User Tag List

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 18 to 34 of 53
  1. #18
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    9,486
    Mentioned
    114 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Well...as long as you as a stringer is consistent in your method and produce a lively stringbed with a reproducible dominant frequency, then that is all that is important.

  2. #19
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Toronto & Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    703
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    unless specifically told...I have always interpreted "24 lbs" as 23x25.3 lbs instead of 22x24.2 (i see this as 23 lbs when i string) or 24x26.4 (i see this as 25 lbs when i string).

    Although this is not exact i let my new clients know how i interpret their specified tension.

  3. #20
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    330
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DarthHowie View Post
    unless specifically told...I have always interpreted "24 lbs" as 23x25.3 lbs instead of 22x24.2 (i see this as 23 lbs when i string) or 24x26.4 (i see this as 25 lbs when i string).

    Although this is not exact i let my new clients know how i interpret their specified tension.
    chances are your 23x25,5 isnt the same as most other stringers' 23x25,5 anyways. Most important thing at this point is to offer consistency to your customers.

  4. #21
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    20
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by blableblibloblu View Post
    chances are your 23x25,5 isnt the same as most other stringers' 23x25,5 anyways. Most important thing at this point is to offer consistency to your customers.
    Agreed,

    Stringing BG65 (even BG80)at 24lbs...after a week or two it will drop to max 22,5lbs. This implies that 80% of the time you will play with tension much lower then the requested one.

    So get to know your clients and make some tiny variations until the feel is good for them.(best thing would be: don't tell them the tension so they are not biased by numbers, only the feel...but this can only be done with closer relatives) Then you must be able to reproduce the good feel over and over (keep sort of a "string-diary")

    e.g. I string at 13kg to end up with 11,5-12kg, tension loss is inevitable with thicker strings...
    That is why I prefer to say "I'll string it a little bit tighter to play 80% of the time with the desired tension".

  5. #22
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    40
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Just strung a new Yonex VT-70, it was 20.1cm wide (at the last visible tube in the middle).Using a Stringway where the recommendation is to string the cross at +0.5kg (~+1lbs).

    I did the mains at 10.5kg (~23lbs), after the mains, the body was 20.6cm wide.

    Strung the crosses at 11kg (~24lbs), and the body was 20.1cm wide again. So this works for me...

    If I should call this a 10.5kg or a 11kg job.... When people ask for 10.5 I do a 10.5/11. Most clients say it's feels harder than they are used to but that could also be the string, the constant pull, or the other stringer (or me

  6. #23
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I used to string 28,5-31 lbs (13-14 kg) for over 3 years. I read the pros and cons about 10% extra on crosses and thought that because of the friction and the fact that the cross strings actually tightens the mains a little, you should use +10 % on the crosses.
    Last time I heard someone saying, that the mains should be higher since they are longer than cross strings. So now I think that, since the cross strings actually tightens the mains, I use the same on crosses and mains.
    Furthermore, when stringing +10%, I see that my rackethead is just a little smaller compared to same amount of pounds.
    It all comes down to preference. I always used +10%. But since I last compared 28,5/31 with 30/30 I find the latter better in terms of feel. So now I always use the same for mains and crosses. Just try it out for yourself and go with the prefered method.

  7. #24
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    280
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcll99 View Post
    As a user of the racket (ie, as a client), is it better for me to have 23x25 instead of 24x24? or does it depend on the shape of the racket?

    I use Li Ning G Force Lite 3000 and BG-66UM..

    Attachment 141650
    I don't know if anyone noticed, but the first cross seems like it was placed incorrectly causing a "diagonal" cross.

  8. #25
    Regular Member ya4dang1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It is perfectly logically to add ~10% when stringing the crosses.

    The extra tension is neutralized by friction on the mains. Stringing the crosses at tension exactly as the mains will almost guarantee you the crosses have lower tension than the mains, which you may risk deformatting of the racket frame.

    Among the popular stringing methods, the Yonex's 2-piece method and the Victor's 1-piece method, state that you should add 2lbs/~10% to crosses, this extra 10% is referring to the "base tension (100%)" of mains.

    That being said, if client asks for 24lbs, you should string 24x26. Not 24x24, 23x25, 22x24 and any other combinations. I would say this is pretty standard.

    Everything has exception. The Gosen Haribito pattern does not require stringer to add extra lbs on crosses. But it is a more complicated stringing procedure, time consuming and economically inefficient.

  9. #26
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    280
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by ya4dang1 View Post
    It is perfectly logically to add ~10% when stringing the crosses.

    The extra tension is neutralized by friction on the mains. Stringing the crosses at tension exactly as the mains will almost guarantee you the crosses have lower tension than the mains, which you may risk deformatting of the racket frame.

    Among the popular stringing methods, the Yonex's 2-piece method and the Victor's 1-piece method, state that you should add 2lbs/~10% to crosses, this extra 10% is referring to the "base tension (100%)" of mains.

    That being said, if client asks for 24lbs, you should string 24x26. Not 24x24, 23x25, 22x24 and any other combinations. I would say this is pretty standard.

    Everything has exception. The Gosen Haribito pattern does not require stringer to add extra lbs on crosses. But it is a more complicated stringing procedure, time consuming and economically inefficient.

    I found the Gosen Haribito pattern to be quite easy and efficient in stringing. I found I could string a racquet just as fast with this pattern than a 2-piece bottom up pattern.

  10. #27
    Regular Member ya4dang1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    47
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    The Gosen Haribito method is more than the pattern itself.

    The aim is to maintain frame shape as much as possible, at the same time maximize the sweet spot and minimize tension loss. It may sound easy, but when you factor in different tensions, strings and rackets, the possibilities become practically infinite.

  11. #28
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I have an Arc11, it's a 3U and my max tension is 24lb (according to my racket). I realise most Yonex rackets can withstand tensions much higher than this.
    But is it safe to say, I can safely ask my stringer to string 24x26 without worrying about my racket deforming?

  12. #29
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    4,280
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iLondon View Post
    But is it safe to say, I can safely ask my stringer to string 24x26 without worrying about my racket deforming?
    Safe? With a competent stringer, absolutely - pros use them well past 30 lb.

    Actionably safe? Not really - if the racket breaks above 24, Yonex can legally wash their hands of it (as long as they can prove it was used above 24, that is).

  13. #30
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    1,267
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    It also depends on the condition of your racquet. Sometimes very fine cracks develop around grommet holes that may not always be visible.

  14. #31
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    came from the SAR
    Posts
    3,870
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    hi.

    just wondering, is there a 5U racket which I can safely have it strung at 23x25 lbs? thanks.

  15. #32
    Regular Member Mark A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    St Helens, UK
    Posts
    4,280
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcll99 View Post
    hi.

    just wondering, is there a 5U racket which I can safely have it strung at 23x25 lbs? thanks.
    I do one of my client's Arc FBs at 25/26, and that's two divisions lighter than 5U. The Arc 6 should be fine - I've never seen a racket fold at 25 that wasn't already broken.

    (If you need even more assurance, Mogensen plays his Arc FB at 34/36.)

  16. #33
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    211
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Try Apacs Feather Weight 300, Weight: 75-77g (6U), Max Tension: 35 lbs.

  17. #34
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    came from the SAR
    Posts
    3,870
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark A View Post
    I do one of my client's Arc FBs at 25/26, and that's two divisions lighter than 5U. The Arc 6 should be fine - I've never seen a racket fold at 25 that wasn't already broken.

    (If you need even more assurance, Mogensen plays his Arc FB at 34/36.)
    Thanks. Arc6 seems good. Better price than ArcFb.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •