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  1. #18
    Regular Member alex292's Avatar
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    @footwork:
    1) My position while receiving service is also caused by my bad backwards-movement. When I am standing on the service-line almost every opponent just uses flick-services and my error-rate is very high on retrieving them. I'll try to move forward a little bit in the future.
    2) Not the best desicion, I agree
    3) Yeah, it feels quite embarrassing to watch the video of me falling and stumbling around court.

    Our team only has one squad and we are playing in "C-Klasse Frankfurt", but that is pretty boring. In the tournament we played "B-Klasse" and we also played severall tournaments in "A-Klasse" or "B-Klasse" last year.
    For next season I plan to change to a new club, that plays "A-Klasse Darmstadt".

  2. #19
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alex292 View Post
    @footwork:
    1) My position while receiving service is also caused by my bad backwards-movement. When I am standing on the service-line almost every opponent just uses flick-services and my error-rate is very high on retrieving them. I'll try to move forward a little bit in the future.
    2) Not the best desicion, I agree
    3) Yeah, it feels quite embarrassing to watch the video of me falling and stumbling around court.

    Our team only has one squad and we are playing in "C-Klasse Frankfurt", but that is pretty boring. In the tournament we played "B-Klasse" and we also played severall tournaments in "A-Klasse" or "B-Klasse" last year.
    For next season I plan to change to a new club, that plays "A-Klasse Darmstadt".
    don't be embarass, it's a learning process, it's good you have the courage to ask and the willingness to listen

  3. #20
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    Hmm.... Still really raw... a lot of things you still can work on.. But its good that you dare to upload your videos online to learn! Love that attitude of yours! If only my students was like that

    Well apart from coordination, balance and some minor problems (racket is down half the time) One thing you MUST have in order to bring your game to the next level. It's that kind of strategic follow ups, or like anticipating the shots.

    Too often i see that after you hit the shots you tend to be blur and not know where to go and what to expect, causing you to appear slow, easy to be caught off-guard etc...

    Well in order to build this kind of anticipating abilities, firstly of course you need to think while playing, and not just 'i want to lift over my opponent' and that's it.

    You need to be familiar with all the different strokes and their uses. I know this sounds like very basic but in your game apparently there is not a lot of variations ( e.g no slice drop shots, no cross nets, half smashes)


    In my site(no promotion intended) i actually wrote about the different variations of strokes and also their purpose and disadvantages. http://www.art-of-badminton.com

    After you're clear with all your options, you need to start to anticipate what is next, the simplest example i can think of is playing against a small child, when you pin them at the baseline, you can actually stand closer to the net because you anticipate that the child would most probably do a drop shot because he doesn't have the power to lob back to base.

    So with more practice and experience, you'll eventually build up on your anticipation 'feel', and your strategic game as you would be able to link your moves together, for example after a full smash at half court you dash forward for the net kill, hence bringing you to a whole new level of threat and efficiency in badminton! Good luck!

  4. #21
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    @alex,
    You often get of balance while doing a stroke, and your stroke are often larger than necessary. Try to learn and use more compact strokes (using wrist, finger power, forearm rotation etc..). So you have a lower tendency to make mistakes, you do not get off balance from the strokes, your strokes need less preparation and so u are able to keep pace with even faster rally.


    @Gerald
    I have the same problem, i cant think in doubles its too fast for me and I am often surprised from strokes my partner do etc..


    I can think when my partner is far worse or better than me, then i try to place my shots so that the opponents returns get to me or respectively to my partner with a higher possibility.
    The same is when one of my opponents is worse than the other...

    In singles I can think all the time and build up my rally, well at last as long I am able to dictate the pace.

    But in even double games i have no idea to build up a strategy so i just react and attack when possible. Can you explain how you think in doubles?

  5. #22
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    no one has mentioned split drop yet - it should help your movement a lot if you improve on this area.

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycril View Post
    it's a foul when moving when servicing right? i saw you drag your leg every-time you serve! visor was right, your partner is good, you should get more advice from him.
    serve doesn't start until the forward swing has started so any foot movement before this is moot.

  7. #24
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    probably would have been more suitable to post to here: http://www.badmintoncentral.com/foru...urself-playing as well

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by greblu View Post
    @GeraldI have the same problem, i cant think in doubles its too fast for me and I am often surprised from strokes my partner do etc.. I can think when my partner is far worse or better than me, then i try to place my shots so that the opponents returns get to me or respectively to my partner with a higher possibility.The same is when one of my opponents is worse than the other...In singles I can think all the time and build up my rally, well at last as long I am able to dictate the pace. But in even double games i have no idea to build up a strategy so i just react and attack when possible. Can you explain how you think in doubles?
    Hmm generally speaking in doubles if you're young and energetic then most of the you should be attacking so nothing wrong there.But it's not just about attacking every shot that comes to you. What you need is coordination training with your partner, so that when you attack, for example a straight smash, your partner in front is ready for the drive shots while you get ready to follow up with another smash or drive.For me, what's really important is how I cover for my partner when he attacks so that we appear very deadly and fast because our opponents can't recover the shots easily.Lots of Chinese theories I've learnt from my coach but hmm.. Doesn't sound right in English LOL! For a start you could try a combination of hard smashes and point smashes along with occasional drop shots.And at the front, make sure to have your rackets raise up and try to intercept straight flat shots your opponent might give by standing slightly towards left or right, towards where the shuttles is at.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by greblu View Post
    @GeraldI have the same problem, i cant think in doubles its too fast for me and I am often surprised from strokes my partner do etc.. I can think when my partner is far worse or better than me, then i try to place my shots so that the opponents returns get to me or respectively to my partner with a higher possibility.The same is when one of my opponents is worse than the other...In singles I can think all the time and build up my rally, well at last as long I am able to dictate the pace. But in even double games i have no idea to build up a strategy so i just react and attack when possible. Can you explain how you think in doubles?
    Hmm generally speaking in doubles if you're young and energetic then most of the you should be attacking so nothing wrong there.But it's not just about attacking every shot that comes to you. What you need is coordination training with your partner, so that when you attack, for example a straight smash, your partner in front is ready for the drive shots while you get ready to follow up with another smash or drive.For me, what's really important is how I cover for my partner when he attacks so that we appear very deadly and fast because our opponents can't recover the shots easily.Lots of Chinese theories I've learnt from my coach but hmm.. Doesn't sound right in English LOL! For a start you could try a combination of hard smashes and point smashes along with occasional drop shots.And at the front, make sure to have your rackets raise up and try to intercept straight flat shots your opponent might give by standing slightly towards left or right, towards where the shuttles is at.As you get better and comfortable with covering the court, that's when you would be able to easily explore other strategies with that speed foundation.So good luck practicing! Author of http://www.art-of-badminton.com/how-...badminton.html

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycril View Post
    sorry for being out topic, but i have to ask this. are there anymore good/better player around your area? Maybe you should come to countries like M'sia where badminton is too common. A place where you can find very pro/talented player and learn/copy their movement on court.
    There are good players in Germany, especially in doubles... And why would he need to move to Malaysia to find better players when Denmark is just above? But obviously going to training camp in Malaysia would be beneficial for almost anyone...

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