User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 18 to 25 of 25
  1. #18
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tigerlam92 View Post
    Looking up.
    There is a post here with a diagram to explain it really well. For me, looking up will allow you to see the shuttle sooner and to see the trajectory easier, then allow you to react and defend better. This is because your area of vision shifted higher so the shuttle enter your visible zone earlier.
    I'm trying to imagine visually, what the difference would be if I were to stand up straight when receiving a smash as opposed to staying low... I suppose, if the smash was not very steep, then its harder to see the trajectory standing up?

    Would you mind posting a link to that post with the diagram? Thanks

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    us
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The video is great thanks! I do like this coach a lot, just wish the audio qualities on his videos were better, or at least have english subtitle.

    Can you link me to this diagram that you're talking about?


    Quote Originally Posted by tigerlam92 View Post
    Badminton: Smash Defense http://youtu.be/9Fw1Wn_DsMs
    Please see video. It explains a lot and demonstrates the techniques and tips.

    Looking up.
    There is a post here with a diagram to explain it really well. For me, looking up will allow you to see the shuttle sooner and to see the trajectory easier, then allow you to react and defend better. This is because your area of vision shifted higher so the shuttle enter your visible zone earlier.

    More importantly for me is getting lower which forces you to get into the ready position and be ready to react faster. Also, lower means the shuttle has a little more to travel so it gives you a little more time to react. Secondly, it would be helpful to take one step back from center of court. This also allow you to have a little more time to react. Combining the one step back and getting lower while receiving the smash in-front and away from your body, you will mainly have to focus on lower defends only. That is because at this position, anything coming over your shoulder will likely go out. The only disadvantage is that if your opponent is really good and see this, they will do a half smash (cut smash) where it is really short.

    The link to the video is really good and explain this. Again, like other said, this is mainly related to doubles.

    I did played a lot of tennis and was part of USTA as well. If I was returning serves against Ivanisevic or Roddick first serve, I will guess and take a chance. If not, there is no way I will get there in time to return especially with his placement, spin, or speed. In badminton, for doubles, it is definitely not quite the same. Anticipation is still there but not as important. I think the tennis analogy will be very close to badminton for singles though. I remember one commentator said about Lin Dan, that we all know how great he is, but something we can't see when watching him on the sideline or on the video but he definitely see that when playing against him is that it is extremely hard to tell where he is hitting or smashing.

    Cheers
    Hugh

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    England
    Posts
    831
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    I'm trying to imagine visually, what the difference would be if I were to stand up straight when receiving a smash as opposed to staying low... I suppose, if the smash was not very steep, then its harder to see the trajectory standing up?
    To pick up on this point:
    95% of the processing power done by your brain is focused within 5 degrees of the center of your vision. That means that for something very close to the centre of your vision, you will have many more times the "processing power" from your brain. This means you will register what is happening more easily, e.g. the direction of the shuttle, the trajectory etc, if you can keep the shuttles in the centre (or near the centre) for longer. We want to avoid using the peripheral vision, and anything too far off centre.

    If you crouch lower, and the shuttle is struck downwards (a smash), then the shuttle should feel like its coming "towards" you, as it should stay in your central field of vision as it comes down "at" you. If you were stood upright, looking at the shuttle, and the shuttle was struck downwards, the shuttle will quickly dip below your line of vision, resulting in you have to move your eyes/head to keep up with the shuttle. Thus, when standing, when your opponent strikes the shuttle, you are more likely to lose the shuttle into your peripheral vision, and then have to try and "find it" again so that you can then keep more careful track of its progress. This is because the shuttle will slip "below" your line of vision if you were stood upright.

    If your crouch however, there is less chance that the shuttle will drop below your line of sight (as you are looking upwards at it). As it comes downwards towards you, you will be using more of your brain to process the shuttle, allowing you to respond more quickly.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,231
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Excellent, thanks for the explanation!

  5. #22
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,361
    Mentioned
    102 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Good points from Matt and Hugh about low crouching position. Allows easier and faster retrieval of steep smashes... with direct central vision and taking the shuttle early in front of the body with extended arm. And any smash that's too high would likely be out . I'll have to remember these important points.

  6. #23
    New Member b.kristyono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    denpasar bali
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    This is what i do usually : put the racquet in front of body, normal grip, relaxed arm, one of my foot slightly in front of the other one, lower my body, also telling my self to keep calm

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    176
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I will look at the shuttle. I have been cheated so many times...

    I may take a quick glance so that I can adjust my position and racket in anticipation of certain shots, but that's about it.

    Go lower, square stance or racket foot slightly in front and prepare racket, usually tilt towards forehand side.

  8. #25
    New Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    When someone hits a smash at me, all I do is look at the bird, and my body does the rest. It feels natural for me. But remember that you can look at open spaces before you hit it. Perhaps a drop shot after a smash for a better chance at attac mode.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •