User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    206
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default String straightener?

    After stringing a few rackets I noticed my strings are straight compared to ones done professionally, although I've read in this forum that it doesn't matter too much.

    How do people straightener their strings after stringing their racket? Is there a tool or technique to make it look more aligned?

  2. #2
    Regular Member urameatball's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Drill-Sergeant Troll-Face
    Posts
    416
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    yes there is, it's widely available where I live, but probably not in London though.

    look up "hands".

    Very useful tool to have around you at all times. highly recommended. In fact, I have 2. One I use more regularly, and another as backup.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    206
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    lol I guess Drill-Sergeant Troll-Face does fit the description.

  4. #4
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    35,941
    Mentioned
    54 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    always straighten each string on every pull.

    there are a few good reasons for it.

    1. most important reason. straigtening a tensioned string will cause it to lose tension. if you wait till you are done, then you will suddenly lose a bunch of tension on the cross strings. so it is best to form the habit of straigtening while you pull (on a crank) or straighten during pull on a constant pull.

    2. less friction -> easier job. during the tension process, there is one less neighboring string pull on the cross string. this result in less friction and is easier to straighten. in fact, just a small nudge is all you need.

    3. while tensioning, your hand is not doing anything anyway, so use that time to straighten the string instead of having another procedure in the end, saves time.

    so always form a habit of straightening the string as you tension each one of them. and yes, use your fingers.

    you can see me doing that in this video. around 10:00 onwards.


  5. #5
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    4,214
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    My clamp bases have enough play in them to leave me with some bent crosses even when they're straightened in situ. I spend a good 2-3 mins after each job "squaring up".

    I did consider mocking something up to do this job - it'd be like a comb-cum-rake, and you'd just shove it against a cross and it would straighten. Anybody with a bandsaw could make one in about ten minutes.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    168
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    In my practice runs, I've been finishing the mains, tying them off and then starting the crosses. I see you tension all the mains, Kwun, then thread a couple of crosses, tie all three off and then carry on. I've seen this on other videos as well.

    Why is this?

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    206
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    My clamp bases have enough play in them to leave me with some bent crosses even when they're straightened in situ. I spend a good 2-3 mins after each job "squaring up".

    I did consider mocking something up to do this job - it'd be like a comb-cum-rake, and you'd just shove it against a cross and it would straighten. Anybody with a bandsaw could make one in about ten minutes.
    If you do make something like that and it works, send me the ebay link and I'll buy one

  8. #8
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    35,941
    Mentioned
    54 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Randomlegend View Post
    In my practice runs, I've been finishing the mains, tying them off and then starting the crosses. I see you tension all the mains, Kwun, then thread a couple of crosses, tie all three off and then carry on. I've seen this on other videos as well.

    Why is this?
    there is a shared hole at C10. leaving it untied while threading 2 cross saves a little bit of agony. that's all.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    206
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    How comes you use a flying clamp instead of the fix clamps for the cross?

  10. #10
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    4,214
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    there is a shared hole at C10. leaving it untied while threading 2 cross saves a little bit of agony. that's all.
    I thread the top five crosses while the (loose) mains are there - makes A7, A9 and A11 easier.

  11. #11
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    T.O
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuEVd-l4RSc

    For Tennis..
    But dense pattern string thing might work for badminton.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •