sure, there are exceptions.
    but the majority aren't as good

  14. #167
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Maple Ridge, BC
    Posts
    64
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RiceBaiiKhao
    thus due to your training, if you compete.
    For sure, there are exceptions.
    but the majority aren't as good
    Actually, i don't train at all. I just come out of nowwhere during school track and field or just gym exercises and beat everyone.

    But like you said, there are exceptions.

  15. #168
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    774
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kurodo
    my friend played badminton and is now running on x-country... hes flat footed...

    if flatfootedness is viewed as non-athletic.. shouldnt asthmatic people also be viewed as non-athletic? ive been hospitalized from asthma a few times wen i was younger, now i run a 4-5 miles at a quick pace without crapping out at all.. but i can still feel the asthma

    with enough training and determination... one can overcome these limitations, theres no doubt you have to work alot harder than those that dont have these obstacles.. so dont give up people!! theres is hope for everyone if youre willing to give it some WORK.. go people!! lolz
    great speech, nice

  16. #169
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    9,99$/day Location? Montréal
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You have to know that the person with an advantage and
    that trains also can overcome other people. It will start itching you
    to know you are flat-flooted, but blame your loses (if you lose a lot)
    on other things, and try to focus on the game.. i once blamed every
    thing on my wrist, then lol i knew it was wrong. Just some advice after
    reading this thread..

  17. #170
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    vancouver,canada
    Posts
    1,663
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    get orthodontics for your feet, i have them just that they cost around 200-300 dollars lol! but it's worth it because yeah..

Page 10 of 19 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Flat footed players
    By Emmanuel-Phua in forum Clothing & Footwear
    Replies: 6
    : 05-18-2009, 02:45 AM
  2. Calling Wide & Flat-footed players - please help
    By Squelchie in forum Clothing & Footwear
    Replies: 12
    : 10-02-2008, 11:43 PM
  3. Being Wrong Footed!!
    By Timbuctoo in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 3
    : 07-08-2008, 01:37 AM
  4. Flat Footed
    By t3tsubo in forum General Forum
    Replies: 7
    : 03-15-2007, 10:00 PM
  5. two footed movement?
    By Valentino in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 4
    : 01-09-2002, 07:46 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •