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  1. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by StefanDO View Post
    Advanced attacking formation suggests that he/she should stand slightly more to the other side of the court ...
    That's not 'advanced attacking formation' - it's ceding the straight net area - the easiest return for your opponent, and it is saying "I don't trust my partner's attack". If it truly is advanced, why don't you see it in GP/SS matches?

  2. #36
    Regular Member StefanDO's Avatar
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    As I emphasized, the attacker's partner still has to cover the straight net returns, which is not so easy as I must admit - that's why I'd say it's suitable rather for advanced players.

    Sorry I forgot to mention that this 'advanced attacking formation' applies to situations in which the attacker at the rear court is already under pressure, i.e. if he has smashed and the opponent returned it to the other rear corner. Before this scenario, the attacker's partner should rather stand a bit more on the side of the attacker.

    You can see it in this video:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xhmrFwdLA8w

  3. #37
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    Not sure if this has been mentioned yet, but following on from Matt's point about the front player covering cross-court:

    Think about the situation where the lift is 1/2 or 3/4 court. You are now in a great position for smashing, but where does your partner go?

    Often it will be best for your partner to adopt a cross-court position, clearing a path and signalling to you that you are free to follow the smash forwards to the net. In this case, you are covering all the straight shots, and he is covering all the cross-court shots. This is one example of doubles "rotation".

    If your partner stays in the "standard" channel attack position here, then you can end up occupying almost the same part of the court. Sometimes your partner will be too close, and you will worry about hitting him!

    Note also that it is very difficult to smash from (one side of) the midcourt and cover any cross-court defence -- especially a cross-court lift or drive.

    This is just one example, of course. As Matt has already pointed out, there are other situations where this position could be effective too.

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