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View Poll Results: Are you flat-footed?

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  • Yes.

    534 45.33%
  • No.

    644 54.67%
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  1. #18
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    Default percentage of BF members with flat feet

    The percentage of BF members reporting that they have flat feet is quite disproportionate to that estimated by medical journals of the population who have the condition; c.10% of people are thought to have true flat feet, of which a very small number have rigid flat feet (where a proper arch is not developed as the person stands on their toes), and about 1 in 10 of the population have mobile/physiological flat feet where the arch reappears when the big toe is extended upwards or when the said person is standing on their toes. Probably nobody here has rigid flat feet, as it would be very painful to play badminton. There isn't much literature on specific disadvantages of having flat feet; indeed much of it suggests there are none, save an increased susceptiblity to injury.
    So to those who think they have flat feet try the following tests:

    i). Wet your feet and then stand on a flat, dry surface that will leave an imprint of your foot. If your foot leaves a nearly complete imprint, as in image 1 below, you have flat feet.

    ii). Lift your big toe up and/or stand on your toes; if your arch does not appear, you've got problems . If the arch does appear and you leave an imprint like image 1, you should try using a straight shaped shoe with an antipronation post or footbridge, that is, a dense material along the inner edge of the shoe to prevent excessive pronation. Specialised running shops often sell this type of "motion control" shoe.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #19
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    Default

    Incidentally, I thought I had posted a query about having hammer-toes, and the effect this might have on agility about court (?). I know there are some BF members who have studied medicine; anyone know anything about this condition (i.e. treatment, how it affects performance etc.)?

  3. #20
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    Originally posted by shuttleguru
    i dont agree that you cannot keep up with others if u r flat footed, i am not brilliant, but im in the top 8 in my country, and i am able to keep um
    You're in the top 8? Is your name any of the following?

    England, NationalRankings; position 8:

    Nicholas Kidd (Men's singles)
    Graham HURRELL (Men's Doubles)
    Leah TARRY (Women's singles)
    Emma HENDRY (W.'s Doubles)
    Chris ROE (Mixed Doubles)
    Lesley PAINE (Mixed Doubles)

    If not, would you mind clarifying which rank you currently hold?
    -Sorry for thread-jacking.

  4. #21
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    Thread jacking posts are strongly discouraged and run the possiblilty of being deledted...The above two posts will most likely be deleted after 24-48 hours.

  5. #22
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    Originally posted by Kurodo
    my friend played badminton and is now running on x-country... hes flat footed...
    There are lots of running shoes which are meant for people with flat foot who overpronates. These shoes, known as Motion Control shoes, are very firm, and they provide extra support to prevent your feet from rolling in as you're running. If your friend chooses his running shoes correctly, he wouldn't be at any disadvantage while running cross country.

    However, badminton is a different story. There are no badminton shoes (at least I haven't heard of any yet) which prevents your feet from pronating if you have flat foot. It probably is fair to say that badminton players who are flat footed will be at a much more disadvantage from runners who are flat footed. (unless a special pair of orthodics has been ordered from a Pediatrisian)

    By the way, here's another note of interest. While we're in the topic of comparing running and badminton, note that in running, if you're flat footed runner who overpronates, you have a very high chance of suffering from various running injuries (from achilles tendenitis to runner knees) if you don't wear a good pair of running shoes that prevent you from over pronating. But from all the discussions above, it seems that in badminton, people who have flat foot do not have a higher probability of receiving injuries while playing badminton.
    Last edited by edwin; 09-16-2003 at 08:58 PM.

  6. #23
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    I have normal arches on my feet and I don't think being flat footed is a handicap. Have a question though... Do any of you also get callouses from playing? I've developed ones under my big toe and the balls of my small toes. How do i prevent this? Socks? Shoes? Sorry to digress...

  7. #24
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    I am definitely flat-footed and I always thought it was because I was too heavy as a kid and just weigh myself down so the arch disappeared. anyway, being flat-footed for me just means I have to train my leg muscles a little more to compensate for it. I think that is why I have an abnormally large calf and shin when compared to other people.

  8. #25
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    Default Bruce Lee had flat feet

    For the flat-footed people, you might like to know that Kung Fu Legend Bruce Lee had flat feet (he was also exempted from military service because of this) and his athletic ability was legendary. I used to think that I myself have flat feet as well, but the wet test indicates my feet are normal. Nevertheless, my arches are very shallow and I don't run as fast as my friends who have higher arches.

    Since we're talking about feet, I wonder if anyone develops corns or calluses after a badminton session? I have very skinny feet and my big toes tend to develop corns after a badminton session. Does anyone know how this can be prevented? My shoes fit very well and are very comfortable (YY SHB89) and I wear Thorlos padded socks.

  9. #26
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    i've feet that r rather flat too.
    but that doesn't stop me from playing badminton and it's not really true that one will experience pain on his feet (flat) after rigorous or continuous exercise.
    has to depend on ur threshold of pain too.
    in some of my country's army cases, those with severe flat feet are given less-demanding postings... but most of them go thru the same kind of training too.
    anyway, i myself had taken part in half-marathons before and i see no prob with it.

    btw, to test whether u have flat feet.
    go to any swimming pool, go dip ur feet in, then put in on the concrete surface besides the pool...
    u will witness for urself as to whether u possess total flat feet or not.
    if the whole feet area is wet, u are most likely to be one.

  10. #27
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    Default Oh yes I am

    My feet look just like the one in the picture showing the inner foot. Real Flat. You can't even slide a paper under it. What Arch?!?

  11. #28
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    then sad to say, u really have flat feet. but that shouldn't stop u from daily rigorous activities...

    does ur feet give u any significant movement problems?

  12. #29
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    i know that i'm flat footed, but, as a junior i was one of the top long jumpers in the country. 6.30 metres when i was 14 yrs. i think that flat footedness (for me) increases muscle fatigue, so if ur really fit, then im guessing u wouldnt feel any problems.

  13. #30
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    Default arches and pronation

    im from california and i work at the athlests foot we have a machine that tells you if you have high arches or flat feet and it tells you if you pronate(roll in when you walk or run) or suppenate(roll out).then if you roll in you want a shoe that has a stability post on the inside, its a grayish colored hard dense foam on the inside of the shoe what it does is it controls the motion of rolling in and forces you to walk or run straight. A lot of time ill have pediatrist(foot doctor) recconmend high arch insolse for people with flat feet , at first it may feel quite uncomfortable because it feels like something is poking your foot but it builds up your arch and then you get used to it .

  14. #31
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    Default "Podiatrist" & "Orthodicts"

    If you find that your feet has no arch (aka flat-footed) or a high arch, it is best to go see a foot specialist a "Podiatrist" (pod as in foot) who will recommend a custom built in-sole for your shoes (these are not the same as the ones off the shelf).

    The Podiatrist will make a cast of your feet in a "neutral position", and then create a rigid to semi-rigid in-sole for your footwear. Each pair or orthodicts are made specifically for dress shoes (ex/ women hi-heels), everyday walking shoes, athletic footwear, etc. because the support of the in-sole depends on the level of flex required and the activity.

    At first, it will feel like a rock in you shoe, but after a few weeks/months, you don't even notice it until you take your shoes off and walk around bare feet. Wearing the orthodicts during badminton did not decrease my level of play nor decrease my mobility.

    This process is not cheap, and it will depend on if you are a youth and your family's medical coverage. If you are still growing (a youth), you may need a pair of orthodicts every year, otherwise every two years for an adult, or based on your level of wear & tear on the in-soles. When I got my feet first casted, I got 2 pairs at a cheaper price. The only time I notice it is when I get a new pair of badminton shoes and it takes 3-6 sessions before the orthodicts is firmly seated into the runners.
    Last edited by Break-My-String; 01-03-2004 at 06:48 AM.

  15. #32
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    Default Orthodicts

    I forgot to add...

    The orthodicts can be easily taken out from one badminton shoe and slipped into another, it is not permanently placed in one shoe.

  16. #33
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    what effect does the custom orthodicts have? does it "heal" the flatfooted-ness? or just more comfortable?

  17. #34
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    i think it is the latter. orthodicts would help redistribute the stress profile of the subject foots to conventional shoes.

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