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    Default Voltric 3 or voltric 5

    Which 1 to go for voltric 3 or voltric 5. I am a bit confused since vt 3 is head heavy but also has some 'Hold' property according to the yonex selection chart,but on the other hand vt 5 is much head heavier in comparision to vt 3 and also heavier than vt7,vt60,vt70 but is does nt have that 'Hold' property..I an offensive player hence i am want to go for a head heavy racket but sud i compromise on that hold property and go for vt5 or compromise the head heaviness of vt5 and go for vt3..please suggest

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    First thing is you need to see how much "head-heavy" you can handle.

    I am not sure how much that hold/repulsion means in a a game. But I feel all of it depends on your style of play. I have gone through many posts on the forum which suggest that Arc 10 (more towards the hold side) is used by singles players.

    If I was selecting a racquet I'd focus more on the north-south (HH-HL) rather than hold-repulsion for my racquet selection. Again that depends on your level of your play and what role you play (if doubles). IMO a 'hold' racquet can be as offensive as a 'repulsion' racquet in the hands of the right person.

    Given the Yonex racquet chart, rather than worrying about the hold property, I would suggest you to think whether you need faster response but lesser power (VT3), or slower response but more power (VT5).

    If you want me to generalize, then I could say VT3 would make a more suitable doubles racquet than VT5, but of course it might not hold true with you (there are people who can play all-round doubles game with VT ZF too). Good luck with your selection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayshh View Post
    First thing is you need to see how much "head-heavy" you can handle.

    I am not sure how much that hold/repulsion means in a a game. But I feel all of it depends on your style of play. I have gone through many posts on the forum which suggest that Arc 10 (more towards the hold side) is used by singles players.

    If I was selecting a racquet I'd focus more on the north-south (HH-HL) rather than hold-repulsion for my racquet selection. Again that depends on your level of your play and what role you play (if doubles). IMO a 'hold' racquet can be as offensive as a 'repulsion' racquet in the hands of the right person.

    Given the Yonex racquet chart, rather than worrying about the hold property, I would suggest you to think whether you need faster response but lesser power (VT3), or slower response but more power (VT5).

    If you want me to generalize, then I could say VT3 would make a more suitable doubles racquet than VT5, but of course it might not hold true with you (there are people who can play all-round doubles game with VT ZF too). Good luck with your selection.
    my current racket is isometric zeta which i think is a bit head heavy or even balanced ..apart from dis racket i also have nanospeed alpha x which is head light..when i play with isometric zeta i can smash harder but with my ns aplha x i cant do so..hence i think the more head heavy racket i buy d more it will help me to play offensive game and smash harder....

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    In our club one of the guys uses a VT5, for all his doubles games. So VT 5 can be a capable doubles racquet too. If you can manage to use the racquet for quick exchanges around the net also with VT5, then that is the racquet you should go for. Also since you want a racquet that helps you play a more offensive game VT 5 should be your pick.

    However, before making the final decision, do pick up the racquets, swing them to get a feel. If you can borrow either of them for a game or two you will get a much better idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayshh View Post
    In our club one of the guys uses a VT5, for all his doubles games. So VT 5 can be a capable doubles racquet too. If you can manage to use the racquet for quick exchanges around the net also with VT5, then that is the racquet you should go for. Also since you want a racquet that helps you play a more offensive game VT 5 should be your pick.

    However, before making the final decision, do pick up the racquets, swing them to get a feel. If you can borrow either of them for a game or two you will get a much better idea.
    ohkkkk ....now i am more biased towards VT5 specially because of head heaviness which can be compared with the AT 900..by the way thank u for the advice...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayshh View Post
    In our club one of the guys uses a VT5, for all his doubles games. So VT 5 can be a capable doubles racquet too. If you can manage to use the racquet for quick exchanges around the net also with VT5, then that is the racquet you should go for. Also since you want a racquet that helps you play a more offensive game VT 5 should be your pick.

    However, before making the final decision, do pick up the racquets, swing them to get a feel. If you can borrow either of them for a game or two you will get a much better idea.
    I just bought a voltric 5...it is strung with the practice gut..I am a hard hitter but voltric 5 has let me down ,the samshes are not hard as i hit with my isometric zeta (strung with bg 65)..and also i have a little pain in my arms. Is it due the practice gut,or the excessive head heaviness of the racket...I never sufferd from such pain playing with my isometric zeta...

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    Quote Originally Posted by darpanchoudhary View Post
    I just bought a voltric 5...it is strung with the practice gut..I am a hard hitter but voltric 5 has let me down ,the samshes are not hard as i hit with my isometric zeta (strung with bg 65)..and also i have a little pain in my arms. Is it due the practice gut,or the excessive head heaviness of the racket...I never sufferd from such pain playing with my isometric zeta...
    with my personal experience and from what i've read, your arm hurts because you're expecting the same power from the new racket but wasn't able to generate that power, which usually means that you need to adjust your swing speed to the possibly stiffer vt5. maybe your swing mechanics or maybe you're just not used to it yet. give it more time for your arm to adjust to the change in racket. maybe string the new racket with bg65 at the same tension, that will make the comparison less biased.

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    Agreed. But those beginner racket (2U, i guess) normally come with factory strung.VT5 is lighter but head heavy compare to his existing racket. He really need to play more to adjust the swing timing... I can play better with NS990 (BG80P 26lbs) than VT80 (BG66UM 26ilb) and TI10 (BG66UM 23ilb). It could be string type and tension. So, can't really comments.

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    @darpanchoudhary - Try not to swing or play with VT 5 as you play with your ISO Zeta.

    There could be a difference in weight, stringing, head-heaviness and flex, and so you will have to change the way you swing. Once you get used to the swing of the racquet your game will be back. Also, try Paul's (badminton-coach) wrist exercises, it may help.

    I recently experienced similar symptoms when I switched to an oval-headed but head-heavy racquet. At least VT 5 is Isometric frame. Initially, I found it difficult to hit the sweet-spot exactly and when I didn't, the birdie wasn't going anywhere. No smash, no clears, and I had little bit of soreness in my shoulders. I was coming from an even balance and flexible racquet. I've had the racquet now for more than a month, and have no trouble smashing or clearing. I guess every racquet with slightly different attribute will take some time to get used to.

    But if you concentrate on just getting the strokes right with the new racquet, you will get used to it faster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    with my personal experience and from what i've read, your arm hurts because you're expecting the same power from the new racket but wasn't able to generate that power, which usually means that you need to adjust your swing speed to the possibly stiffer vt5. maybe your swing mechanics or maybe you're just not used to it yet. give it more time for your arm to adjust to the change in racket. maybe string the new racket with bg65 at the same tension, that will make the comparison less biased.
    I got my racket strung with bg 65 ...but still the same problem exists ..my smashes are no more powerful,no clears nothing at allllllllllllll..and now its almost 1 month since i am using dis racket and the sad part is that i nowadays feel alot more comfortable playing with the nanospeed alpha x......

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayshh View Post
    @darpanchoudhary - Try not to swing or play with VT 5 as you play with your ISO Zeta.

    There could be a difference in weight, stringing, head-heaviness and flex, and so you will have to change the way you swing. Once you get used to the swing of the racquet your game will be back. Also, try Paul's (badminton-coach) wrist exercises, it may help.

    I recently experienced similar symptoms when I switched to an oval-headed but head-heavy racquet. At least VT 5 is Isometric frame. Initially, I found it difficult to hit the sweet-spot exactly and when I didn't, the birdie wasn't going anywhere. No smash, no clears, and I had little bit of soreness in my shoulders. I was coming from an even balance and flexible racquet. I've had the racquet now for more than a month, and have no trouble smashing or clearing. I guess every racquet with slightly different attribute will take some time to get used to.

    But if you concentrate on just getting the strokes right with the new racquet, you will get used to it faster.
    are medium stiff rackets hard to adapt to????? What shud i do please suggest..i feel like hell playing with the voltric 5

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    As you go up the stiffness in shaft, you will find it harder to adapt and generate power. I would give up if I went to stiff from flex directly and couldn't adapt in a month. Generally, mid-flex is not that tough, especially with rackets with heavier heads. That's because heavier heads have more potential to bend the shaft... A months time should be quite sufficient to adapt actually, but that depends on how many days you play in a week. I play almost everyday, so 2-3 weeks were sufficient.

    BTW, do you go straight for games? Or do some tossing and warm-up? Even if you do get into the game, try not to get "into" it, consciously try and focus on your hitting. That's what drills are for instead, may be try drilling for overhead clears. If it still doesn't work out, may be you can sell it off and buy a flex shaft racquet??
    Last edited by sayshh; 11-07-2012 at 12:19 AM.

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    You may need to shorten the swing of your arm with a stiffer and more head-heavy racquet. If you persist with the longer, more pronounced swing that is normally played with a medium-flex racquet, you can end up hurting your arm/wrist etc. A longer swing with a stiffer racquet will certainly put your timing off.

    Instead, spend more time with the racquet at practise drills, full-length clears, drives, half-smashes (NOT full-powered smashes; the idea is to get your body to acquire the correct timing for the new racquet) and focus consciously on short swings, a loose grip that tightens on impact etc. Also remember to practise pronation. A long, pronounced swing often masks incorrect pronation habits.

    Strings and tension can also make a huge difference. Factor stringing is often a total dud. I'd recommend you restring your racquet at your normal preferred tension but maybe down by a lb or so to compensate for the stiffness. If you aren't sure about the string tension, I'd suggest you begin with BG65 at 22/24, pre-stretched. If it is not prestretched, then string at around 24/26 and allow for a few day's worth of play before the strings obtain their settled-in tension.

    Again, I must remind you that these suggestions are only based on the few things you have mentioned yet. But I hope it helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayshh View Post
    As you go up the stiffness in shaft, you will find it harder to adapt and generate power. I would give up if I went to stiff from flex directly and couldn't adapt in a month. Generally, mid-flex is not that tough, especially with rackets with heavier heads. That's because heavier heads have more potential to bend the shaft... A months time should be quite sufficient to adapt actually, but that depends on how many days you play in a week. I play almost everyday, so 2-3 weeks were sufficient.

    BTW, do you go straight for games? Or do some tossing and warm-up? Even if you do get into the game, try not to get "into" it, consciously try and focus on your hitting. That's what drills are for instead, may be try drilling for overhead clears. If it still doesn't work out, may be you can sell it off and buy a flex shaft racquet??
    no i do not go straight for games i do tossing nd warm up...i almost play everday but usually i play doubles ...thats it is difficult for me to adapt to the racket within a month or so..i think it will take me some more time. Today i fortunately got chance to play singles in which i didnot hit 2 much of smashes but played a normal game and i was comfortable wid my racket,the reason behind it being i didn't smashed with it many times wich i usually do.
    So the conclusion is that i need to swing my arm a bit slower to adapt to the med flex of my voltric 5's shaft correct???????

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    You may need to shorten the swing of your arm with a stiffer and more head-heavy racquet. If you persist with the longer, more pronounced swing that is normally played with a medium-flex racquet, you can end up hurting your arm/wrist etc. A longer swing with a stiffer racquet will certainly put your timing off.

    Instead, spend more time with the racquet at practise drills, full-length clears, drives, half-smashes (NOT full-powered smashes; the idea is to get your body to acquire the correct timing for the new racquet) and focus consciously on short swings, a loose grip that tightens on impact etc. Also remember to practise pronation. A long, pronounced swing often masks incorrect pronation habits.

    Strings and tension can also make a huge difference. Factor stringing is often a total dud. I'd recommend you restring your racquet at your normal preferred tension but maybe down by a lb or so to compensate for the stiffness. If you aren't sure about the string tension, I'd suggest you begin with BG65 at 22/24, pre-stretched. If it is not prestretched, then string at around 24/26 and allow for a few day's worth of play before the strings obtain their settled-in tension.

    Again, I must remind you that these suggestions are only based on the few things you have mentioned yet. But I hope it helps.
    it is strung at d same tension as my earlier rackets used to be..around 20 or 21lbs with bg 65,string is not a problem,the main problem is the med flex shaft.
    So the conclusion is that i need to swing my arm a bit slower to adapt to the med flex of my voltric 5's shaft correct???????

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    Quote Originally Posted by darpanchoudhary View Post
    So the conclusion is that i need to swing my arm a bit slower to adapt to the med flex of my voltric 5's shaft correct???????
    Yes take your time to swing, try to time the shot, get the sweet-spot and angle. Don't worry yet about hitting the killer smash, or generate power. Once you get the consistent hitting then try increasing you swing speed while maintaining good connection with shuttle. I'm sure you'll be much happier with the results. The fact that you liked this racquet to play singles (sans smashes) means that only in smashes you are trying too hard to get the killer power. That may be psychological expectation that having head-heavy racquet you can smash harder.. but just give it time. Even in doubles try to rally while making sure you keep consistent hitting as your priority rather than power and depth...

    When I was trying to get used my racquet, my doubles partners were mostly frustrated because I wasn't hitting hard enough smashes, or my clears to the back of the court... Although, initially (first day) I too tried to tried to play with it as my previous flex and even-balance racquet. In 3-4 days things didn't improve much more than 1st day, so I had a small doubt whether I had made a mistake in choosing the racquet. But I persisted, and now I feel that my play is more effortless with this racquet now.

    Hope this helps.

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    Vt5 come with thin frame where swing is much faster than yours previous racket.

    About smash, bg65 is soft feel. Try bg80 or bg80p.

    Nanagy 98 and bg66um is good candidate too, if you like med soft.

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