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  1. #1
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    Smile Convert from arm game to Wrist game

    Hi,
    Can any one tell me some practical working techniques to convert from an arm game to wrist game. Practice is the ultimate answer . But I want to know how exactly I need to practice it to change my game to wrist play..


    Thanks,
    Pramod.

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    Well it's a bit like going from playing tennis to badminton. As these are basic level techniques, you would be better off getting a coach or someone who can teach you the proper technique. You will find it difficult to learn from a few written tips from members on a forum and may even interpret it wrong.

    Also try youtube, there are some videos of the pronation and supination technique.

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    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    It's going to be like relearning how to tie your shoe laces so lots of practice is required. As R20190 says there is lots of stuff on youtube and is a good place to start.

    The first fundamental thing you will need to work on is your grip. Coaching Badminton has lots of clips on this. I would suggest getting a badminton racket and sitting at home and just watch. Once you have watched once, watch again and practice changing your grip, using your wrist and more importantly your fingers. Once you feel comfortable with this then you can go into arm motion.

    The more you practice at home the better you will become. You will get used to the weight, balance and grip size of the racket. Then you can take what you have learnt onto a court and hit some shuttles. Good luck

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    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Yep, as R20190 mentions, pronation and supination is paramount. Then comes timing and focus of your strike.

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    interestingly enough, my current instructor has moved me AWAY from supination and pronation for the moment. He did say pronation will be revisited as we progress but for now it's back to basics of the strike.

    I can't say I didn't have my doubts, but when I see the quality of the strike improving....it's hard to argue with improving results.

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    You're lucky! I remember when my instructor worked on my technique. Everything went haywire for a time.

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    Re-doing a golf swing three times from the ground up using three different swing philosophies made me realise a LOT of things when it comes to learning a motor skill.

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    I think +ve feed back is the key..every time you make a proper shot (using arm rotation) feel the difference (easiness, speed, crisp sound, length and control).

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    interesting topic.

    one of my students changed his racket from heavy 3U to medium 4U a while ago. as a result, he can no longer rely on the arm swing and have to emphasize on fast wrist action.

    another couple of points.

    - for mid court shots, reach high, as high as you can and aim steep. you can only do that with wrist stroke
    - for defense and drive, move your contact point as far forward as you can. many people are lazy and laid back and hit is very close to body. avoid that. move the contact point far far forward and you will soon realize you are relying more on your wrist to generate power.

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    I rememebr in one of the LJW videos he asks a student to keep the raquet arm extended (elbow not bent)..his point is that the extened arm ecourages arm rotation in addition to the better reach.

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    i agree with LJW on taht technique, not once mastered but to learn it. take the arm out of the equation whilst learning to use your wrist. dont worry if you cant hit a full length clear just get used to the feeling of using your wrist but once you can use the wrist effectively then bring in an arm swing which is needed to compliment the wrist. once this is good try doing it with the basic movements. this can be done for underarm strokes as well.

    good luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Borbor View Post
    interestingly enough, my current instructor has moved me AWAY from supination and pronation for the moment. He did say pronation will be revisited as we progress but for now it's back to basics of the strike.

    I can't say I didn't have my doubts, but when I see the quality of the strike improving....it's hard to argue with improving results.
    It's hard to 'move away' from it if you are using proper grip. If he's telling you to use a different grip to avoid pronation etc, then that sounds awful to me.

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    Nah. There s a method to the madness. Even he agrees pronation is a natural movement, but he is dialing me from a 10 back to a 2. For now tho, we are working on proper technique and sequence from the moment I decide to bring the racket fwd to strike the bird.

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    hi pramod,

    an experienced person in conversion here.. i was an arm player about 15 years ago, and converted to a wrist player about 10 yrs ago.. wasted 5 years of my life being an arm player.

    my first move to being a wrist player was to stop using that extremely aerodynamic/headlight racquet (masuka, atlanta 96) and move into something head heavier, that prompted some forearm muscle building.

    secondly, i ensured that i was conscious to be extremely light handed when gripping the racquet, and only tightening my grip upon contact with the shuttle with a light wrist snap action.

    third, i reminded myself that i'm whipping someone or swatting a fly

    and forth, going slow, and stopping the racquet in midair with no swinging follow through after hitting the shuttle. as an arm player, usually there are larger follow throughs, if one doesnt follow through, less power is generated, then you will start to concentrate on using wrist snaps to give the power you need..

    hope it helps!

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    It is always a combo of both. The wrist is the extra weapon. It gives you that extra 10% advantage if you use it well enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by extremenanopowe View Post
    It is always a combo of both. The wrist is the extra weapon. It gives you that extra 10% advantage if you use it well enough.
    If by wrist you mean pronation, 10% is HUGE underestimation

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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    If by wrist you mean pronation, 10% is HUGE underestimation
    I don't think pronation is "wrist technique". It's still arm. However, I think the "arm technique" people are talking about refers to the movement of our forearm and upper arm at our elbow and shoulder joints, as in the case of a big setup, and big follow-through. You can still use pronation while keeping your movement relatively compact.

    Also, when people say "extra weapon" it doesn't have to mean extra power, as in the case at the net. An attacking lift/push can be played with just relaxed wrist/fingers with literally no arm movement nor pronation/supernation.

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