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  1. #35
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pakito View Post
    I can see 2 of them are borrowed from yoga postures which I like.
    Why?
    .............

  2. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Why?
    .............
    After a hectic bout of training or duel, these postures releases the latic acid trapped in the muscle during and after strenuous sports, which in turns helps reliefs muscles of tension, stress and pain. In fact, my uncle once saw the diminutive jumping jack of Indonesia, Hastomo Arbi who came to Penang to play friendly games. My uncle saw him doing the 'inverted pose' (see pic below) with his feet in the air. Curious to find out why he did that, he later told my uncle that he was jumping so much in the air, he needed to get the blood back to his upper body and that's why he performed that pose during the break for the decider match. Name:  images.jpg
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  3. #37
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    That's just....weird. There's no such thing as having too little blood in your upper body because you jumped around a bit....all that pose does is relax your upper body...

  4. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    That's just....weird. There's no such thing as having too little blood in your upper body because you jumped around a bit....all that pose does is relax your upper body...
    Agreed. Blood pressure has a pretty constant ratio cross the body because there is only 1 pump.
    The only reason I can think of to alter this balance slightly is after eating a lot of food where more blood flows into the digestive tracks.

  5. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerv2 View Post
    Agreed. Blood pressure has a pretty constant ratio cross the body because there is only 1 pump.
    The only reason I can think of to alter this balance slightly is after eating a lot of food where more blood flows into the digestive tracks.
    not necessarily! if its constant ratio there wouldnt be any problems of poor blood circulation existing..
    jump out of bad from a horizontal position into a vertical position immediately some people can black out from it!...
    signs of pins and needles in hands, legs, feet etc is also attributed to poor blood circulation..

  6. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruffle View Post
    Hmmm. Stretching may make you feel better, but there is absolutely no accredited research which shows that it is beneficial in reducing post-exercise pain or stiffness, or in any way improves performance. In fact, there is a substantial body of research which shows that stretching before exercise is actually counter-productive.
    more than that!

    stretching helps muscle recovery from wear/tear damage. you can take a search for "stretching activates muscle satellite cells" which are muscle stem cells..

  7. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by vajrasattva View Post
    not necessarily! if its constant ratio there wouldnt be any problems of poor blood circulation existing..
    jump out of bad from a horizontal position into a vertical position immediately some people can black out from it!...
    signs of pins and needles in hands, legs, feet etc is also attributed to poor blood circulation..
    Of course there are exemptions to everything. Poor blood circulation is a medical condition. Could be due to low blood pressure also. Our discussion is more towards the normal situation.

  8. #42
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    I do feel that these postures help in aiding posture balance and decreasing likelihood of injuries. As to what the horse said about the blood going back to his upper body, I am not sure but just wanted to share. However, there are cases of tournaments dragging on so long and hectic that players can feel light headed due to intense stress on the body for prolong periods, though not necessarily due to jumping alone. That is also why when the body is stressed out, you can't get up immediately or you will get dizzy. Maybe this 'inverted posture' does help remedy the low blood pressure situation. However, I am also thinking that a person who does not necessarily have low blood pressure can have fainting spells when his body cannot last a particular grueling match.

  9. #43
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    Blood pressure is not the same throughout the whole body. For a start, the normal blood pressure of 120/80 mm/Hg indicates that the blood pressure leaving the heart to other parts of the body is higher (120) than when compared to blood returning to the heart from other parts of the body (80).

    Excerpt:

    When you exercise, your working muscles need more blood and oxygen to function. This increased demand forces your heart to beat faster, thus pumping out more blood with each beat. When your heart rate and blood volume increases, so does the pressure of the blood on the arterial walls. Therefore, while you are actually engaging in exercise, your systolic blood pressure will temporarily rise, and your diastolic, or bottom number, will stay the same or drop slightly. The benefit of exercise on blood pressure occurs after physical activity. After a bout of exercise, the blood vessels throughout your body dilate. This relaxation of the vessels creates wider openings for the blood to flow through, therefore reducing the amount of resistance and pressure on the walls. This dilation can last for several hours after exercise, resulting in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings.

    Take note that each individual's fitness level is different. For some, those unable to cope, their body will be constantly begging to return to the recovering phase or dilation phase, and if your opponent is fitter than you, and the match has a long way to go, you are playing in vessel dilation phase and low blood pressure, hence the dizziness. Some will even see snow in their vision. Of course, if you are as fit as LD or LCW, it's not a problem.

    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/38...#ixzz2MUJ6d64U
    Last edited by Pakito; 03-03-2013 at 08:49 AM.

  10. #44
    Regular Member j4ckie's Avatar
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    It's simply overexertion of the cardiovascular system, meaning your body is not capable of delivering enough oxygen to all parts anymore. That's what causes several symptoms of fatigue normally (lack of carbohydrates being another huge factor). In extreme cases of fatigue, your brain will not be supplied adequately anymore (with either oxygen and/or carbohydrates) which may cause visual symptoms (bright/colored spots, blurry vision...), and eventually cause collapse/fainting as a last-resort safety measure, returning you to a horizontal position to increase blood flow to the brain while stopping all conscious muscle activity to reduce any further strain.
    If you have those symptoms and feel light-headed, that yoga pose will actually help. Playing on afterwards is dangerous though and should not be done even by professional athletes (who more often than not have no idea what's going on in their body anyway and just rely on coaches' expertise or dangerous half-knowledge).

  11. #45
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    My point exactly.
    I don't know if this helps, but I have been training with an aid of a banana to last longer and exert my stamina and endurance. Ok maybe a bunch of bananas but just a few bites after every grueling match. I am sharing this because I find that this is especially beneficial for those who have laid off badminton for some time but planning to come back actively into this grueling sport (MS), this helps.

    Quote Originally Posted by j4ckie View Post
    It's simply overexertion of the cardiovascular system, meaning your body is not capable of delivering enough oxygen to all parts anymore. That's what causes several symptoms of fatigue normally (lack of carbohydrates being another huge factor). In extreme cases of fatigue, your brain will not be supplied adequately anymore (with either oxygen and/or carbohydrates) which may cause visual symptoms (bright/colored spots, blurry vision...), and eventually cause collapse/fainting as a last-resort safety measure, returning you to a horizontal position to increase blood flow to the brain while stopping all conscious muscle activity to reduce any further strain.
    If you have those symptoms and feel light-headed, that yoga pose will actually help. Playing on afterwards is dangerous though and should not be done even by professional athletes (who more often than not have no idea what's going on in their body anyway and just rely on coaches' expertise or dangerous half-knowledge).

  12. #46
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    http://www.health.harvard.edu/newswe..._100_foods.htm

    @Pakito

    If you look up glycemic index and glycemic load, you'll find that bananas are not very effective for instant release of energy. Better would be energy bars, bagels, sweet yams, etc
    Last edited by visor; 03-03-2013 at 09:50 AM.

  13. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    http://www.health.harvard.edu/newswe..._100_foods.htm

    @Pakito

    If you look up glycemic index and glycemic load, you'll find that bananas are not very effective for instant release of energy. Better would be energy bars, bagels, sweet yams, etc
    Appreciated.

  14. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pakito View Post
    Blood pressure is not the same throughout the whole body. For a start, the normal blood pressure of 120/80 mm/Hg indicates that the blood pressure leaving the heart to other parts of the body is higher (120) than when compared to blood returning to the heart from other parts of the body (80).
    Correct. That is why I said the ratio is constant and not the pressure is constant throughout.

  15. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogerv2 View Post
    Correct. That is why I said the ratio is constant and not the pressure is constant throughout.
    then this could be an interesting read

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17181675

  16. #50
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Was a time I remember, they told us "coffee is not good for your heart."
    Then "research" showed that it is actually good.
    A few years later, guess what? Right! Not good again...

    Bananas, margarine, butter, and even green tea have been on the flip-flop bandwagon. Feel free to add to this list.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    Was a time I remember, they told us "coffee is not good for your heart."
    Then "research" showed that it is actually good.
    A few years later, guess what? Right! Not good again...

    Bananas, margarine, butter, and even green tea have been on the flip-flop bandwagon. Feel free to add to this list.
    bier and wine is gud.... the more the merrier

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