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  1. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonc108 View Post
    Why don't you learn their language in order to know what they are talking? I am learning...
    I'm not only like one player. I'm a fan from Lin Dan, LYD, Peter Gade and Saina Nehwal... Now you tell me I should learn Mandarin,korean,danish and Indian?
    German is my mother language. My parents are Vietnamese. So i also can speak vietnamese.In the school we have to learn the basic words in foreign language. So, I can speak a little bit english,french. When I watch an interview from LYD or LD, I always try to understand and looking for help to understand,what they say. So, I try my best.
    Peter Gade has a lot of fans world wide. That's why he can do interview in english. The same about LCW. In europe we really like LCW. And I've seen at All England or Swiss Open.Lilyana Natsir and Ahmad Tontowi just say thank you in english and the spectators really like that.
    I just want to say,it could be a huge advantage,when the young Players like LYD,Chen Long,Zhenming Wang etc... would learn english(for represent badminton,interviews,sponsor...)

  2. #19
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    Those are often times student volunteers who want to see badminton stars... On the other hand, it tells you that the organizers simply don't care what these Asian players have to say. They are neither fiancially or politically important, whatsoever.

    Quote Originally Posted by KB@TB Em View Post
    What I find damn annoying is that they donīt have good dolmetschers who can really translate what the stars have told. Surely some are nervous etc. but still that is the main problem as I see it.

  3. #20
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    I understand your point. I think they do understand English to some extent or are actually able to spell out some sentences. Some people are unwilling to do things in public if they can't do them perfectly. If otherwise being subject of jokes or causing misunderstandings, they would simply talk in their own languages and assume these translators will do a perfect job as they are expected to.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nismo333 View Post
    I'm not only like one player. I'm a fan from Lin Dan, LYD, Peter Gade and Saina Nehwal... Now you tell me I should learn Mandarin,korean,danish and Indian?
    German is my mother language. My parents are Vietnamese. So i also can speak vietnamese.In the school we have to learn the basic words in foreign language. So, I can speak a little bit english,french. When I watch an interview from LYD or LD, I always try to understand and looking for help to understand,what they say. So, I try my best.
    Peter Gade has a lot of fans world wide. That's why he can do interview in english. The same about LCW. In europe we really like LCW. And I've seen at All England or Swiss Open.Lilyana Natsir and Ahmad Tontowi just say thank you in english and the spectators really like that.
    I just want to say,it could be a huge advantage,when the young Players like LYD,Chen Long,Zhenming Wang etc... would learn english(for represent badminton,interviews,sponsor...)

  4. #21
    Regular Member milton's Avatar
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    Im sure hardly any English players can speak any other language such Chinese even though a large percentage of badminton followers are from China or other Asian countries. Infact I think few English people can speak a second language as language teaching in schools is poor. Therefore I see no reason why pro badminton players should speak a language from a comparatively small island (and im English). Although it would be good for them to learn a few basic phrases I agree.

  5. #22
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    There is a bit of misinformation on this thread about the education system in East Asian countries, but first I must respond to the idea that all badminton players should learn some English.

    As another poster pointed out earlier, the majority of badminton players and fans are those of East Asian descent, with the majority of those being of Chinese descent. It is a bit presumptuous to expect athletes to learn a little bit of English given that their main task is to play badminton. Furthermore, the athletes ability to communicate in English really has no representation on their individual country nor does it have a negative impact. You have taken a very western centric mindset and applied language standards to almost 1/4 the world's population, yet do not apply the same standards to westerners' ability (or lack thereof) to speak East Asian languages.

    As far as the Chinese and Japanese education systems go - I lived in China for 3 years, can speak, read and write as well as understand everything associated with Mandarin, and the one thing that is blatantly obvious is that English is part of their compulsory education. The majority of students begin learning it from an early age and continue into early adulthood, and it is also an important part of their national exam coming out of high school - the GaoKao. Furthermore, when in University, Chinese students have to take an another foreign language in addition to their English courses (most opt to take either French, Italian, or Japanese). The issue in language learning in the East Asian countries is that they have no venue to speak the language, leaving their communication abilities stuck at a very rudimentary level. They are also very embarrassed to speak foreign languages, so, when given the chance, they are less likely to do for fear of making mistakes. This could be the case with many athletes, who may in fact know bits and pieces of the English language, but are scared to speak it due to the image impact.

  6. #23
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nismo333 View Post
    Hello guys

    I've remarqued, that the most great players from China, or Korea, can't any words in English. I don't know why they don't learn some words or sentences. You're one of the best player and when you won a title, you just tell some words in your language....

    I know, it's not easy to learn a new language, but when you just say some words, the fans love that. It doesn't matter, when you say some wrong words or when the sentences is not correct. We know what they mean, so that's ok. I think, it also represent your country much better than a dolmetscher.

    I hope some chinese or korean guys here in the Forum could tell that to the professional players. Or maybe you have a reason, why they don't want to learn english or maybe a second language.

    Cheers
    .
    Currently, most Badminton players participating in tournaments, are attending as national teams.

    Badminton players are not like Tennis players (as found Li Na being quoted) who attend tournaments as individuals.

    We hope in future, all national teams should include interpreters to help their players participating in another country, not only at interviews, but also to help them in other needs, like for travel, accommodation, meals, shopping, etc, etc, ......
    .

  7. #24
    Regular Member V1lau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nismo333 View Post
    Hello guys

    I've remarqued, that the most great players from China, or Korea, can't any words in English. I don't know why they don't learn some words or sentences. You're one of the best player and when you won a title, you just tell some words in your language....

    I know, it's not easy to learn a new language, but when you just say some words, the fans love that. It doesn't matter, when you say some wrong words or when the sentences is not correct. We know what they mean, so that's ok. I think, it also represent your country much better than a dolmetscher.

    I hope some chinese or korean guys here in the Forum could tell that to the professional players. Or maybe you have a reason, why they don't want to learn english or maybe a second language.

    Cheers
    Hello guys

    I've Remarque, that the most people from UK, or Europe, can't win a super series. I don't know why they don't learn better strokes or footwork. Denmark is very good, why you can’t be like them.

    I know, it's not easy to learn a new strokes or footwork, but when you make it to the final, the fans love that. It doesn't matter, if you lose in the final or when the score is lopsided. We know that u tried, so that's ok. I think, it also represent your country much better than a dolmetscher.

    I hope some UK or Europe guys here in the Forum could tell that to the professional players. Or maybe you have a reason, why they don't want to learn new strokes or footwork.

    Trollings
    Last edited by V1lau; 03-18-2013 at 09:19 PM.

  8. #25
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    There are a couple of other issues connected with the language thing, which are not so immediately apparent.

    Many countries either insist (lay down the law?) that their top athletes - those considered to be unofficial "ambassadors" or international stars - should interact with the international media only in their official language. This is not about China - many other countries also adopt this policy. So even if say, Wang Lin could converse with the media in English, she would not, if she were being guided by this policy. Not saying this is the CBA/China policy, but for all I know, it could well be. It could also well be the policy for other countries/teams/players.

    It is very, very VERY incumbent on BWF to provide for capable, articulate and professional interpreters! They are doing a disservice to the game by letting the broadcasters and organisers to get away with obviously ill-equipped -but surely well-meaning - "translators" to act as uncomfortable go-betweens. I would think that at about 95% of all SS/SSP venues, obtaining interpreters with multi-language proficiency would not at all be a problem. It would not break the bank, either. But it would increase appreciation of the game and some of its biggest stars.

    Thanks to an enlightening post by our new member @Mulletious
    Last edited by cobalt; 03-18-2013 at 09:32 PM.

  9. #26
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    On the subject of translators, BWF should ask BC members. Often times the translations are poor. Being an English forum, BC members can do & have done a better job

  10. #27
    Moderator drifit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglehelang View Post
    On the subject of translators, BWF should ask BC members. Often times the translations are poor. Being an English forum, BC members can do & have done a better job
    english
    malay
    mandarin
    hakka
    hokkien
    am i eligible for that?

    by the way, China has so many dialects. i dont understand most of them, not even 1-2 words in their single phrase. they learn their own dialect in school and mandarin.

  11. #28
    Regular Member suetyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglehelang View Post
    On the subject of translators, BWF should ask BC members. Often times the translations are poor. Being an English forum, BC members can do & have done a better job
    we shall promote BC as the official forum to BWF.

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by drifit View Post
    english
    malay
    mandarin
    hakka
    hokkien
    am i eligible for that?

    by the way, China has so many dialects. i dont understand most of them, not even 1-2 words in their single phrase. they learn their own dialect in school and mandarin.
    In that case Drifit, you can do the translations for certain press articles here too. Then eagle can relax.
    Malay to English, Mandarin/Hokkein/Hakka to English all you tapau.
    Wait, Mandarin to English, English to Mandarin for tourneys let suetyan & other chinese ed BCer have the honours. China & Taiwan players speak the 'official' Mandarin in public, shouldnt be a problem with dialects
    Last edited by eaglehelang; 03-19-2013 at 06:30 AM.

  13. #30
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    If you watched CL vs JOJ in all england semis when they shook hands and embraced CL did speak a little bit english "thank you thank you" was all i can make out lol

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by **KZ** View Post
    If you watched CL vs JOJ in all england semis when they shook hands and embraced CL did speak a little bit english "thank you thank you" was all i can make out lol
    oh yes, you could be right ! Nice!

  15. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidget View Post
    I understand the OP's point of view. When you admire a player, you wish you could hear them speak or read their words in press clippings or on their fan page.

    But when one's goals and whole day are taken up trying to be the best in the world at something, you can understand if they don't spend a lot of time on languages. Especially if they don't have the gift for languages, or grew up in a unilingual area like much of China and North America.

    Personally I have realized my failings in French, Vietnamese and Cantonese, so I can easily forgive my hero, Sony Dwi Kuncoro, for not being fluent in English. (Darn you SDK!)
    Nonsense! China is very far from being an unilingual area! Get real

  16. #33
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    Actually english courses are compulsory for the players of the CHN team. But the policy is quite new and will be have effects only after a laps of time.
    I think badminton is a very international affair, and to speak english is a necessity for players. The country have to provide for the education of their players - to only focus on the sport is unfair to them and contrary to a good approach of sports - and languages should be a very important part of their cursus.

  17. #34
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    The common language for communication for all critical operations worldwide is English. Air Traffic Controllers and airline pilots for example, need to have the ability to communicate clearly in English. It reduces the chances of messing up the countryside with unwanted airline and body parts.

    That being said, badminton is still far from being classified as a critical operations area, worldwide...

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