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  1. #18
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    Deception is like beauty (and beauty is like deception!). They both exist in the eye of the beholder.

    Of course, we also need to talk about "deceptive shots" as a way to refer to inherent qualities of the shot itself -- effectively shorthand for, "this shot has good potential to deceive an opponent".

    The terminology isn't entirely satisfactory.


    The beginner (who doesn't know how to anticipate shots or how to read the opponent's racket head position and swing) and the advanced (who has more experience dealing and playing with deception) are not so susceptible.
    Precisely! Ironic how the beginner can end up doing better here than the intermediate player.

  2. #19
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    In my book, there are 3 types of deception: hold, double action, and same motion. They each deceive using different aspects of anticipation. The most commonly used ones are holding and same motion. Usually same motion will be used on overhead shots, whereas holding will be used for front and midcourt shots. Let me give you some examples:


    Same Motion/Preparation: Every overhead stroke should be used with similar preparation and racket head speed. The more similar these two things are, the more deceptive all of your overhead strokes will become.

    That means that a stop drop that actually stops the racket head will not be as deceptive as a stop drop that continues the racket head motion and slices across the shuttle. Also, fast drops should be played with the same racket head speed as a half smash, only altering the angle slightly.

    This type of deception disturbs your opponent's ability to anticipate your shot based on your hitting motion (i.e. reading your shot's direction and pace from your racket face, racket speed, body preparation). It does not disturb your opponent's ability to read the timing of your shot.

    You should be using similar preparation on all of your shots, but it is much harder to have the same racket head speed in the front/midcourt (lift vs netshot), although you can strive to keep your motions as short as possible to give your opponent less movement to read.



    Holding: Every front and midcourt shot should begin by showing a block or netshot (most commonly) or a lift or drive (less commonly). Then, you hold the shot and wait for your opponent to move towards the direction you show and hit the opposite.

    Examples of holding with soft shots in the front court would be the classic hold and flick where you show a netshot and then hit a flat lift to the rearcourt, cross court netshots would be holding a netshot and then crossing, and one of lee chong wei's favorites, showing a cross net and flicking straight to the rearcourt.

    Examples of holding fast shots would be showing a powerful midcourt drive and then cutting underneath the shuttle for a block (used in doubles), showing a netkill and just touching the shuttle for a netshot, and showing a high lift and hitting softly for a tight netshot (used rarely in singles). These deceptions involve drawing the racket back from the point of contact and slowing it down, which results in a less accurate shot, which is why they are used less often. Taufik likes to use this one from the midcourt where he shows a forehand push/drive and then flicks a fast lift crosscourt.

    The last type of holding is sort of a double action, in that it involves drawing back the racket to show a lift after holding a soft shot. The most common example of this one is showing a net shot, drawing back the racket in an obvious way and then hitting a netshot (the actual netshot does not have to be straight). Lin Dan likes to use this one a lot, especially as an inside out backhand return of serve.

    Holding results in disturbing your opponent's ability to read the timing of your shot, and the goal is to make them move before you have hit the shuttle allowing you to read their movement and hit in the other direction.



    Double Action: The last type of deception involves using multiple forward movements of the racket head in order to fool your opponent into moving at both the wrong time and the wrong direction. This is the most advanced type of deception and it is difficult to execute properly. However, if done correctly, it can lead to spectacular results.

    The most common example I can think of right now is Peter Gade's lift from the front/midcourt where he holds the shuttle, flicks his racket cross to show a cross net, and then actually flicks the shuttle into the rearcourt, hitting a flat lift. He can do this on both sides. I've also seen KKK do a double action from the midcourt that fakes a drive and then hits a block, but I've never seen it actually work... LYD also does a double action from the front court, where he fake flicks a straight drive on his backhand side and hits a flat cross lift. This one I have seen work a few times, but never as an outright winner.



    Bear in mind that unless your opponent is way below your skill level your deceptions will not work if you use them over and over again. You should usually mix hitting as fast and early as possible with holding in order to keep your opponent guessing. This way, you'll make him late for your normal fast shots and too early for your deceptive shots, allowing you to deceive him. If you constantly hold your shots, your opponent will eventually learn to not move and you will just be contacting the shuttle lower every time without any benefits.
    Last edited by Stratlover; 05-10-2013 at 03:35 PM.

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    and one of lee chong wei's favorites, showing a cross net and flicking straight to the rearcourt.
    forehand side chasing in after a smash? very common technique.

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    More like peter gade's double action lift without the double action and only a hold, like this at 17:07


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    Yeah, LCW likes doing that in the past year... but so far I don't see his opponents being deceived much.

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stratlover View Post
    More like peter gade's double action lift without the double action and only a hold, like this at 17:07
    pretty sure there is double action there having seen better footage of him play that shot elsewhere

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    He usually does it without double action and just a hold. You can see from the video that there is no forward action of the racket head until he hits the lift. The reason why it works on a lot of opponents is because he also likes to hit a cross drop from that low position which tends to make his opponents lean forward when he's holding his backhand down low. It usually doesn't work against LD and other top players but you can see it working there against Tian Houwei, making him take a late backhand clear and setting up the smash opportunity. If I were his coach though, I would tell him to hit both his cross drop and this deceptive lift higher in order to make it more threatening and effective, even if his opponent is able to read it. He tends to wait a little too long when doing his holds, as opposed to the chinese players who tend to do simpler, shorter deceptions that are less risky.

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    You can see from the video that there is no forward action of the racket head until he hits the lift
    no you can't - the video is no clear enough.

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    Funny I just watched this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WyrU9lXpEk today. Not that I agree with everything from the video though.

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    Here you can see Peter show it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKWigzcQoJQ

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    This has been a fantastically useful discussion for me, my understanding has taken a big leap forward. Thanks everybody!

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    This thread has renewed my interest in deception. Some of you had comments on taking the shot early, and some comments how LCW had taken his shot too low.

    You may want to check out this video clip:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HA1sOLxvQow

    At 3:00, Peter Gade explained, in clear English, how one trick shot works. That shot looks like the same one used by LCW deceiving Tian in Australian Open 2013. He emphasized that the shot should be taken as late and as low as possible to maximize deception.

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    He says hold as long as possible, not take as late/low as possible. He's saying the the first motion in a double-action shot should not be noticeably earlier than if you were going to play the first motion as a bona fide shot.
    Last edited by amleto; 05-11-2013 at 11:45 AM.

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    He says hold as long as possible, not take as late/low as possible. He's saying the the first motion in a double-action shot should not be noticeably earlier than if you were going to play the first motion as a bona fide shot.
    Can you please explain the fine difference between "hold as long as possible" vs. "taken as late and as low as possible"? The contact point apparently is lower, knee height. He also "seemed to say", don't take it close to net height, even though he arrived early and could do so.

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    You can hold the shuttle until the shuttle gets to where your racket hold is. You cannot hold the shuttle past this point.

    You can of course 'take' ie hit the shuttle at any time up to when it hits the floor.

    He also "seemed to say", don't take it close to net height, even though he arrived early and could do so.
    I didn't hear anything like that. When does he say/imply that?
    Last edited by amleto; 05-11-2013 at 12:37 PM.

  16. #33
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    Agree with amleto.

    Deceptive shots can only be done when the opponent has returned a poor shot that allows you to get to the shuttle early enough without footwork or time pressure.

    Only then do you have the time and luxury to address the shuttle early to show one direction and then a split second later to hit in another direction.

    However, for the deception to work, your opponent has to not only have time to read your first motion but also time to react to it. If your first action is too early or too short, he won`t be fooled. And for the second action to work, it has to be done not before, but immediately after you sense that he has reacted to the first motion.

    So, back to Gade`s advice, "hold as long as possible" is to allow enough time for the opponent to read and react to the first motion. And the moment you detect that he has reacted, that's when it is possible to perform the second motion. That is not the same as waiting to "take it as late and low as possible", which would mean taking it just millimetres off the ground?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by amleto View Post
    You can hold the shuttle until the shuttle gets to where your racket hold is. You cannot hold the shuttle past this point.

    You can of course 'take' ie hit the shuttle at any time up to when it hits the floor.


    I didn't hear anything like that. When does he say/imply that?
    Of course, that's my subjective interpretation of what he said for this very particular trick shot.

    At about 3:18, he explained if you hit the shuttle at the higher point, which based on his position he actually could take it there, it won't work; no one would believe you.

    So he chose a lower hitting position. And he did say "holding the shot as long as possible", and he didn't say exactly "taking it as low as possible". Nevertheless, he intentionally took the shot lower than he could. While he held the shot, that shot was losing altitude.

    I realize my interpretation is not precise. Can someone then explain, other than holding it for as long as possible, is there any significance in taking that shot lower rather than higher? I hope you can refer your answer to this particular trick shot in this particular video.

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