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  1. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jun Wei View Post
    How about a partner that is basically non - existent at the net? There are some players after years of playing is basically non-existent at the net. He can hit the shuttle into the net for a easy kill. And every time he is at the net, the shuttle will NEVER get lifted. it is either tapped or put away. Can be quite frustrating at times.
    dont take such a game seriously.

  2. #36
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    Guys, any tips on how to give signal to your double partner when doing cross-court smash or drop so that they can cover you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by danilo5753 View Post
    Guys, any tips on how to give signal to your double partner when doing cross-court smash or drop so that they can cover you?
    There's not so much a signal to give to your partner, except just knowing when to. After playing with a regular partner you can start to read and predict their shots without even seeing them (ie they're behind you). It really just comes down to the non verbal communication that you either have naturally with your partner or gain from playing together. But there is one thing that you can tell your partner, and that is: to stand slightly further away from you then normal, ie you're not standing directly behind one another but diagonally. Hm this is harder to explain than I thought; but tell them to not stand in an all out, one in front of another but skewed diagonally so they can easily rotate out. Hope that helps!

  4. #38
    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    There's a situation that beg me to differ on how effective a shot can be.

    I serve, opponent drive it ( slightly upward ) toward my partner's backhand, and he backhand smash it.

    Most of the time, opponents could put it away on the other side which empty since I'm still at the front. We've discussed about this but my partner still doing it and I have to be ready for worst-case scenario ( miss-hit, half-court, BAM! My face swell... ).

    Any suggestion?

  5. #39
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^ If he's truly backhand smashing it, there's no way your opponent would be able to put it away.

  6. #40
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    Firstly, are you serving to the 't' or out wide? If it's out wide, then the opposition can drive down-the line and put you & your partner (y&yp) on the defensive. Unless your partner has one hell of a backhand drive, then he may have to lift.

    If you're serving to the 't', then any pushes and/or drives to y&yp's rear corners should be intercepted mid-court by your partner and driven down-the-line. Similarly, this should put your opponents on the defensive.

    Secondly, if the shuttle is going to be hit by your (rear-court) partner, you need to take a couple of steps back from the service line. This is precisely so that you can intercept driven responses. If your partner does a drop, you have time to go back in again.

    Finally, your opposition should never be able to hit y&yp's smashes downwards. If your partner is struggling with angle, he should try hitting with 90% power and concentrate on getting a tighter angle to the tape.

  7. #41
    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    ^ If he's truly backhand smashing it, there's no way your opponent would be able to put it away.
    He did and I did mention 'most of the time' din't I ? A good player like you should know a smash won't always ends a rally. Especially against a very good player.

  8. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeverWalkAlone View Post
    This is quite an interesting post. i agree with the first point. Tall players do tend be slower when shifting the weights and turning. However, i don't agree that their smashes are less powerful. i have encountered a tall player who has a powerful smash and good reach as you have said. he's a tough opponent to play with. the only weakness i found is that he tends to be slow when turning to take shuttles. also, with tall players, since the smashes are steep, it's important to improve on smash returns. Weak and slightly low smash returns give them opportunity to downright kill the shuttle.
    Only just saw this response to my previous comment.

    I was only generalising when I said that tall players I have encountered are generally not exceptionally powerful. Of course, there are exceptions. Just as there are many shorter players that are not very agile.

  9. #43
    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Line & Length View Post
    Firstly, are you serving to the 't' or out wide? If it's out wide, then the opposition can drive down-the line and put you & your partner (y&yp) on the defensive. Unless your partner has one hell of a backhand drive, then he may have to lift.

    If you're serving to the 't', then any pushes and/or drives to y&yp's rear corners should be intercepted mid-court by your partner and driven down-the-line. Similarly, this should put your opponents on the defensive.

    Secondly, if the shuttle is going to be hit by your (rear-court) partner, you need to take a couple of steps back from the service line. This is precisely so that you can intercept driven responses. If your partner does a drop, you have time to go back in again.

    Finally, your opposition should never be able to hit y&yp's smashes downwards. If your partner is struggling with angle, he should try hitting with 90% power and concentrate on getting a tighter angle to the tape.
    Based on your 1st paragraph that shows a poor serve, which is not the case.

    On 2nd paragraph, this is the exact situation I'm trying to describe. "Should be intercepted mid-court by rear player and driven down-the-line." This kind of drives that makes us always had to work the rally before we have to be in attacking-mode again.

    So I did some research by watching local tourney's video of men's double final matches. To my surprise the rear player always drive it down almost like a smash.

    It seems like the drive backfired them, and in this case, us.

    So it makes me wonder how effective can this drive be. At the moment, as we have discussed, if such scenario will happen again I must step back a little and be ready for the shuttle.

    P/S : and yes, my partner has one hell of a backhand drive

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by M3Series View Post
    There's a situation that beg me to differ on how effective a shot can be.

    I serve, opponent drive it ( slightly upward ) toward my partner's backhand, and he backhand smash it.

    Most of the time, opponents could put it away on the other side which empty since I'm still at the front. We've discussed about this but my partner still doing it and I have to be ready for worst-case scenario ( miss-hit, half-court, BAM! My face swell... ).

    Any suggestion?
    If I’ve visualized what you’re saying correctly, here are some suggestions.

    When your opponent returns your serve by driving it to your partners backhand, you should still be in attacking formation and standing slightly further back from the T. Assuming your partner executes the smash well, it will be difficult for them to drive it into the open court. However, the important thing to note is that it is YOUR responsibility to cover the cross court drive. Your partner will struggle to execute a BH smash and still have time to turn and cover the other side too. You need to be able to intercept any drives cross court – hence why standing slight further back will help. I accept it is not easy to intercept a cross court drive but it can be done. Even if you try and get your racquet to it, you can play a drop…. If anything, it will make your opponents think twice about driving past you. So, remember the basic things… racquet up, stay low and anticipate!

    Obviously if you are good at covering the drives and are a threat to your opponents, they may opt for the lift instead which your partner shouldn’t have a problem with.

    Also, I would suggest that your partner mixes up his shots a bit to keep them guessing, BH smashes are only good when they surprise your opponents or is intended to just maintain the attack and shouldn’t be assumed to be winners unless your name is Taufik Hidayat! It’s good to mix a few drops, drives and even attacking clears.

  11. #45
    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    If I’ve visualized what you’re saying correctly, here are some suggestions.

    When your opponent returns your serve by driving it to your partners backhand, you should still be in attacking formation and standing slightly further back from the T. Assuming your partner executes the smash well, it will be difficult for them to drive it into the open court. However, the important thing to note is that it is YOUR responsibility to cover the cross court drive. Your partner will struggle to execute a BH smash and still have time to turn and cover the other side too. You need to be able to intercept any drives cross court – hence why standing slight further back will help. I accept it is not easy to intercept a cross court drive but it can be done. Even if you try and get your racquet to it, you can play a drop…. If anything, it will make your opponents think twice about driving past you. So, remember the basic things… racquet up, stay low and anticipate!

    Obviously if you are good at covering the drives and are a threat to your opponents, they may opt for the lift instead which your partner shouldn’t have a problem with.

    Also, I would suggest that your partner mixes up his shots a bit to keep them guessing, BH smashes are only good when they surprise your opponents or is intended to just maintain the attack and shouldn’t be assumed to be winners unless your name is Taufik Hidayat! It’s good to mix a few drops, drives and even attacking clears.
    That's what me and my partner has agreed upon at the moment. Just looking for more options. If they exist...

  12. #46
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by M3Series View Post
    He did and I did mention 'most of the time' din't I ? A good player like you should know a smash won't always ends a rally. Especially against a very good player.
    Ah, I see... he can't be backhand smashing a slightly upward drive to his backhand. That'd be a counter drive.

    Then as the post above, he has to mix up his speed and trajectory a bit. His opponents are expecting and preparing for drives already so he needs to learn to fast drop down the middle or slightly to the non receiver side. Or even backhand clear to the weaker player, or down the middle back if they're standing side by side.

    In other words, have some shot variations. Don't just always drive, this is a game situation, not a practice or a drill after all.
    Last edited by visor; 07-25-2013 at 09:48 AM.

  13. #47
    Regular Member M3Series's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Ah, I see... he can't be backhand smashing a slightly upward drive to his backhand. That'd be a counter drive.

    Then as the post above, he has to mix up his speed and trajectory a bit. His opponents are expecting and preparing for drives already so he needs to learn to fast drop down the middle or slightly to the non receiver side. Or even backhand clear to the weaker player, or down the middle back if they're standing side by side.

    In other words, have some shot variations. Don't just always drive, this is a game situation, not a practice or a drill after all.
    I know what counter drive is and it's not bro. Because he's a bit short and the 'slightly upward drive' almost like a lift to him except that it's fast and the cork's still facing upward.

    And yes I agree with your suggestion by varying the shots. Thnx man

  14. #48
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Huh? First you say backhand smash mostly, now you're saying the cork faces upward? And it's not a drive, not a clear. Bro, you sure make it tough for us to help you.

    But whatever it is, just tell him to be unpredictable.
    Last edited by visor; 07-25-2013 at 11:08 PM.

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by M3Series View Post
    ME : "Y U NO SMASH?"
    HIM :" RELAX BRO, JUST A GAME"
    ME : *face-palm*

    what i usually do with these kind of partner is that I'll try to push him to the front court and start to cover the backcourt most of the time. to do that:

    1) Lift the shuttle deep behind and hope the opponent do a drop shot and said ' YOURS!'
    2) Before the serve starts, I'll tell him to cover the front
    3) Ask him to play at the net since he doesn't like to smash
    4) Leave the court and ask him to find a replacement

    But the thing is, usually with this typical kind of human-being, when they play at the front court, they love to lift the bird and we back to defensive again. Agree? So what's next? I'll do the no.4
    Reviving an old thread.

    Actually I do the exact opposite and push my ignorant partner to the back. It gets very tiring and frustrating when said partner continually lifts *everything* from the net if left alone there...

    and yeah, never play with the guy again!

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