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  1. #171
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    wow. almost flat, that's close to ideal!

    is that for an electric car or for a hybrid? i am surprised there is little sign of the transition from electric to gas.

  2. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    wow. almost flat, that's close to ideal!

    is that for an electric car or for a hybrid? i am surprised there is little sign of the transition from electric to gas.
    - prius is a hybrid.
    - the smooth transition credit goes to toyota's engineering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    wow. almost flat, that's close to ideal!

    is that for an electric car or for a hybrid? i am surprised there is little sign of the transition from electric to gas.
    That's for a hybrid, actually the Prius has more torque than the turbo charged 2.0 lt Subaru WRX It's got so much torque low down it needs traction control. Of course a WRX would still smoke it off the line, and anywhere else actually, but it's still an amusing stat.

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    Electric motor produces maximum torque at 0 rpm . The best combo is diesel-electric.

  5. #175
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    Thumbs up

    all i can say is 2.0L HDi 136 lol

  6. #176
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    Default No modification needed here (shown are 10 and 12 cylinders)

    It's more efficient than a hybrid car

    The Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is the most powerful and most efficient prime-mover in the world today. The Aioi Works of Japan's Diesel United, Ltd built the first engines and is where some of these pictures were taken.
    It is available in 6 through 14 cylinder versions, all are inline engines. These engines were designed primarily for very large container ships. Ship owners like a single engine/single propeller design and the new generation of larger container ships needed a bigger engine to propel them.

    The cylinder bore is just under 38" and the stroke is just over 98". Each cylinder displaces 111,143 cubic inches (1820 liters) and produces 7780 horsepower. Total displacement comes out to 1,556,002 cubic inches (25,480 liters) for the fourteen cylinder version.

    Some facts on the 14 cylinder version:
    Total engine weight: 2300 tons (The crankshaft alone weighs 300 tons.)
    Length: 89 feet
    Height: 44 feet
    Maximum power: 108,920 hp at 102 rpm
    Maximum torque: 5,608,312 lb/ft at 102rpm

    Fuel consumption at maximum power is 0.278 lbs per hp per hour (Brake Specific Fuel Consumption). Fuel consumption at maximum economy is 0.260 lbs/hp/hour. At maximum economy the engine exceeds 50% thermal efficiency. That is, more than 50% of the energy in the fuel in converted to motion.
    For comparison, most automotive and small aircraft engines have BSFC figures in the 0.40-0.60 lbs/hp/hr range and 25-30% thermal efficiency range.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Last edited by cooler; 06-29-2004 at 03:47 PM.

  7. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    It's more efficient than a hybrid car

    The Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is the most powerful and most efficient prime-mover in the world today.

    At maximum economy the engine exceeds 50% thermal efficiency. That is, more than 50% of the energy in the fuel in converted to motion.
    For comparison, most automotive and small aircraft engines have BSFC figures in the 0.40-0.60 lbs/hp/hr range and 25-30% thermal efficiency range.
    Yeah but big turbo charged two strokes are always going to be really efficient due to scavenging effects. If they tried that on a sub 10 lt cylinder would show rather different results.

  8. #178
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    lol
    That's too many ponies in there!! (Also too big)

  9. #179
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    I wonder how much thermal and mechancial efficiency one would get out of an IC engine if carbon-carbon or carbon-graphite-ceramic pistons were used? The usual high-strength pistons are made of forged steel and aluminum.

    50% thermal efficiency is very high. Does it incorporate some sort of heat recuperator to extract the last drop of usable heat energy (besides turbos)? A high-bypass turbofan engine has about the same thermal efficiency.
    Last edited by Pete LSD; 06-29-2004 at 07:57 PM.

  10. #180
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    A ceramic engine on diesel mode has very high thermal efficiency.
    Don't know why it's still not main stream as ceramic engines have been around for decades. (no need of oil, no cooling, dont corrode, etc)

  11. #181
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooler
    A ceramic engine on diesel mode has very high thermal efficiency.
    Don't know why it's still not main stream as ceramic engines have been around for decades. (no need of oil, no cooling, dont corrode, etc)
    I thought ceramic engines are expensive?

  12. #182
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    yes but relative to the total cost of a vehicle it isnt that much.
    no more expensive than equivalent hybrid vehicle

  13. #183
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    Yes, ceramic engines are expensive to make and they crack easily. Ceramic engine is viably only if technology from the F-22 were to filter down to the lowly automobile industry. If I recall correctly, the F-22 has turbine blade that is ceramic in the outer layer and titanium compound matrix in the structural core. The idea is similar to Yonex's Armortec system.

  14. #184
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    however, we dont need nasa grade ceramic for automotive use tho.
    also, there are more cars than jet planes so the cost would come down due to mass production.

  15. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete LSD
    Has any car fanatic added a low-pressure turbo charger and intercooler to his/her car while retaining the original compression ratio?

    Take the 2004 Civic sedan DX & LX models with a 1.7 Liter sohc 4 banger, as examples. The stock engine comes with a 9.50:1.00 compression ratio. Let's say I want to retain the original compression ratio and add a low-pressure turbo charger to it. Which type of turbo system should I look for when outrageous horsepower is not a requirement. Here is my requirement:

    (1) Very high Peak torque at or above 150 lb ft
    (2) extremely broad torque curve
    (3) minimum turbo lag
    (4) max horsepower at 150 or less
    Pete,spending all that money for a low P turbo system isnt cost effective. I may come across sounding like anti turbo but not really. Turbos in the 70's and 80's were poor but had improved alot since then mainly from better materials (ceramic) and electronic (computer). I see lot of innovation in turbo and technology been filtering down to do-it-yourselfers now. Have u heard a remotely located TC system?

  16. #186
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluejeff
    I thought ceramic engines are expensive?
    that's because there is more profit from making war equips.


    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/bc?s=CEP....=on&z=m&q=l&c=

  17. #187
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete LSD
    Humm, . . . I have many auto mechanics friends who will bet their life on this issue: if GM or any of the U.S. automakers would give them, free, cars to drive, they would never accept the offer. To them GM = Garbage Motor.
    I wouldn't go that far. Your mechanics probably only know small cars(aka ricers ) GM does make good stuff if ur willing to pay for it. For example.

    http://www.gmpartsdirect.com/results...umber=12498827

    not bad consider it is made to be abused. 720 hp, naturally aspirated, non fuel injected

    I wonder how much a racing engine with similar HP made by toyota and honda would cost. Found one site.

    http://www.doaracingengines.com/v6.html
    Last edited by cooler; 07-09-2004 at 02:09 AM.

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