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Thread: Training racket

  1. #1
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    Default Training racket

    I've recently visited Japan and found some badminton rackets designed specially for training.

    These rackets are very heavy, pretty much the same as a squash racket (may be more heavy in compare with those new generation super-light weight squash rackets). However, you can actually use it for training and even for games because it is no doubt a badminton racket.

    I just send mine for string and would try it in coming week. Will post more information about how it performs later.

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    haha, i still have those 70s rackets with rusty steel shafts and big wooden heads that weighs like 2-3 current rackets. I guess dat counts as a "Training racket" too.

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    Dont these training racquets injure your arm?

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    Hi Ricky,

    May we know the brand name, model, and price of this training racket ?

    Tks.

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    This is where I get the racket and the details of the racket :

    http://www.rs-cabin.co.jp/shop_html/...=komono&page=1

    I've played with it once and I think it is a quite a effective tool for training, especially for shots which you need to use your figure and wrist to generate the power (but not the arm).

    As you can see from the photos, the racket weights about 150-160g, which is almost double of a 3U racket. While it is heavy, its shaft is relatively flexible. It is regular length racket with isometric head shape.

    Since I was not in good condition last night, I've used the racket for my entire training session. I do think someone should use it cautiously to avoid gettting hurt.

    p.s. Fyi, my coach said it is good for training as well.

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    Do youtrain with the Racquet cover on?

    Looks like it's been designed specifically for that.

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    Dear Ricky,

    Many thanks for your information.

    I think playing with this heavy racket is somewhere like playing with a squash racket.

    Then what string and stringing tension do you apply on this heavy racket ? After practising with this racket all the night, do you feel tired ? Particularly your fore arm ?

    Tks.

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    It is better than a squash racket because it is a badminton racket. In fact, one of my elder brother had played a game with that training racket - it is something difficult for a squash racket.

    I've strung the racket with BG68Ti (the string I normally use) at 22 lbs. I go for lower tension because I worried that it would be quite difficult to play with if I use too high string tension.

    Actually, I can't play with the racket for whole night, my forearm and wrist felt very tired after playing with the racket for 15 minutes.

    I didn't play with the cover on - but it can be another kind of training. In fact, my coach instructed me to do similar thing with normal racket.

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    Hi Ricky,

    Thank you once more for sharing your experience with us.

    Hope your skill and power will further advance by practising with this extra-ordinary racket.

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    I think It would be pretty hard to train with a cover on, even that one, I swung a normal raquet with the cover on once and it flew right off

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    My coach has a tennis racquet in his bag...I asked him why and he says it strengthens your wrist, arm etc. I'm sure it would as playing with a tennis racquet would be almost impossible...havnt tried tho...

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    Originally posted by sharkboy
    I think It would be pretty hard to train with a cover on, even that one, I swung a normal raquet with the cover on once and it flew right off
    It is possible (and effective) for some shots but not all, e.g. shots which do not require too much (or no) arm movement.

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    Yes it is difficult, but this is specailised traing - racquet covers, squash racquets and
    heavier racquets.

    This type of training is done in a few ways -

    1. Speed and too a lesser degree strength, before a match. This involves stroke
    production with out shuttles. Clears, smashes, flick lifts etc

    2. Training sessions over weeks to develop strength, without shuttles - shadow work

    3. Feeding Net and driving work with shuttles.

    Regards

    Stuart

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    The cover that you see is to make you hit your shots in the sweet spot of the racket, that is why it looks like it has a hole in it where the mesh fits in. The use for the mesh is to make you hit your shots that little bit harder because it acts like a muffler, it takes energy from the swing.

    Carlton also produced a racket head cover like this but called it a speed trainer, you can see it on their website.

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    Originally posted by Dill
    The cover that you see is to make you hit your shots in the sweet spot of the racket, that is why it looks like it has a hole in it where the mesh fits in. The use for the mesh is to make you hit your shots that little bit harder because it acts like a muffler, it takes energy from the swing.

    Carlton also produced a racket head cover like this but called it a speed trainer, you can see it on their website.
    Hmm, but the extra wind resistance of the cover would totally disrupt your swing timing wouldn't it?

    i just thought that the cover would provide the extra wind resistance to build up arm strength & the hole would provide stability to the swing
    kinda like a parachute has a hole in the middle to stop the air spilling out of the sides.

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    How are yasaki, kamachi rackets??

    If tennis racket can do, I think the low end steel racket also can do.

    Just depended on which part you need to train up.

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    Hmm, but the extra wind resistance of the cover would totally disrupt your swing timing wouldn't it?
    Not if you used the correct pronation, remember in the old days you should keep your racket head side on to the opposition for as long as possible and then pronate the forearm to give you the power for the shot.

    Not so nowdays where a more flat face or open face of the racket is presented.

    In theory it gives resistance to make you swing the racket head faster and you are supposed to hit the shuttle in the hole section so you time all your shots perfectly.

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