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View Poll Results: Are you flat-footed?

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  • Yes.

    538 45.36%
  • No.

    648 54.64%
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  1. #171
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    Default Flat Feet (Pes Planus)

    Interesting discussion and as a podiatrist and raqueteer, one close to my heart. You may be interested to know that those with pes planus have been shown to be high achievers.
    From The Age newspaper:

    Flat-footed 'are high achievers'
    By Harriet Alexander
    July 14, 2005

    Flat-Footed people suffer pain, cannot join the army and are perceived as physically inept. But research on flat-footed children shows they can jump 15 per cent higher than average children and have equally good balance and motor skills. The only area they performed worse in was "lateral hopping" - hopping sideways over a piece of string.

    Dara Twomey, a University of NSW biomechanics researcher, decided to study flat feet after working as a physical education teacher for 10 years and noticing that more children seemed to have them.

    She was startled by her results. "I was expecting to find that they would be worse (at jumping). I didn't think they would be able to take off the ground as easily."

    Flat feet can be rigid, where there is no discernible arch, or flexible, where the arch appears when the foot is lifted from the floor. They can be caused by such factors as obesity and genetics, and people who have them are more likely to get foot, knee and lower back pain.

    The study tested 54 children aged between nine and 12, half with flat feet and half with normal arches, with exercises such as balancing on one leg, hopping over a string and jumping. Each child was fitted with 17 retro-reflective devices between the knee and the foot, which monitored the interaction of their joints.
    and
    Flat-feet can jump higher

    July 14, 2005

    BEING flat-footed doesn't mean you are a nerd who shouldn't be allowed near a sporting field - in fact, it can be an advantage in some physical activities.

    Dara Twomey, a University of NSW biomechanics researcher, has discovered that children with flat feet can jump up to 15 per cent higher than average in a standard vertical jump test.

    The "highly detailed" comparison of 27 flat-footed children and 27 children with normally arched feet, all aged between 9 and 12, revealed that those with flat feet had stronger lower calf muscles.

    No difference was found between the groups' ability to balance in normal standing, with eyes closed, on one leg, or on a wobble board.

    However, the flat-footed children had difficulty with lateral hopping when asked to hop sideways over a low obstacle as many times as possible in 30 seconds.

    Those with normal arches averaged 52; those with low arches only reached 40 hops.

    "Further research is needed to determine why having low arches helps you to jump better, or why it hinders your lateral hopping ability," Ms Twomey said.

    "But we now know that in terms of performance outcomes, there's no major disadvantage in low-arched feet."

    The tests were performed in the UNSW Gait Analysis Laboratory to determine if flat feet affected children's performance of gross motor skills.

    Retro-reflective markers were put at key points on the children's bodies to present three-dimensional images on a computer screen.

    The children who took part in the research believed having flat feet was a physical disadvantage, and this might be affecting them psychologically, Ms Twomey said.

    "Their perception was that they weren't able to perform as well ... their perception is wrong," she said.

    "Children with flat feet may be disadvantaged by the stigma."

    Having flat feet certainly hasn't stopped the Natoli twins from excelling in sports.

    Daniella and Chiara, 13, participated in Ms Twomey's research.

    They have played waterpolo and netball since they were four and their team, the Opals, won the Randwick netball competition for first grade under-13s.

    "It's not a big issue for us," Daniella said. "After netball, my feet just get a bit sore."

    Imelda Natoli said her daughters' feet "haven't inhibited them at all".
    Of course flat feet can also be caused by ankle ligament damage - not unknown in badminton players and in these cases, the condition is considerably more disabling.

    Another thought on foot problems and badminton. Having recently changed my court shoes to Yonex from a substantially cheaper brand, I have sustained two lateral ankle sprains which have kept me out of action for several weeks. The Yonex shoes have substantially more lateral support and whilst this helps stability in most instances, when the ankle is inverted significantly, the lateral rigidity of the shoe actually increases the lateral ankle movement and produces a significantly worse ligament sprain/tear.

    Anyone else had similar experiences?

    MR

  2. #172
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    i have a problem, when i dont wear my customized orthos from my doctor i over pronate but when i do while playing badminton i under pronate... is this because the orthos werent made for sports?

  3. #173
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    What you must understand is pronation is a neccessary part of foot function. You say you over pronate normally when walking, yet under pronate when playing badminton. Your feet are doing different things! During a badminton game you will predominately be on the balls of your feet with your heels off the ground - in that position your subtalor joint will be supinated which effectively 'locks' the midtarsal joints and allows your foot to act as a rigid lever. The pronatory movement occurs when you need your foot as a shock abosrber - when you jump smash and land on your feet then fall back on your heels for instance. When walking your feet will be more relaxed and end range pronation is more likely to occur. What you describe is a perfectly normal function of the foot. Generally speaking, in most cases I would not advocate wearing your orthoses during play as this will possibly lead to ankle inversion sprains especially where the devices are high arched fully compensated orthoses.

  4. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurodo
    my friend played badminton and is now running on x-country... hes flat footed...

    if flatfootedness is viewed as non-athletic.. shouldnt asthmatic people also be viewed as non-athletic? ive been hospitalized from asthma a few times wen i was younger, now i run a 4-5 miles at a quick pace without crapping out at all.. but i can still feel the asthma

    with enough training and determination... one can overcome these limitations, theres no doubt you have to work alot harder than those that dont have these obstacles.. so dont give up people!! theres is hope for everyone if youre willing to give it some WORK.. go people!! lolz
    Haha, I have always been an asthmatic and I have flat foots. I have to train harder than everyone because of my asthma but I'm still able to play loooong games. The new point system is better for asthmatic imo. Makes the games shorter.

    Even if I'm gasping for air and my chest is burning(can't breathe), I never give up and it's giving results.

    NO PAIN NO GAIN.

  5. #175
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    i believe the army dont accept flat footed people too!

  6. #176
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    Default My experience with elite athletes

    I dont think flat-foot causes problems all the time. There are some of the best badminton and squash players who are flat footed. Some of my basketballers are too.

    It's just that if you are, you may want to consider careful selection of your insoles (preformed or custom-made) or shoes. Moreso if you have recurrent injuries in the hip, knees, legs, ankle and foot. Definitely, a visit to the physiotherapist, podiatrist, biomechanist or sports physician may help with your gait assessment (bring your shoes!). See the topic "Footwear and My Feet" at http://sportsnmedicine.blogspot.com.

    I still believe flat footed people like me can be very active in sports!

  7. #177
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    I am flat footed and I kinda move around the court like crazy when im on the offensive and the opponent hitting the shuttle deep into the corners. Im very active.... But does flat footedness have any relations to knee pain?? After a two hour session of badminton, I find that when I do a lot of lunges to hit the shuttle say from a steep drop at the net, the next day my knees especially my right knee (Im right footed/handed) has a little pain. But this pain goes away the next day. This happens every week but wasnt sure if only flat footed ppl have this pain. Just a thought.

  8. #178
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    Default Knee Problems

    Goku999,
    You need to have a physiotherapist or podiatrist look at your feet and your footwear. Bring your old shoes to them. Most of my athletes who had such problems solved them with proper insoles, addressing the muscle imbalance issues (hamstring & quadriceps), patella mobilisation, core stability (back / pelvis). You may also need to address your footwork and approach. Cut down on the lunges if you can. Dont work hard on it everyday. Ice after training regularly.

    I suspect that you would be having patellofemoral joint pain syndrome with possible patella tendinopathy. You can have a look at some of the articles in my blog at http://sportsnmedicine.blogspot.com on knee pain.

    Regards,

    sportsdoc

  9. #179
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    Quote Originally Posted by sportsdoc
    Goku999,
    You need to have a physiotherapist or podiatrist look at your feet and your footwear. Bring your old shoes to them. Most of my athletes who had such problems solved them with proper insoles, addressing the muscle imbalance issues (hamstring & quadriceps), patella mobilisation, core stability (back / pelvis). You may also need to address your footwork and approach. Cut down on the lunges if you can. Dont work hard on it everyday. Ice after training regularly.

    I suspect that you would be having patellofemoral joint pain syndrome with possible patella tendinopathy. You can have a look at some of the articles in my blog at http://sportsnmedicine.blogspot.com on knee pain.

    Regards,

    sportsdoc
    Thanks for the info doc .
    I have been wearing an insole (orthoheel) for flat feet in both shoes for bout a year know. As before I had foot pain near the arch whilst running or jumping etc. I wear it also whilst playing badminton. If the pain gets worse then I may consider a knee strap.

    Thanks

  10. #180
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    hello!
    Jagshemash?

    ok guys, i've found a book in my dad's cabinet called "Corrective gymnastics" (on my language though), my dad used to teach sports medicine for future coaches and therapists.

    It says that preventive action is very important when it comes to flat feet. Therefore, strengthening your feet musculature is important. These changes on feet are usually caught in their first phase which makes it possible to confront this deformation and in most cases people can stop any further development of flat feet. Of course, if it's some higher degree of deformation, it's best to go to your doctor and have a robotic splint made. Because people don't have exactly the same feet and deformation.
    Besides getting your splints made, it is recommended to walk bare feet on rough ground, such as gravel, especially when you go to the seaside on a vacation.

    I'll scan later today a few pages of the book for you to see the exercises mentioned.

    Later dudez and dudettes
    Last edited by lkomarci; 03-05-2007 at 06:46 AM.

  11. #181
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    here are only the first 4 pages. 10 more the go.
    Attached Images Attached Images        
    Last edited by lkomarci; 03-05-2007 at 07:59 AM.

  12. #182
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    yea on pg 1 those feet r gross LOL >.<

  13. #183
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    Default Insoles for flat feet

    Hi, I found this blog about these new insoles for flat feet (overpronation). You may want to check it out. Here is the link:
    http://myflatfeet.blogspot.com/
    The insoles are thin, don't have arch support but raised wedge under the big toe. That does the trick and builds up the muscles in your arc and also controls your posture. Neat.

  14. #184
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    Me not flat foot!

  15. #185
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    Ok I know this is an old thread but i just have to say this. I've played volleyball for seven years, starting in high school. I'm a guy and I jump pretty high so my legs take a pounding during games. Playing for my college club team, I began suffering from foot soreness and patella tendonitis (basically pain right below the kneecap). I thought it was Jumper's Knee, so I bought all kinds of fancy knee braces. The braces helped but didn't solve the knee pain.

    I always knew I had flat feet, but didn't think it was a serious problem. Two days ago I went to my doctor for a regular checkup and mentioned the knee pain. He asked me to stand barefoot, and was horrified at how flat my foot arches were. Basically the entire bottom of my foot was flush to the ground and my ankles were severely pronated. The good doc wrote me a referral to a podiatrist to get some custom arch support insoles.

    However, I had a v-ball tourney scheduled for today so I wanted to address the problem immediately. I stopped by a Walgreens and bought an arch support half-insole, it kinda looks like this... http://www.myfootshop.com/images/pro...3_orthotic.jpg
    They're light as a feather and only cost 9 dollars, put them in my volleyball shoes, played 4 matches in the day.

    WOW. I just finished the tourney (my team won), I'm relaxing expecting the usual foot soreness and knee tendon pain, and theres NONE!!! My legs feel tired but my feet and knee joints feel like I spent the day swimming, not jumping 2 feet into the air and crashing down hundreds of time in a few hours. THIS HAS BEEN A REVELATION. I will wear arch insoles for the rest of my life and I can't believe I didn't start wearing them years ago.

    My advice for every flat footed person on EARTH... it doesn't matter if you play volleyball, basketball, badminton or poker, GET ARCH INSOLES. Stop by any pharmacy like a Walgreens or Eckerd or Rite Aid. There will be different styles, gel insoles, foam or rubber. Try 'em on and get the one you like. It will only cost about ten dollars and it will CHANGE YOUR LIFE. Any flat footed person here have a job as a waiter or clerk where you have to stand all day? Get arch insoles and say goodbye to the pain forever. (Well you still have to work at the job but at least your feet won't hurt anymore. I work at a supermarket so I know the pain)

    Last point: Your podiatrist can make custom insoles for you, but they'll probably be hard plastic; fully rigid insoles aren't as comfy. Plus I don't think typical health insurance covers custom insoles. Instead of playing 100+ dollars for a custom rigid insole, grab the ten dollar foam ones that are nearly as good and can flex with the shoe.
    Last edited by greatwall18; 06-23-2007 at 09:42 PM.

  16. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwall18 View Post
    Ok I know this is an old thread but i just have to say this. I've played volleyball for seven years, starting in high school. I'm a guy and I jump pretty high so my legs take a pounding during games. Playing for my college club team, I began suffering from foot soreness and patella tendonitis (basically pain right below the kneecap). I thought it was Jumper's Knee, so I bought all kinds of fancy knee braces. The braces helped but didn't solve the knee pain.

    I always knew I had flat feet, but didn't think it was a serious problem. Two days ago I went to my doctor for a regular checkup and mentioned the knee pain. He asked me to stand barefoot, and was horrified at how flat my foot arches were. Basically the entire bottom of my foot was flush to the ground and my ankles were severely pronated. The good doc wrote me a referral to a podiatrist to get some custom arch support insoles.

    However, I had a v-ball tourney scheduled for today so I wanted to address the problem immediately. I stopped by a Walgreens and bought an arch support half-insole, it kinda looks like this... http://www.myfootshop.com/images/pro...3_orthotic.jpg
    They're light as a feather and only cost 9 dollars, put them in my volleyball shoes, played 4 matches in the day.

    WOW. I just finished the tourney (my team won), I'm relaxing expecting the usual foot soreness and knee tendon pain, and theres NONE!!! My legs feel tired but my feet and knee joints feel like I spent the day swimming, not jumping 2 feet into the air and crashing down hundreds of time in a few hours. THIS HAS BEEN A REVELATION. I will wear arch insoles for the rest of my life and I can't believe I didn't start wearing them years ago.

    My advice for every flat footed person on EARTH... it doesn't matter if you play volleyball, basketball, badminton or poker, GET ARCH INSOLES. Stop by any pharmacy like a Walgreens or Eckerd or Rite Aid. There will be different styles, gel insoles, foam or rubber. Try 'em on and get the one you like. It will only cost about ten dollars and it will CHANGE YOUR LIFE. Any flat footed person here have a job as a waiter or clerk where you have to stand all day? Get arch insoles and say goodbye to the pain forever. (Well you still have to work at the job but at least your feet won't hurt anymore. I work at a supermarket so I know the pain)

    Last point: Your podiatrist can make custom insoles for you, but they'll probably be hard plastic; fully rigid insoles aren't as comfy. Plus I don't think typical health insurance covers custom insoles. Instead of playing 100+ dollars for a custom rigid insole, grab the ten dollar foam ones that are nearly as good and can flex with the shoe.
    Good point indeed, I don't use custom insoles but I use custom orthos for my feet and if I had to spend a 1000 dollars on my feet. I will..just because it's part of your body and you want to take care of it. I would agree with you on the arch supports because they are fairly cheap and from the sounds of this product it seems to be quite good. Here I will also suggest a way to relieve from high arch, flat feet,etc. The answer is...custom orthos. I know they are very expensive, ranging to the few hundred dollar mark. To be honest I have to say using these my feet don't get sore after a 30 minute walk around the streets. They help me in badminton because of the support on my feet. And if you have a health insurance that covers medical things such as braces, orthos for teeth,feet etc. Try to ask if that company will cover the cost of the orthos. I just think that custom orthos might be better than the arch supports, I may be right I may be wrong. I thought about this, everyone has different feet so a typical arch support might not be able to support everyone's need. So that's why I suggest trying custom orthos. Or just buy these arch supports to see how they go. And yes..definately get these arch supports if you don't want to spend too much on custom orthos.

  17. #187
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    i actualy think flatfooted does have to do with athleticism. if your born to be a good athlete. you really dont need to be taught to move on your tippy toes? lol i forgot what the front of ur foot is called.

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