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    Default What is the name of this technique? ( in playing single)

    Hi all,

    I often see players use this technique very frequently when playing singles. I think that it is a technique that those who play singles must know but I could not find it in any badminton technique book or training video clip.

    Here is some description of this technique:

    The player ( right handed) stands at the center of the court and his opponent hits the shuttle high and fast to the right back-court corner. Because the shuttle moves too fast that the player cannot move there and use a forehand overhead clear. And now he will have to use the technique. The interesting is that from this technique he can have some variations which make the opponent more difficult to predict:

    Please see this technique in the following youtube clip:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAZ0m6e_HLs

    It can be just drop shots ( like the Yellow player did in the clip from 2:30 - 2:34s )

    Or it can be a strong and high clear to the opponent's back court (Yellow player in the clip at 2:38)

    Or a fast hit straight to the opponent's body (Yellow player at 3:58)

    Could you please tell me what is the name of this technique so that I can have a keyword to google.

    and if possible, any link or video clips which teach it?

    Or if not, please educate a little how I can do this.

    Thank you


    Thank you

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    Forearm pronation.

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    Thanks visor. I search around with this keyword but all I can found is pronation overhead clear/smash/backhand like this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNVC5PVJyPQ

    They are not what I am looking for. Or probably the one I am looking for is only one of many variations of a wide meaning term " Forearm pronation". What I want to learn is specifically: "the player moves to right corner and hits the shuttle which is as high as his head". It is the same as what we see in the clip I posted in my earlier post. I believe this should be a very popular technique and quite difficult for playing singles. I am curious why there is no discussion/ tutorial about this technique in the Internet.

    If you know any book/ link discussing this in more detail, please let me know.

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    hmm.. i do that quite often because of lazy feet.. :P

    no idea what its called though.

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    I've never actually known a specific name for this type of shot because it's not quite an overhead, but most of the time it's around head or shoulder height. Either way it applies the same principles of forearm pronation in an overhead and applies it while the shuttle is to the side of you. You can have a lot of variation on the shot if you have the speed to get there in time.

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    Thanks for your replies, buddies. I guess it is a quite difficult technique based on looking at how the guy in the clip moved and placed his right leg to hit the shuttles, how his body turned before he hit the shuttle.

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    its not really a technique... more like a desperate shot when pushed out of position.

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    Hi Visor. Looking at any clips of badminton singles, you can see players use it very frequently and their bodies their movements are almost identical. I believe they should learn how to hit it during their trainings. If so I would call it a technique.

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    don't know what you mean? these are just normal shots with the player being a bit too late to get behind the shuttle. pretty standard shot for intermediate play (and better)....

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    the first one where the player in yellow plays flat is called a neutralising shot as he is neutralising the threat of his opponent. he doesn't want to concede the lift so he plays it down, he plays it with pace to give his opponent less angles on him or the chance to spin the shuttle putting him under even more pressure.

    however if he over does this his opponent may step up the court to intercept this to play a tight and very early block so he must use the occassional clear (with sharp technique) to force his opponent back again so as to make his original neutralising shot more effective again.

    not only can u vary the height and length but also the width of shot and the pace too if you so wish (and have the control). beware that if u try to play the flat shot too hard u will run the risk of error and also give u less time to recover. somewhere in between is good so long as it doesn't float. key is recovery to give the impression to ur opponent the court is smaller and as you haven't given them an obvious winner maybe force into trying to finish the rally and cause a mistake.

    some older style players (and new) leave the shuttle to fall into this area then hit hard and come forward. thomas stuer lauridsen used to use this to great effect but it did help that he was so tall.

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    Quote Originally Posted by |_Footwork_| View Post
    don't know what you mean? these are just normal shots with the player being a bit too late to get behind the shuttle. pretty standard shot for intermediate play (and better)....
    Agreed. I use this all the time and its a shot that comes naturally. Sometimes I will turn the wrist inwards to give a cross court drop.

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    Thanks guys but I still don't think it can be easily played naturally. As ones mentioned, to hit it we should prone our forearm. If so how our body turns and our legs are placed would be very important to have a safe strong hit to the opponent's back-court. If we placed these things wrong we may break our elbows and shoulders.

    I see many armatures playing singles and none of them (except those with some professional training courses ) can comfortably hit the shuttle strongly to backcourt using the " technique" I am asking about (like the player in yellow in the clip). But of course some without training can learn it by themselves.


    If you can do it, can you please give me some instruction like

    + how many degrees our body should turn before we hit the shuttle,

    + when your racket contact the shuttle, where should be the shuttle: as high as your head, eyes? a little in front of you? or a little behind?

    + do you lock your elbow when you move your arm to hit?

    + from where you generate the power?

    these are what I am very curious about.

    Thank you.


    Quote Originally Posted by rogerv2 View Post
    Agreed. I use this all the time and its a shot that comes naturally. Sometimes I will turn the wrist inwards to give a cross court drop.

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    Thanks Ben. It is nice to learn these tactics. However for now I am more interested in how to do it than when I should do it.

    Can you describe in details how we can do it?

    Thanks
    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Beckman View Post
    the first one where the player in yellow plays flat is called a neutralising shot as he is neutralising the threat of his opponent. he doesn't want to concede the lift so he plays it down, he plays it with pace to give his opponent less angles on him or the chance to spin the shuttle putting him under even more pressure.

    however if he over does this his opponent may step up the court to intercept this to play a tight and very early block so he must use the occassional clear (with sharp technique) to force his opponent back again so as to make his original neutralising shot more effective again.

    not only can u vary the height and length but also the width of shot and the pace too if you so wish (and have the control). beware that if u try to play the flat shot too hard u will run the risk of error and also give u less time to recover. somewhere in between is good so long as it doesn't float. key is recovery to give the impression to ur opponent the court is smaller and as you haven't given them an obvious winner maybe force into trying to finish the rally and cause a mistake.

    some older style players (and new) leave the shuttle to fall into this area then hit hard and come forward. thomas stuer lauridsen used to use this to great effect but it did help that he was so tall.

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    Hi Rudky, these are shots that come naturally, that is what the rest is trying to say. if you play long enough you would hv encounter such situations. You can ask your training partner to push you to the 2 back corners to train for this, but first pls get your basics right and that includes correct grip, footwork, pronation, etc etc which you can find at Techniques threads.

    I don't train for such shots, if I hv the time I will do a cross court drive/drop, if I hv less time I do a straight drop....If I hv power that day I do a power drive down the line....if I have no time, I just whack the ball very hard to lob it to opponent baseline.

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    If you notice the most times that he ends up hitting the shot (TMNguyen) is when he's hitting an attacking shot with power and pushes forwards, perhaps too eagerly, but also it's part of his playstyle because he moves so quick that he knows he can't get completely caught out.

    You most definitely can train this shot, it all depends on the skill of your training partner / coach however. The most important thing is when training that the shot has to be a low push to the rear court with pace, enough that even at 100% you are struggling to get to it.

    It is a quite good shot to train, the way you do it (for forehand) is:

    Soft pushes on to each other on your backhand at the forecourt, then at random your partner decides to put a fast paced push to the forehand rearcourt and you must move quickly and under pressure to retrieve it. You can either practise hitting back to him, or hitting with multi feed.


    The reason for doing pushes on the forecourt backhand is that it's the longest distance to the shot you want to practise, and if your hitting partner can hit deceptively and with enough pace cross court then it definitely will put you under pressure and function as a good training regime.
    Last edited by AimUk; 12-03-2012 at 12:21 PM.

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    How to do it? Get to it as soon as you can and hit it as early as you can preferably while still above tape level. Supinate to windup, then pronate and whip into the bird hard and crisply for power or tap for drop.

    If you want to give this shot a name, it'll be a late forehand shot.
    Last edited by visor; 12-03-2012 at 12:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rudky View Post
    Thanks Ben. It is nice to learn these tactics. However for now I am more interested in how to do it than when I should do it.

    Can you describe in details how we can do it?

    Thanks
    Make sure your racket foot is 'a lot' behind the shuttle. Make sure foot is pointing directly away from body. Try to make contact when bird is level with your body. (Copy the vids... )

    It is used so predominantly in singles because you can play a variety of shots and maintain a relatively central position when compared to the more conventional technique of getting behind the shuttle.
    Last edited by amleto; 12-03-2012 at 12:34 PM.

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