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  1. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squirter
    There's something I've noticed concerning string tensions. If you check www.blackknight.ca, most rackets have a recommended string tension of around 17-21lbs. I find this pretty strange, considering the ideal tensions everyone is posting.
    That would be the ideal tension for the newer players. It's usually the case that tension preference will go up as your skill increases. As you increase tension, you'd have to compromise the power to gain better control.

    You can think of a high tensioned racket as a flat cement wall. There's better angle accuracy but waaay less power.
    You can think of a really loosely strung racket as a soccer goal net. If it's too loose, it wouldn't bounce back. So my conclusion is that a racquet has a specific tension which gives maximum power, which is 17-21lbs.

  2. #138
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    Just like others have mentioned before, you could grow with it or just stay comfortable with one tension. Upping the tension will force you to adapt and change your timing... to an extent. For ultra high tensions (30lbs and above), nothing short of perfect timing, strength and skill will do. You will eventually hit harder with high tension setting using better timing and technique, not just strength. If arm strength is the only main factor for you to hit harder, you'll eventually development joint problems.

    Majority of racquet demise are from clashes, so mis-hits with high tensioned racquets wouldn't compromise the frame as much as the shot and perhaps the string too. With a trusted experienced stringer, today's racquet models can take 25lbs and over easily.

    Quote Originally Posted by ting03
    hmm, i've been getting all my recent restrings @ 23 lbs of BG 65, and it's very comfortable for me as i've gotten used to using 23. when i hit the birdie it feels crisp and solid, however maybe i should string it at 25 the next time? like you say....is there THAT much of a diff from 23 to 25??? more control perhaps? power?? i'm just afraid that @ 25lbs any slight mis hit might break my racquet.... it won't will it?

    oh btw, i think the ideal tension is around 21 lbs (more or less 1 lb) becuz most beginners start off with a prestrung racquet, so it'll be around that tension.

    It's comfortable enough for beginners, yet still ok to a certain extent for more imtermidiate/advanced players so i think that 21lbs is the ideal tension. (even tho i string mine a bit higher )

  3. #139
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    Default my tension

    my AT500 is strung at 23 lbs, i think the tension range is 20-25 lbs, so u c its in the middle. Really, the ideal tension really depends on your raquet as some raquets can support 30 lbs and some can't, so:

    20-25 lbs tension range raquet: 23 lbs is ideal
    15-20 lbs tension range raquet: 19 lbs is ideal
    25-30 lbs tension range raquet: 28 lbs is ideal

    <<<<< THESE NUMBERS REFLECT MY OPINION AND NOT OTHER PEOPLES >>>>>


    <<<<THANK YOU FOR READING MY POST, COME AGAIN ANOTHER DAY>>>>

  4. #140
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    I thought about this question long and hard too..... Whatever the racket is strung at from manufacturers... normally 18-20 lbs is perfect for beginners.

    I have just had all my rackets strung at 23lbs cause it seems to be perfect tension for an advanced player with alot of strength (not saying I have alot of strength !... but my brother who is county player has his rackets at 22lbs to 23lbs too).

    I never knew rackets can be strung at 28lb or even 30 or 40lbs !! doesn't that make the frame weaker and more prone to break ? i.e. for example NS8000.

    What are the advantages, if any of having rackets strung at 30lbs+ ? and what is the tension of rackets strung by professional players ? i.e. DL, taufik and co.

  5. #141
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    Taufik Hidayat usually has his rackets strung at 32 lbs with bg-66.
    Peter Gade has his strung to 35 lbs with bg-65.

    A lot of these players like the very high tension because of the control they feel from higher tension, not power.

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeymagic
    What are the advantages, if any of having rackets strung at 30lbs+ ? and what is the tension of rackets strung by professional players ? i.e. DL, taufik and co.

  6. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeymagic
    I never knew rackets can be strung at 28lb or even 30 or 40lbs !! doesn't that make the frame weaker and more prone to break ? i.e. for example NS8000.
    Is it really possible to string to 40 pounds?!

  7. #143
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    I never knew rackets can be strung at 28lb or even 30 or 40lbs !! doesn't that make the frame weaker and more prone to break ? i.e. for example NS8000.
    Yes, that does make the frame weaker. But pro's have so many spare ones!

    The NS8000 tends to break more easily, mainly because of its thinner frame, compared to Armortecs.

  8. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by wing-hong
    Hi,

    I've a 20+years old Kawasaki Graphite G01 which I'm now using as a spare. It was probably the 1st generation all graphite racket and was a very good one at that time.

    The recommended tension sticker on the cone has long gone. Has anyone got any idea about the tension for this racket ?

    wing-hong
    I was using this racquet between 1979-1983 in Hong Kong. I was using gut at that time stung at #26. It can take up to #28 because of the square rim construction ( not at all aerodynamic). The head is very heavy so make sure you adjust the balance point acording to you playing style. Putting the balance point too far back will defect the purpose of this offensive racquet. Balance point at 285-290 seems to be logical with this racquet.

    Other factors to consider: (1) brand and weight of the string you are going to use. For example, Gosen Pro-70 is heavier than GS-80; the balance point may move up by an inch. (2) Temperature and humidity of the location where you play. In Vancouver, Canada, I string Gosen GS-80 at #24/26 in summer and #20/22 in Winter; otherwise you will not get the loud popping sound as advertised. When the tension is over stung, you will not get the feel when you hit. In Hong Kong, I'd put it to #27/29. (3) Level of players. High level players are harder hitters and you need to use higher tension to reduce the residing time so as to get better control. (4) Size of the hall in which you play. You need more power in a larger hall (8 courts hall), that means lesser tension in bigger hall.

  9. #145
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    Quote Originally Posted by quintessence
    (4) Size of the hall in which you play. You need more power in a larger hall (8 courts hall), that means lesser tension in bigger hall.
    Why??

    Thanks.

  10. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by HKChua
    Why??

    Thanks.
    Standard tournaments are played in an 8 courts hall. A spacious hall will have stronger current affecting the flight of the shuttle to make it slower. If your practising hall is a small 4 courts hall, you will have to increase your power to produce the same distance or speed in a bigger hall. One way to adjust is to lower your usual tension by #2 during such tournament. If you adjust well in large hall in most of your training seesions, you will not be affected and you need not to decrease your usual string tension.
    Last edited by quintessence; 10-06-2005 at 06:26 AM.

  11. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by quintessence
    Standard tournaments are played in an 8 courts hall. A spacious hall will have stronger current affecting the flight of the shuttle to make it slower. If your practising hall is a small 4 courts hall, you will have to increase your power to produce the same distance or speed in a bigger hall. One way to adjust is to lower your usual tension by #2 during such tournament. If you adjust well in large hall in most of your training seesions, you will not be affected and you need not to decrease your usual string tension.
    Your argument is confused

    Large halls may or may not have an air current that affects the shuttle. Well designed halls should not have such a current.

    If there is an air current, then it may or may not be directed towards your side of the court. If it is directed away from your side, then the air current will actually increase the speed of your strokes. This was a problem in the Athens Olympics, where the air conditioning "drift" caused many players to hit the shuttle long.

  12. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Your argument is confused

    Large halls may or may not have an air current that affects the shuttle. Well designed halls should not have such a current.

    If there is an air current, then it may or may not be directed towards your side of the court. If it is directed away from your side, then the air current will actually increase the speed of your strokes. This was a problem in the Athens Olympics, where the air conditioning "drift" caused many players to hit the shuttle long.
    I'm referring to general situations. Special cases would be better answered by an architect.

  13. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by quintessence
    I'm referring to general situations. Special cases would be better answered by an architect.
    Your argument is still confused, even for what you call "general situations".

    Read carefully:

    Suppose that a large hall has air currents that consistently slow down the shuttle. These air currents must, therefore, be travelling (mostly) in a direction opposed to the shuttle flight.

    So if you play from the other end of the court, the air currents will be travelling (mostly) in the same direction as the shuttle flight. Therefore they will make the shuttle travel faster/further.

    There is no environment in which the air currents will consistently make the shuttle slower for players at both ends of the court.

  14. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Your argument is still confused, even for what you call "general situations".

    Read carefully:

    Suppose that a large hall has air currents that consistently slow down the shuttle. These air currents must, therefore, be travelling (mostly) in a direction opposed to the shuttle flight.

    So if you play from the other end of the court, the air currents will be travelling (mostly) in the same direction as the shuttle flight. Therefore they will make the shuttle travel faster/further.

    There is no environment in which the air currents will consistently make the shuttle slower for players at both ends of the court.


    Actually I don't want to argue with you because I'm not an architect and we are not talking badminton anymore. If you have doubt about this topic, please experiment it yourself or find a better person who can answer your question.

    To the best of my knowledge, most air conditioning ducts are on the floor. Air moves upward and hovering in the ceiling. Hot air moves upwards as well. It will hover in the ceiling too. When you are performing high clear, these currents (or better to call them layers of thicker air) will block the flight of the shuttle, making it harder to tavel 44 feet from rear court to rear court.
    Last edited by quintessence; 10-06-2005 at 08:56 AM.

  15. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by quintessence

    To the best of my knowledge, most air conditioning ducts are on the floor. Air moves upward and hovering in the ceiling. Hot air moves upwards as well. It will hover in the ceiling too. When you are performing high clear, these currents (or better to call them layers of thicker air) will block the flight of the shuttle, making it harder to tavel 44 feet from rear court to rear court.
    i thought hotter air speeds up the shuttle?

  16. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by other
    i thought hotter air speeds up the shuttle?
    In an 8 courts hall, how high is the ceiling? You must be very good to reach half way. You bring up one good point though: larger hall is much actually cooler than a smaller hall.

    What goes up, must comes down. The cumulating layers of air in the ceiling will form a downward flow and there will be a constant pressure acting downward as well. Go for a 16 court tournament to experience yourself, then you'll know.

  17. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by quintessence
    If you have doubt about this topic, please experiment it yourself or find a better person who can answer your question.
    No, I don't have any doubt about this topic.

    I have played in 16 court halls and 1 court rooms. I have never observed a correlation between hall size and shuttle speed.

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