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  1. #18
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    I like the cover, you can use that one for even more air resitence to strengthen your fingers/forearm

  2. #19
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    What is the grip size available?

  3. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by CanucksDynasty View Post
    What is the grip size available?
    I don't see any grip size choice on the price list. However, the two I have received are g5.

    The racket does feel quite heavy and weights 122.88g on the scale with the plastic wrap on the grip (the other one weights 124.88g). With the cover it weights 154.69g.

    Just playing around with it, it feels SOLID, and it looks quite good as opposed to most training rackets out there. I love the matte finish.

    I also like that they tried to innovate with the cover, having small holes in it for less air resistance. But I'm not sure if that's really good or not since usually people use their cover for the extra air resistance.

  4. #21
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    The old covers that I have, you realistically can't use them to hit with. Doable? Yes. practical? No. The ones LJB has, has holes pre-punched on them, and they help a LOT in terms of adding weight but reducing the drag. I think this is a good compromise; just worried about the velcro fasteners.

  5. #22
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    So you'd use the cover to actually hit shuttles with it on the racket ?

  6. #23
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    With the old cover? Yup.

    With this TR1? I plan to

    Heck if you're gonna go as far as doing shadow strokes with em, might as well put a bird in play!

  7. #24
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    G5 grip size is perfect. I think I'll sell my 2 current training rackets (G4 grip size) and pick this one up.

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borbor View Post
    With the old cover? Yup.

    With this TR1? I plan to

    Heck if you're gonna go as far as doing shadow strokes with em, might as well put a bird in play!
    And it has enough bounce for the shuttle to reach the other side ? O.o Would seem like the shuttle wouldnt go very far lol

  9. #26
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    well we aren't talking about hitting baseline-baseline clears here

  10. #27
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    Never tried any other brand of training rackets, so I don't have any other product to compare to.

    But it's very playable, if restrung. I don't know what tension the factory strings were, but whatever they were it was crap Couldn't feel a damn thing (not surprised). Going to restring mine either tomorrow night or Mon night so I'll give another feedback after; but initial review is or 70 bucks, this is a pretty good buy IMO.

    With the cover it's a GREAT trainer for drives and smash defense. I mainly used it as a warmup racket today, but can already see how it could be beneficial to my front court coverage. Didn't really use it as a smash trainer because I dont' see how it necessarily can improve one's power in that regards.

    For guys who do wrist curls to dev forearm strength, a 120+ gram racket won't make a substantial difference, with the racket on @ 160 + the drag, it'll def be more beneficial.

  11. #28
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    Really love to see when Yonex shows 20-30lbs...but not on high end rackets.

  12. #29
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yan.v View Post
    I don't see any grip size choice on the price list. However, the two I have received are g5.

    The racket does feel quite heavy and weights 122.88g on the scale with the plastic wrap on the grip (the other one weights 124.88g). With the cover it weights 154.69g.

    Just playing around with it, it feels SOLID, and it looks quite good as opposed to most training rackets out there. I love the matte finish.

    I also like that they tried to innovate with the cover, having small holes in it for less air resistance. But I'm not sure if that's really good or not since usually people use their cover for the extra air resistance.
    i agree, i saw one last week and it was surprisingly good looking even with the neon pink design.

  13. #30
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    restrung the racket today and had a group training session putting the new strings in play

    LOVING this thing.

  14. #31
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    Hmm, I'm still not convinced on this concept of having a training racquet. I see it as another gimmick really and one that could do more bad than good.

    Given that every racquet feels slightly different, particularly for pros who look for differences between the same racquet, I think training with a racquet that is a lot different in terms of weight, balance and speed may not be a good thing.

    I can see the point of having a head heavy/heavier racquet to help develop a particularly skill/technique - I recommend head heavy racquets for beginners as it smooths out the stroke etc. But when you're an intermediate/advance/pro level player you ought to stick with a racquet that you're comfortable with, play with most and don't need to risk mistiming in a match.

    Whenever I pickup another racquet to play with, I need time to adjust. It could take anything from 10mins to never adjusting properly.

    I think it's unnecessary and just another artificial market pried open to please those gimmick hungry players which in reality serves little to no purpose.

  15. #32
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    By your reasoning, one should not do any types of resistance training either, because it might affect their timing when they go back onto the court and pickup their racket.

  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Borbor View Post
    By your reasoning, one should not do any types of resistance training either, because it might affect their timing when they go back onto the court and pickup their racket.
    Nope, that would be different. Resistance/strength training is not a sport, it doesn’t require you to engage your brain to the level needed for making precise movements, remembering the feel and touch of an action or timing.

    Yes, resistance training is an effective tool used mainly to target specific areas of your body in a controlled way. For example if you felt a particular muscle was not strong enough you'd target that though resistance training. It does not require a huge amount of thinking or feel and is not generally associated with badminton. You get a routine and do it.

    In badminton training, (assuming you're not a novice) you are targeting and fine tuning specific skills, techniques, strategies etc. Perhaps playing out an on-court scenario where you are required to engage your brain to hopefully develop a subconscious memory of how it is done. A bit like tying your shoe laces, you don't need to think about how you're going to do it once you’re able, your "learned" subconscious brain takes over even though it’s a relatively complex task if you think about it.

    Now if you start alternating the key bit of equipment that you depend on to play precise and consistent shots, of which many may rely on “feel”, you are constantly disrupting that intuitive/subconscious memory that your brain develops. It’s a bit like alternating from playing tennis and badminton all the time. Sure, you may develop strength in areas of your body that each sport demands but does it really benefit your badminton? If so, why don’t we all just buy a tennis racquet and play badminton with it instead?

    Anyhow, going back to my point that this is a gimmick. If it really does help, what is so different with a “training racquet” that you can’t get with another, possibly far cheaper low end heavy (and head heavy) racquet? Or even perhaps simply put a lead tape on your existing racquet? How did pros train before this came out?

    I’m struggling to think of a reason for having one, but I guess if you’re a professional player, sponsored by a racquet manufacturer who have supplied a free bespoke TR that is tailored to suit your preferences and that you need to maintain form due to say a prolonged time off from competition – there may be a case (although I'd doubt there would really be much advantage over your regular racquet). For us mere mortals, I guess the only benefit over your conventional training methods would be the ability to say “look at me, I’m using a Training Racquet”!?

    Let's agree to disagree! J

  17. #34
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    pros use training rackets too, and have been doing it for many years. before training rackets become popular, they use squash rackets, some even swing with tennis rackets.

    and then around 10 yrs ago, people start making training rackets which provide something that has the same geometry and general feel as regular badminton rackets. and since then it has slowly become more and more popular.

    here is a pic of Tan Boon Heong with a La Fleche training racket. photo taken in 2007 during China Open:





    I once played against a retired international player. got trashed pretty badly of course, and then after the match i notice he was playing against me with a 130grams training racket!

    nowadays there must be at least a dozen or so brands who has some sort of training rackets, weighing from 118gram all the way to 160grams. it is only a matter of time before Yonex jump on the bandwagon which they did finally.

    the only interesting thing about the Yonex entry is their take on how a training racket should be. instead of going after the super heavy weight 140+ grams, they went for light 118grams and a cover.

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