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  1. #18
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum View Post
    Professionals look back before the shuttle gets near their partner. By the time their partner hits the shuttle, they are already looking forwards.
    Quote Originally Posted by pcll99 View Post
    I agree with what u said. But a lot of professional players do look back. Why?
    Yes, pros do glance back quickly, just to see if their partner will be in good position for an attacking shot or not. So that they will know where to stand and what shot and return to expect.

  2. #19
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    I recently suffered an eye injury which is still ongoing. I had been hit in the eye before which blurred my vision for around 10 minutes but this one did a number on me.

    My partner played a weak high drop shot, the opponent ran in and had time and with all his might killed it which hit my eye dead on the lens. My racquet was at my chest where I would expect the kill, the opponent not being a skilled player hit it at a bad contact point.

    For the first hour I could see nothing at all except light and dark. It was very scary at this time.
    Over the next few hours in A+E (Accident and Emergency) the vision raised to around 25-30%. I was told that I had internal bleeding in the lens.
    Over the next week the vision increased to around 40% with the blood gradually dissipating, I was told to stay on bed rest for 7-10 days to prevent what is called rebleed.
    The second week the vision raised to around 50% but it was still painful and blurred. I could just about read middle distance but long and short distance were a blur. The pressure buildup left me feeling constantly nauseous for the 2 weeks.
    Week three, vision increased to around 70% and then with a change of drops to 90%. I now have permanent pupil damage as my pupil is in shock and dilated, I will always have glare with any bright lights.
    Week four (this week) The pressure in the eye is not relieving itself as it should with medication. The shuttlecock damaged the angle (the part of the eye fluid leaves) and has damaged roughly 180 degrees of the 360 degree angle of the eye. I also have 95% vision but slight blurring at times. This blurring will likely be permanent as will a slight loss of vision. In the near future I may end up with cataracts. I currently am diagnosed with secondary glaucoma.

    I also have pain regularly and headaches as well as more nausea because of the changing pressure. If the medicine doesn't work may have to get surgery.

    I think back and wonder if only id blinked at that split millisecond. From now on I will be wearing goggles for all sports, one more hit and I may be permanently blind.

    I recommend to anyone reading this, wear eye protection, I was very lucky that by chance I got my vision back, you may not be so lucky. One hit has left me with permanent eye damage and it has been expensive for twice or thrice a week appointments at the hospital as well as a lot of money on medicine.

    Please wear eye protection, don't be one of the unlucky ones.

  3. #20
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^ Sorry to hear... fortunately your vision has recovered mostly. Hopefully this is not your dominant eye, and that a simple laser surgery can fix the glaucoma.

    Playing forecourt is dangerous in this regard, as there's less time to react after the shuttle crosses the tape. If the opponent is coming in for a net kill, don't bother trying to save the shot by seeing where it'll go... always turn your face, close your eyes, or raise your racket to protect your face.

  4. #21
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    @Avenger
    Hopefully you have fully recovered from your eye injury by now.

  5. #22
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    Reading this thread brings back an similar experience for a teen in our group. He looked back and got a nylon shuttle in the eye. Luckily it wasn't a hard return and he was fine after resting but I always tell doubles players to face forward when I catch them turning back. That eliminates one potential for accidents, they also know to turn away when they are close in the front and about to receive a smash or hard drive from the opposing front.

    Visor's opening post is dead on, great tips that I hope everyone follows AND reminds others in their group.

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    @Avenger
    Hopefully you have fully recovered from your eye injury by now.
    hi Visor, thanks
    it is good now, no more dizziness, no more afraid of very bright light (for example in a very bright building such as a mall)
    but the "flyer" in my eye is still there and will be there for the rest of my life. it is nothing big, I got accustomed to it now

  7. #24
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avenger View Post
    hi Visor, thanks
    it is good now, no more dizziness, no more afraid of very bright light (for example in a very bright building such as a mall)
    but the "flyer" in my eye is still there and will be there for the rest of my life. it is nothing big, I got accustomed to it now
    Good to hear. Yes, that "floater" is a small old blood clot inside the eye that will likely be there for a long time. With time, your brain will automatically block it out. But it'll be noticeable in very bright conditions.

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Good to hear. Yes, that "floater" is a small old blood clot inside the eye that will likely be there for a long time. With time, your brain will automatically block it out. But it'll be noticeable in very bright conditions.
    I am not sure if this is because of my eye injury or lasik, now if I tried to focus on things like playing video games or doing some job that needs a lot of focus, my injured eye started getting teary (and hot). the tears won't stop for few seconds which forced me to take a break

  9. #26
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Avenger View Post
    I am not sure if this is because of my eye injury or lasik, now if I tried to focus on things like playing video games or doing some job that needs a lot of focus, my injured eye started getting teary (and hot). the tears won't stop for few seconds which forced me to take a break
    Probably dry eye syndrome from post lasik. Use any of the over counter tear replacement eye drops, especially if you're concentrating hard with your eyes, you'll tend to blink less.

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Probably dry eye syndrome from post lasik. Use any of the over counter tear replacement eye drops, especially if you're concentrating hard with your eyes, you'll tend to blink less.
    true, and now I felt kinda dizzy in a very crowded place (can't focus), not only crowded with people, but also with burst of colours, light, and movement such as looking at a road with trees around it (so many leaf..). the worst part is that I barely can see my surrounding when I'm playing badminton, I can see the shuttlecock, the opponent, but not the background. I feel like this is a serious problem. I will go to my eye doctor when I come back to Indonesia (plus something is wrong with my knee.. patella tendonitis?). so many problems with my health this year..

  11. #28
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    It is really very true to say that eye injuries are more common in badminton players. My friend faced this problem about one year ago and now he is out of danger.

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