User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    201
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Question How Do We Measure The Level Of Play?

    Hi all,

    I've tried searching but not able to find threads as the topic. I just wish to know how do we actually measure or rate the level of play for normal badminton players (not on the professional or national circuit)? Or is there even anyway we are able to do that?
    Last edited by soccerking888; 04-10-2013 at 10:07 PM.

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    aberdeen
    Posts
    602
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Let have some fun on this topic. There are 2 keys. 1st one is back hand. 2nd is people reaction. If your back hand return is weak, you are forever a beginner. If you can do back hand drop, you are at intermediate level. If you can do back hand clear from baseline to baseline clear, you are intermediate plus. If you can do back hand smack, you can beat 90% of the players. The fun part is people reacting to you on court. If everybody want to play with you, then you are the best in this particular club. If most players want to play with you, then you are at intermediate level. If only a few people want to play with you, then beginner is your label. If everybody leaves as soon as you step on court, you better bring your mother with you.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    59
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If everybody leaves as soon as you step on court, you need to buy some deodorant.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Munich, Germany
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I rate players on:
    • how fast and agile they are; this includes footwork
    • how clean their shots are; meaning a clear should better fall damn near to the baseline or a dropshot should have the right speed and target point.

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think this is relative to other players in your club. You can be a beginner in one club and an intermediate in another. I always do an overhead on my backhand side, so I never really learn to hit a backhand. But I improve in other areas of my game, so other players want to play with me. I found what happens rather is that people who know one another well tend to stick with playing together because they are usually at similar levels.

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It's difficult to quantify - and as rayvinly said it'll depend on the club. Where I play has a system with 5 grades, and the club pro/coaches use a set of criteria to determine who will fall into which grade.

    I think the key areas to look for are:
    • Consistency
    • Footwork
    • Positioning
    • Tactics/Controlling the game
    • Cleanliness of technique and shot quality


    With each area being improved upon equally as one advances. At higher levels things like deception, power and athleticism become more important.

    But more importantly, shoes and racquets - the more money spent on these, the better the player (obviously!)
    Last edited by DRead; 06-19-2013 at 03:05 AM.

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Kathmandu,Nepal
    Posts
    6
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    We have to look the performance of the players is that good or bad.If they are playing nervousily then we have to know they are not playing properly or worse. From this type of feelings we can measure the Level mof play.

  8. #8
    Regular Member Tadashi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It highly depends on what you mean by "measuring."

    If you want to select a team for competition, and future potential, then there are tons of test indicators you can use to judge the quality of a player. How fast can you run the four corners, for example, or what is your heart rate after three minutes of stepping up a ladder, and many other things.

    Problem, of course, it takes a lot of effort to get these info, hence testing. A popular but scientifically completely invalid shortcut: smash speed, the faster, the better - simple, eh?

    If you want to judge a player's level of play by hindsight, say, watching him on video, or live on court, you already can draw distinctions just by stature and physical look.

    Lower legs and forearm muscles tell a lot. If you can see NO prominent muscles there, the player may not be too difficult. If you can see prominent muscles there, indeed, there are two types. Either, it is a body builder for sake of body building, then he may lack the training for speeding up his nerves and coordination - hence powerful but lazy and slow; or he truly is a quite threatening player of fast power-up ability. Tall players have a natural advantage, but they seldom jump and their jump abilites are quite weak. Skinny players are extremely enduring just by the nature of muscle-body relation.

    And then there are tacticals ... too many ways, don't a simple shortcut to it.

    Final point, Lee Chong Wei can do benchpressing with heavy weights similar to other players but 130 ranks below him! So, fitness is a must, but not a sufficient criteria, too.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •