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  1. #154
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    So tell me about the text books which are used in Colleges and Universities today are they in SI or Imperials ? How about primary and secondary schools ?

  2. #155
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    The transition of text books were around 20 years ago, starting with the primary schools first. I'm pretty sure the text books were using SI exclusively for at least 10 years ago at all education level. At work, i use both IMP and SI with most conversion factors stuck in my head, length, area, volume, pressure, viscosity, temperature, mass/weight, and you name it. For temperature, F, C, Kelvin and Rankine.

  3. #156
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    Thumbs up

    Here in the U.K no we use mm, cm, Meters but we still use miles and hp. alo like grams and kilograms

  4. #157
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    It is neither an economical nor an elegant way to get more power by adding a turbo or super-charger on a car with a naturally aspirated engine. You would be better off getting a turbo car in the first place, instead of a turbo add-on on your Honda Civic. I am a purist and I believe the NA and Turbo cars should not be 'mixed and matched' to get a modified hybrid.
    There are some very small capacity Japanese turbo cars that will pump out more than 150bhp easily. For NA cars, you might want to consider the Clio 180 or the Peugeot 180, which put out 180bhp, despite their small size (very much smaller than the Honda Civic).

  5. #158
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    Originally posted by Chia
    Not sure..
    its either nissan or toyota
    pathfinder? or possibly the titan or the frontier.. or the toyota tacoma?
    Oops, i had changed my mind.
    Good guess though, those were pics of titan and armada chassis

  6. #159
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    Originally posted by taneepak
    It is neither an economical nor an elegant way to get more power by adding a turbo or super-charger on a car with a naturally aspirated engine. You would be better off getting a turbo car in the first place, instead of a turbo add-on on your Honda Civic. I am a purist and I believe the NA and Turbo cars should not be 'mixed and matched' to get a modified hybrid.
    There are some very small capacity Japanese turbo cars that will pump out more than 150bhp easily. For NA cars, you might want to consider the Clio 180 or the Peugeot 180, which put out 180bhp, despite their small size (very much smaller than the Honda Civic).
    ya, i agree, that's why i sounded negative initially about aftermarket turbo add on.

  7. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    peter lsd, if you want cost effective flat torque curve, stuff a v6 in it.
    Try and true auto/bike makers toyota, honda, ferrari, M. Benz, yamaha, kawasaki, suzuki, bmw, etc don't use turbo in their sport cars/bikes. Some sport bikes can rev over 10,000 rpm and turbocharging is still not used.

    There is no replacement for displacement.
    Mercedes Benz is coming around to its senses


    2005 MERCEDES-BENZ C55 AMG
    ON SALE: July
    BASE PRICE: $52,000 (est.)
    POWERTRAIN: 5.5-liter, 362-hp, 376-lb-ft V8; rwd, five-speed automatic
    CURB WEIGHT: 3605 pounds
    0 TO 60 MPH: 5.2 seconds (mfr.)

    A FEW YEARS BACK, WE THOUGHT A supercharged 3.2-liter, V6-powered Mercedes-Benz C32 AMG was the best thing short of a BMW M3.

    Mercedes engineers even argued their midsize rocket was the better of the two, considering it provided a more hospitable environment for everyday driving. And for driving that ventured beyond everyday, the C32 offered nearly the same torque as the V8-powered S-Class, in a much lighter-weight, sportier package.

    So why mess with success? Why bother with a V8? Because in the performance arena, those who remain the same get left in the dust. In that spirit, in late July Mercedes will introduce the C55 AMG, powered by a 362-hp, 376-lb-ft 5.5-liter V8. Gone is the need to supercharge, along with any associated lack of refinement and belt-driven accessory whine. In the course of adding the bigger engine, the C55 AMG picks up just 65 pounds (making a 3605-pound total) vs. the 2004 C32 AMG, balanced against a 13-hp improvement in power and a 44-lb-ft increase in torque to 376 at 4000 rpm. Toss in Mercedes’ five-speed automatic gearbox with steering wheel-mounted shift buttons (yes!), AMG exterior trim, 18-inch wheels, AMG-specific leather seats and four-gauge instrument cluster, and the whole package almost screams “screamer.”
    Last edited by cooler; 04-28-2004 at 04:14 PM.

  8. #161
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    Default Back to Basic (smooth displacement)

    (07:30 April 26, 2004)
    M stands for Monster: New M5 promises to be BMW's hottest production sedan ever

    By GREG KABLE

    2006 BMW M5
    ON SALE: 2005
    BASE PRICE: $80,000 (est.)
    POWERTRAIN: 5.0-liter, 500-hp, 369-lb-ft V10; rwd, seven-speed manual
    CURB WEIGHT: 3900 pounds (est.)
    0 to 60 MPH: 4.7 seconds (est.)

    Rather than resort to forced induction like rivals (2004 ) AMG and Audi Sport do with the E55 and RS6, respectively, BMW engineers rely on a heavy dose of revs to achieve the 25 percent increase in power. If rumors circulating at the M5's unveiling at Geneva in March hold true, the new engine will rev close to 8500 rpm in production trim.

  9. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    Mercedes Benz is coming around to its senses


    2005 MERCEDES-BENZ C55 AMG
    ON SALE: July
    BASE PRICE: $52,000 (est.)
    POWERTRAIN: 5.5-liter, 362-hp, 376-lb-ft V8; rwd, five-speed automatic
    CURB WEIGHT: 3605 pounds
    0 TO 60 MPH: 5.2 seconds (mfr.)

    Gone is the need to supercharge, along with any associated lack of refinement and belt-driven accessory whine.
    They have of course conveniently decided to ignore the fact that in MB's bigger, more luxurious range where noise is a much greater factor that they are still supercharged

    E55 AMG
    5.5L 24-valve V-8 engine
    469 hp @ 6,100 rpm
    516 lb-ft @ 2,650 - 4,500 rpm
    0-60 mph in 4.5 seconds
    MSRP: $79,270.00*

    S55 AMG
    AMG-built intercooled supercharged SOHC 5.5L 24-valve V-8 engine
    493 hp @ 6,100 rpm
    516 lb-ft @ 2,750 - 4,000 rpm
    0-60 mph in 4.6 seconds
    MSRP: $110,970.00*
    Last edited by Pecheur; 04-28-2004 at 04:39 PM.

  10. #163
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    Default Coming back to the Good Old 350 c.i. engine

    2004 PONTIAC GTO
    DATE IN FLEET: March 24-April 5, 2004
    AS-TESTED PRICE: $32,795
    POWERTRAIN: 5.7-liter V8; rwd, four-speed automatic
    OUTPUT: 350 hp @ 5200 rpm, 365 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm
    CURB WEIGHT: 3725 pounds
    MPG (EPA COMBINED/AW OBSERVED): 17.9/17.3

    ----------------
    Notice that the above cars are RWD

  11. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pecheur
    They have of course conveniently decided to ignore the fact that in MB's bigger, more luxurious range where noise is a much greater factor that they are still supercharged :P

    S55 AMG
    MSRP $110,970.00*
    Engine AMG-built intercooled supercharged SOHC 5.5L 24-valve V-8 engine
    Net Power 493 hp @ 6,100 rpm
    Net Torque 516 lb-ft @ 2,750 - 4,000 rpm
    They're working on it
    Profit driven company tends to upgrade popular models first
    Besides, 5.5L in the S55 is quite big already.
    My point is that they rather revert back to a V8 in their 'smaller' M. Benz
    Last edited by cooler; 04-28-2004 at 04:45 PM.

  12. #165
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    Don't get me wrong Pecheur, i'm not against forced induction. If you give me a S55 AMG, i'll gladly take it, with open arms

  13. #166
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    Thumbs up Diesel Fan

    Tech Tidbits — July 2004
    A vote for diesels.

    By Dennis Simanaitis, Engineering Editor
    July 2004



    New Technology Promises Even Better Torque

    Diesel efficiency has attracted lots of automakers — and almost half of European new-car buyers. High-pressure common-rail direct injection is all the rage. (See last month's First Drive of the high-performance Mercedes-Benz E320 CDI; see also "Technology Update: The Diesel," May 2003.)

    What's more, there is new technology that promises to enhance a diesel's strong point, namely its abundant torque. Our European Editor Paul Frère learned details at this year's Geneva show. His report follows:

    Reasonably frigid conditions — well, it was in the low 20s — necessitated only a slight pre-heat pause between key twist and compression-ignition, somewhat less than a couple of seconds. During warmup, the sounds of the inline-6's combustion were diesel-like, but not to excess, especially within the 5 Series' cabin. Once underway, up to temperature and cruising around, the 530d was difficult to distinguish from its gasoline-burning sibling.

    Its prodigious torque, 369 lb.-ft. at a mere 2000 rpm, was one giveaway, oft employed in being the first across just about any intersection. Another was the car's parsimonious use of fuel.

    I enjoyed a total of 364 miles in my 530d, much of this mixing it up with suburban Detroit traffic. I must say, I didn't see as many diesel stations as I encounter here at home. And the one I ultimately visited wasn't all that spiffy; its diesel pump looking a bit grimy (from disuse?). In any case, 12.7 gal. filled the tank, which worked out to 28.7 mpg. To put this in perspective, our recent seven-car comparison included a gasoline BMW 530i that got 21.1 mpg.

    Even with diesel priced comparably to gasoline, in Detroit as it is around here, there are significant savings to be had. What's more, I'm looking forward to driving that 2-stage-turbodiesel BMW described by Paul Frère earlier in this column. The same 3.0 liters — and 413 lb.-ft. of torque? Where do I sign?

    See last month's Tech Tidbits.

    Both BMW and Opel have exhibited 2-stage turbocharged diesel engines, a 3.0-liter inline-6 from BMW, a 2.0-liter inline-4 from Opel. Although the Opel is still a prototype, the BMW has already powered a special X5 finishing 3rd overall in this year's Dakar Rally.

    With both, the aim is to get high torque as soon as possible, reducing turbo lag to an absolute minimum. In overview, each uses a small turbocharger generating boost at low crankshaft speed and a larger one taking over as engine revs rise.

    At low rpm, a closed flap valve directs all exhaust gases to the small turbo's turbine, thus quickly generating useful boost on demand. From the small turbo, these exhaust gases are fed to the turbine of the large turbo, where their residual energy prepares the latter for its boost regime.

    As engine rpm increases, and the small turbo becomes saturated, the flap valve gradually opens — thus routing increasingly more exhaust directly to the large turbo. This turbo pressurizes the intake air before it reaches the small turbo, thus enhancing the latter's effect.

    As engine speed approaches 3000 rpm, the flap opens completely, giving the large turbo full benefit of the exhaust gases. Simultaneously, a check valve in the intake system opens to allow a bypass of the small turbo (which continues to spin up as exhaust backpressure increases). An important feature is a perfectly smooth transition from small- to large-turbo operation.

    BMW sets a maximum boost of 2.85 bar absolute (26.6 psi gauge). Its 3.0-liter engine produces 268 bhp (thus, almost 90 bhp/liter, quite an achievement for a diesel) with maximum torque of 413 lb.-ft.

    Opel's, though not yet a production engine, runs at even higher boost, 3.2 bar absolute (31.7 psi gauge). It produces 209 bhp from its 2.0 liters (thus, more than the magic 100 bhp/liter) and 295 lb.-ft. of torque.

    Both powerplants meet next year's Euro 4 emissions regulations as well.

  14. #167
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    Compared to gasoline, disel is certainly the more efficient fuel. However, unless Americans can get rid of their grandfather's negative impressions about disel technology, and more importantly, improve the cleanliness of America's extremely dirty disel fuels (compared to Europe, at least), disel is not going to catch on in North America.

    -Rick

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    if u want clean torque? put a electric motor in it.
    i believe hybrids will out sell turbo diesels by a lot.

  16. #169
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    what's the torque curve for a hybrid look like? is it flat?

  17. #170
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    Default Prius

    flatter than F.R. of highend loudspeakers
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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