User Tag List

Page 3 of 48 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... LastLast
Results 35 to 51 of 800
  1. #35
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Are you thinking of a digital or film camera? Also, are you thinking of an SLR or a rangefinder camera (for film -- digital SLR's are still expensive)? For a film SLR, you will probably not need a shutter speed of 1/4000. I have never used the 1/2000 speed in my old SLR. Generally, 1/1000 is a fast enough shutter speed to catch the action. A fast lens or lenses is/are necessary to capture action shots and f2.8 is the slowest lens you should consider for action shots. Ideally, you should have an f1.2 or f1.8. You might also want a telephoto lens to catch distance action. for a 35mm camera, a 100mm or 135mm fixed focus might be good. Fixed focus lenses are usually faster than zoom lenses but not as convenient for framing the action.

    Ron

  2. #36
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    Posts
    326
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I am thinking of digital camera. Any suggestions?

  3. #37
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    36,148
    Mentioned
    55 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    hm... what's your budget? and how proficient are you when you come to taking photos?

    imho, for badminton, a low f-stop is way more important than a fast shutter speed. due to the low light condition, you will never ever get to use the 1/4000. from my experience, you will be lucky to get 1/500.

    but anyhow, if you are going digital and have lots of budget, a SLR will give the best quality. i don't have any preference towards Canon/Nikon. but i say spend the money on a good lens. depending on the situation, i think the best and affordable lens will be a 80-200/2.8 and a couple of fix focals like 50/1.8 for times when you can stand right next to the court, and a really wide one like a 24/2.8 for those wild wide angle perpective view of the court. i cannot afford the 80-200/2.8 so i only have a 50/1.8 and 24/2.8.

    i think Raphael use a Canon 300/4.

    as for the point-n-shoot prosumer type, i don't really know. i only have a cheapo point-n-shoot, not much to that one.

    where were you sitting during the SC?

  4. #38
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You will probably not get to take good pictures for badminton with the current line-up of consumer digital cameras. I am not an expert on digital cameras, but most consumer grade digital cameras tend to have slow lenses. Good quality optics are expensive to make and the advances/cost reductions in electronic production have not been followed by comparable advances/cost reductions in optic production. That said, most consumer digital cameras have slow lenses for use with flash. The fixed focal length lens cameras are a bit faster than the zooms lens cameras, but you will get speeds of f4.0-6.3 or something in that range. Even with high ISO settings, that is generally too slow given the lighting in a court without flash. Do not use the flash as it will irritate players. Also given the distance to the court, the flash will be basically worthless (I always laugh when I see a flash go off in a huge stadium as the flash is worthless in such situations). The flash built into most cameras usually has an effective range of about 10 to 15 feet (high output separates with fast and telephoto lenses have a longer effective range). You will need to balance faster shutter speed (to freeze the action) with having enough light and depth of field. Anything slower than f2.8 will make capturing badminton action difficult. You will probably not want to use shutter speeds faster than 1/500 (probably not 1/250) because you will not have enough light in such situations.

    The semi-pro, non-SLR digital cameras have better and faster optics and will be appropriate but these cameras are costly. If you can afford it, get a pro SLR digital body. That way, you get the entire range of lenses to use. Unfortunately, such a setup will be in the range of US$30,000++ (way outside my or most people's budget). A good pro body is US$10,000, and the full lineup of pro-grade super fast lenses will be equally expensive. I would not buy the current pro SLR body even if I can afford it because digital technology is improving rapidly. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for optical technology.

    Your best cost-effective bet is to get a film based reasonably priced consumer SLR and buy relatively fast fixed focus (prime) lenses. You should have lenses that are f2.8 or faster. I would get a 50mm f1.4, a 85mm f1.2 or f1.8, and a 135mm f2.0 or f2.8. A 200mm f2.8 will be nice but this lens will be very expensive and heavy. Avoid cheap zoom lenses as they are too slow for action photography. A pro-grade super fast 80-200mm will be nice but this will also be a very expensive lens. Use fast speed film with either apature priority at the widest lens opening or shutter priority at 1/250 and hope for the best. If you have a good program mode for action/sports, you can use use the program mode. Do not use the general program mode as you will not get good results.

    Ron
    Last edited by ronk; 04-15-2003 at 11:36 AM.

  5. #39
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    Posts
    326
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smile thanks

    Ronk & Kwun, thanks for your help; with the advice & http://dpreview.com/ I think I can make a good choice.

    And to answer the question: I was not sitting any particular place at SC but i moved around for the whole week (was there as a Dutch reporter as well as a badminton fan). Are you also going to the World Championships?

    Cheers,

    - Mark.

  6. #40
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    So Mark,

    What model of digital camera did you decide will work? Just curious.

    Ron

  7. #41
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    Posts
    326
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm planning to buy one this summer, but already orientating myself on the market
    Hoping for some good new releases before that time.

    Nikon and Canon seem to be give good cameras that suit my specification, but I did not make any decision yet. I have to check out the prices of the lenses you mentioned, too. Anyway, I'll show you the pictures once I bought a camera

  8. #42
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Originally posted by Zax
    I'm planning to buy one this summer, but already orientating myself on the market
    Hoping for some good new releases before that time.

    Nikon and Canon seem to be give good cameras that suit my specification, but I did not make any decision yet. I have to check out the prices of the lenses you mentioned, too. Anyway, I'll show you the pictures once I bought a camera
    zax, if you next time take a look at the crowd of photographers when you go to watch soccer, basket ball or badminton match, you'll realize the answer is there: for sports photography the best choice is: Canon EOS + USM EF lens. that's why we always see those eye-catching long white lenses: they are Canon USM EF lenses mounted on Canon EOS bodies.

    Canon USM EF lenses are optically and mechanically fast. Nikon's "new" Silent Wave Motor looks very similar but inferior to USM. Nikon is good at making bodies: solid and therefore the choice for most of journalists and some nature photographers. but that's all.

    Canon has IS----image stablizer which has already been applied to most of its pro lenses. Nikon has a similar tech called VR----vibration reduction which is unfortunately slightly inferior to IS and narrowly applied to only few Nikon lenses.

    and zax, pls don't go for digital camera for sports photography. Reason being that, Prosumer digital cameras all tend to response very slowly to shutter release or say the delay (time after you click the shutter release and before the camera opens the shutter) is too long for sports photography. you'll always miss the RIGHT moment. We can't everytime "predict" the movement of the player and shoot in advance of the exat time of the delay: like throwing bombs off from a B-52.

    EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM mounted on a Canon EOS Elan 7e or EOS 3 is a good start. All together costs USD 2,000-2,500.
    Last edited by sluggish; 04-19-2003 at 01:23 AM.

  9. #43
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, United States
    Posts
    36,148
    Mentioned
    55 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    sluggish has a good point about the shutter reaction speed. janet was holding the point-n-shoot digicam during the SC and she didn't managed to get any action shot timed right. i was using a regular SLR and that was much more predictable.

    however, i think the AF speed of the camera lens is less of a concern in badminton, likely we won't be chasing any action, but instead focusing on one place in the court and wait till the actions goes there. the location of action in badminton is much more predictable than soccer and basketball. you know that sooner or later, the player will get to the front of the court and do a tumble there, you might as well just fix the exposure and focus and just wait there.

    i wonder if Raphael has any comments on it.

  10. #44
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Kwun is right about that, when you don't have a fast camera, the best is to focus on one point of the court and wait until the player comes in this special spot to shoot.
    For your information, I use a D30 Canon with 80-200 USM Lens f2.8

    The speed of the camera doesn't need to be over 1000 because you'll never get enough light to go further than this exposure.

    However, one important thing to keep in mind is to be able to go into high ISO (I use mainly 800 or 1600). The speed of the button to shoot is also important. Of course, the two best cams for badminton are Nikon D1 X and Canon EOS 1D

    But I'm sure that MArk will find a camera that's good enough to take good badminton shots. I heard that Camedia's from Olympus were not bad.

    Good luck ;-)

    Raphael

  11. #45
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Originally posted by Raphy
    For your information, I use a D30 Canon with 80-200 USM Lens f2.8
    Raphael, do you mean the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 USM? that's a good lens!

    and as a suggestion for digital camera, Canon EOS 10D is not a bad choice. Enough resolution (6 megapixels), enough control over it. the body is newly designed, not based on any exist EOS SLR, but it looks quite close to EOS 30 (EOS 7E in Japan or Elan 7E in USA) which is a good camera too.

  12. #46
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The problem with digital is either it is slow or expensive. Some digital SLRs are not full frame with the advantages and disadvantages of not being full frame. I was looking at the specs of the Canon 1DS and it is 11megapixels and the shutter lag is 55ms. That is fantastic but it cost US$8000. I would use a super fast 200mm f2.8 with IS. The 70-200mm would also be a good choice.

    If I were you, I would get a relatively cheap film SLR (but not too cheap) with sports program modes and a decent autofocusing system (not the 7 zone with the real cheap slr). Spend the money to get quality lenses like the Canon 70-200mm f2.8 usm is or the Nikon equivalent. In a few years when digital SLR become better (at least 10megapixels) and cheaper, you can go digital but still use the quality lenses you get at this time. The lenses should still be usable and lens prices will not drop unlike digital slr bodies.

    I am still using a manual focus Canon SLR.

    Ron

  13. #47
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i think exactly the same as ron does.

    one of the advantages for non-full-frame (35mm-wise) DSLRs in the market, which include almost every digital camera except Canon EOS 1Ds, is that your lenses work *like* longer ones than on 35mm film cameras. therefore a normal zoom can serve as a telezoom however the former can be much cheaper.

    if one won't feel it's costy when his fifteen-thousand-buck Canon EOS 10D body becomes outdated 3 years later, it's highly recommended. i think it's all about personal habbits of spending money.

    but as one of the poor, i tend to see my hard-earned bucks go to the glass *first*, whose qualities have almost reached the limit and value/price maintains all the time. in other words, if i get them 5 years later, i won't get significantly better ones or at significantly cheaper prices. this is true-r for Canon EF lens, for Nikkor, there's still a long way to go. however, personally I feel happy to wait and see the resolution of digital cameras going up and prices going down while holding my money in hand.

    although the current digital cameras serve very well for most of the casual moments, technically there're a lot people can do on CCD and CMOS to improve there performance and lower down the cost of manufacture. in fact, Foveon's X3 tech is a superior solution in theory to mosaic sensors like CCD and CMOS which are genetically deficient but unfortunately dominating the market. but as a private company Feveon's progress is rather slow and there's the possibility to be kicked out if they can't catch up.

    so, to buy a digital point n shoot camera is absolutely okay, it can do everying what it's supposed to do well; but to buy a digital slr the right time has yet to come financial-wise and tech-wise. a good way to go for digital at this time might be scanning film with a Nikon coolscan.

  14. #48
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    Posts
    326
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up

    Clearly the digital cameras are developing rapidly, as I can also see from the timeline on dpreview.com. I noticed that canon 10d has 22.7 x 15.1 mm CMOS sensor. The market of lenses is more stable, thanks for the advice!

  15. #49
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default F70

    Hello. Sidetracking a little. Yes athe Nikon F70 is a wonderful camera but no longer being manufactured.
    Currently using one for photo slides of my patients requiring complex dental treatment.
    Cheung, hope you take good care of the F70.

  16. #50
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    276
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: F70

    Originally posted by elvinlwj
    Hello. Sidetracking a little. Yes athe Nikon F70 is a wonderful camera but no longer being manufactured.
    Currently using one for photo slides of my patients requiring complex dental treatment.
    Cheung, hope you take good care of the F70.
    Sorry to turn all Geekish and threadjack, but can you give some stats on the Nikon F70; is that a motordrive on the side? I thought it was digital at first, because of that. What's the maximum aperture size on the lens you're using (that's the standard fixed 50mm lens?) and shutter speed range? I'm currently using a Pentax K1000 w. Tamron wideangle-Telephoto 20-200, a Canon F-1 w. 1.5f 28mm lens, a borrowed Canon digital SLR, and a borrowed Kodak DX4330 for quick low-res digital pics. I've been looking for a new camera for a while. Do you know if Nikon made a manual SLR with a fixed/wide-angle lens with a max aperture of 1.4? I need a new manual camera with a shutterspeed which goes down at least to 1/32 - 1/16 and a fixed/fisheye lens with a maximum aperture <f2 for indoor work without a flash. I'd go for a medium format cam, but they're too bulky and far too expensive.
    Last edited by ynexfan2003; 11-12-2003 at 12:00 AM.

  17. #51
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default F70

    Hi there.
    Just to let you know that i am no camera geek.
    It is just that I have tried a few cameras and I find the F70 to be the most reliable FOR MY PURPOSE(ie phto taking for clinical procedures).
    One way is to visit a Nikon distributor in your region and ask for a catalogue of Nikon products.
    The Nikon Coolpix series seems to be an affordable digital camera model line. They really give good resolution.
    I am using a Micro-Nikkor f-105 lens with magnifiaction up to 1:0.8 so I am not familiar with the fish-eye type.
    Yes I think the F70 body does have a motor-drive.

Page 3 of 48 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Badminton Photography
    By DoublesPlease in forum CCC Badminton Club
    Replies: 40
    : 10-01-2007, 05:32 AM
  2. Lens for Badminton Photography
    By Sealman in forum Badminton Photography
    Replies: 13
    : 03-07-2007, 10:34 PM
  3. Badminton Photography
    By Shabok in forum Chit-Chat
    Replies: 685
    : 09-30-2006, 03:02 AM
  4. earlier years of Badminton Tournaments Photography
    By omnislazh in forum Market Place
    Replies: 0
    : 06-28-2005, 04:32 PM
  5. Photography
    By Virocon in forum General Forum
    Replies: 2
    : 03-15-2003, 11:32 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •