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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up is it worth it to hire a badminton coach?

    hello fellow badminton enthusiasts! what's your opinion on my question as stated on the subject? i've been playing badminton for exactly one year and i'm really addicted to it. i rarely miss our club's weekly games. ever since i started a year ago, i've made a lot of improvements. from a total beginner with 0 knowledge about badminton, i'm now able to play at least at par or sometimes beat those players who have been playing for years when i first started. i've watched countless badminton tutorial videos on youtube including all videos of lee jae bok and ZhaoJianHua & XiaoJie. i then try to practice them whenever i can during our badminton games. However, i know that I'm still doing a lot of things wrong. haha! i really want to refine my game to master at least the basics especially the footwork. my plan is to join in a group session first with my friends, obviously to save cost. after that, i'll go for a few sessions of 1 on 1 to further improve my game. this way, the coach can inform me even of my slightest mistakes. so back to my question, is it worth it? and do you agree with my plan? any input would be valuable.

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    by the way, i rewatch these videos once in a while and evaluate whether i'm able to implement them on my game. so far it's been effective. i'm able to improve my game slightly week by week. of course that's just me. i don't know what a badminton coach has to say. hehe.

  3. #3
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    If you are serious about improving, hire a coach. You will not succeed without one. If you are happy just enjoying the game, don't bother. You can still reach a reasonable standard through self learning, but you will never be an "elite" player (county standard +)

    Good luck

  4. #4
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    There are a few things about coaching to bear in mind:

    1) each coach and student have different teaching and learning styles. So a good coach for one student may not necessarily work for another.
    2) it takes a bit of time for the coach to work out what a student can or can't do in terms of physical limits.
    3) learning depends on the student's motivation. A well focused attitude during the lesson will get you further
    4) taking a notebook, scribbling some notes and looking back at them goes a long way. Even a smartphone video of racquet techniques would be very helpful.
    5) 1 on 1 is good, IMO 1 coach in 2 students gets you more. The student who has a rest can pick up shuttles whilst the other is training an vice versa. You then get more value for money out of the coach! (Apologies to the coach who would have to work harder!!)
    6) frequency is important. Once a week is OK, but difficult to groove a shot at that frequency. So having some weeks of two lessons per week will see a tremendous improvement.
    7) you don't see short term benefits, it can take a year or more. The worst part is trying to unlearn bad habits.
    8) set a specific target - that helps the coach adjust a level for you. Saying 'I want to improve' is too vague - the coach may think 5-10% improvement will satisfy you. Tell him 'I aim to win district tournaments/get to A grade' and he's going to take you seriously
    9) show the coach an intense learning attitude and he'll show you more

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    There are a few things about coaching to bear in mind:
    ...
    That is an excellent post.

  6. #6
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    Ain't you hooked now Your journey seems so similiar to mine.

    Here's my POV.

    Things ought to do before looking for a coach:

    Lose some weight if need to. Target BMI to be within healthy range. 18-23.
    Train up stamina. Run long distance and burst sprint.
    Build stronger arms, shoulder, fingers, abs, back, tighs and calf... bla bla... ie overall fitness and strength.
    Stay injury free.

    Once you are fit and strong, get a coach to help polish your skills and technique.
    Have seen coaches toying with the fitness of trainees.

    I always believe that one has to be fast to the correct spot in order to excute a good return. A good return would not put you in a difficult spot.

    My 2cts. Enjoy tour journey!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    That is an excellent post.
    Thank you

    Quote Originally Posted by Orangie View Post
    Ain't you hooked now Your journey seems so similar to mine.

    Here's my POV.

    Things ought to do before looking for a coach:

    Lose some weight if need to. Target BMI to be within healthy range. 18-23.
    Train up stamina. Run long distance and burst sprint.
    Build stronger arms, shoulder, fingers, abs, back, tighs and calf... bla bla... ie overall fitness and strength.
    Stay injury free.

    Once you are fit and strong, get a coach to help polish your skills and technique.
    Have seen coaches toying with the fitness of trainees.

    I always believe that one has to be fast to the correct spot in order to excute a good return. A good return would not put you in a difficult spot.

    My 2cts. Enjoy tour journey!
    Good points with the following

    - yes, it's true some coaches work on the fitness. I see it happen more in group classes rather than one to one.
    - you do not have to be fast all the time. Fast is good but other aspects such as rhythm, balance, controlling your centre of balance and knowing how to destroy your balance are equally important to maximising your efficiency of movement.


    For my personal opinion, although group classes are cheaper, you don't actually pick up much in terms of technique. You can find out what is correct but the second step of doing the correct technique yourself few people can master in a group class. Why? 1) Because it's difficult for the coach to give each person in the group enough individual attention to correct the technique, 2) the rate of feeding shots is much lower. e.g. a group class you may only get 30 attempts at a particular shot, one on one/two coaching gets you possibly double that number of attempts.

    Group classes does have some benefits - socialising, judging your progress against others in the group develop insight when you see other people's imperfect technique.





    Take learning a new language as an analogy - in a group class, you learn how to say words imperfectly, smaller classes, you learn how to say it better. With very small classes, you get to practice your speech much better with someone who is interacting with you.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    There are a few things about coaching to bear in mind:

    1) each coach and student have different teaching and learning styles. So a good coach for one student may not necessarily work for another.
    2) it takes a bit of time for the coach to work out what a student can or can't do in terms of physical limits.
    3) learning depends on the student's motivation. A well focused attitude during the lesson will get you further
    4) taking a notebook, scribbling some notes and looking back at them goes a long way. Even a smartphone video of racquet techniques would be very helpful.
    5) 1 on 1 is good, IMO 1 coach in 2 students gets you more. The student who has a rest can pick up shuttles whilst the other is training an vice versa. You then get more value for money out of the coach! (Apologies to the coach who would have to work harder!!)
    6) frequency is important. Once a week is OK, but difficult to groove a shot at that frequency. So having some weeks of two lessons per week will see a tremendous improvement.
    7) you don't see short term benefits, it can take a year or more. The worst part is trying to unlearn bad habits.
    8) set a specific target - that helps the coach adjust a level for you. Saying 'I want to improve' is too vague - the coach may think 5-10% improvement will satisfy you. Tell him 'I aim to win district tournaments/get to A grade' and he's going to take you seriously
    9) show the coach an intense learning attitude and he'll show you more
    thank you very much cheung! these are very valuable inputs. i'm very passionate about the sports and i really want to learn and excel. i'll make sure the coach knows that. hehe. i also think having a partner on the coaching session is best. we split the cost but the coach will still be able to give enough focus to each one of us. i will also have a training partner outside of the coaching sessions. i'll make sure to ask the coach for drills that the 2 of us can do. i'll also make sure to get a partner that is as passionate and determined as me. that way, we influence one another and we both excel.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orangie View Post
    Ain't you hooked now Your journey seems so similiar to mine.

    Here's my POV.

    Things ought to do before looking for a coach:

    Lose some weight if need to. Target BMI to be within healthy range. 18-23.
    Train up stamina. Run long distance and burst sprint.
    Build stronger arms, shoulder, fingers, abs, back, tighs and calf... bla bla... ie overall fitness and strength.
    Stay injury free.

    Once you are fit and strong, get a coach to help polish your skills and technique.
    Have seen coaches toying with the fitness of trainees.

    I always believe that one has to be fast to the correct spot in order to excute a good return. A good return would not put you in a difficult spot.

    My 2cts. Enjoy tour journey!
    thank you for pointing that out orangie. i really need to improve my physical fitness so i can make the most out of the coaching session. i cannot continue with the drills if i get tired easily. i think i'm slightly above my bmi so i need to lighten up big time. i'll do a lot of jogging and sprinting as well as weight training.

  10. #10
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    by the way, could you give me an idea on how much the cost is per hour for a 1 on 1 coaching? a range will do.

  11. #11
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    You are welcome.

    I had the experience of two different coaches in group classes - both very well known locally producing some excellent players. But I felt it was difficult to follow their technique - was it because of being in a group class? I followed another coach for one on two lessons for about a year and half. It gave me time to absorb and reflect technical details that I cannot get from the group class. But it was hard to start from the beginning again, to try and build stronger basic technique and footwork. Had to accept my game would get worse for a while in the process of building up.

    I also started off with singles training. You need to train proper basic footwork and balance for this so the coach has to be very clear on how to place the feet in different situations. The advantage is that if this is taught well, moving around to the shuttle is much easier in all situations.
    Last edited by Cheung; 07-01-2013 at 11:16 AM.

  12. #12
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    If the coach really knows his stuff and is able to explain it to you, then I'd say yes. *;-)*

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    ...... Fast is good but other aspects such as rhythm, balance, controlling your centre of balance and knowing how to destroy your balance are equally important to maximising your efficiency of movement....
    Can you expand on the destroy your balance and its application? Get ready to dive for slice smash ?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaincook View Post
    Can you expand on the destroy your balance and its application? Get ready to dive for slice smash ?
    http://http://www.badmintoncentral.c...-from-Han-Jian

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    醉拳!!。。。。。

    interesting..

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by reytave View Post
    hello fellow badminton enthusiasts! what's your opinion on my question as stated on the subject? i've been playing badminton for exactly one year and i'm really addicted to it. i rarely miss our club's weekly games. ever since i started a year ago, i've made a lot of improvements. from a total beginner with 0 knowledge about badminton, i'm now able to play at least at par or sometimes beat those players who have been playing for years when i first started. i've watched countless badminton tutorial videos on youtube including all videos of lee jae bok and ZhaoJianHua & XiaoJie. i then try to practice them whenever i can during our badminton games. However, i know that I'm still doing a lot of things wrong. haha! i really want to refine my game to master at least the basics especially the footwork. my plan is to join in a group session first with my friends, obviously to save cost. after that, i'll go for a few sessions of 1 on 1 to further improve my game. this way, the coach can inform me even of my slightest mistakes. so back to my question, is it worth it? and do you agree with my plan? any input would be valuable.
    whether coaching is worth the money is really personal, depending on how much you're willing to pay for coaching as well as how important it is for you to improve and your goals.

    i've trained a few months under a coach for college open tournaments mainly to get myself up to the level of my partner's. and since i got the basics down pretty good, i just train with a partner to improve on consistency. now that i don't participate in local tournaments, i don't feel that i need a coach even tho i want to improve.

    i do think, however, that some form of coaching is beneficial for you, as a beginner, so that you can get instructions on the basics and to execute them correctly, most importantly your footwork, and your stroke.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    i do think, however, that some form of coaching is beneficial for you, as a beginner, so that you can get instructions on the basics and to execute them correctly, most importantly your footwork, and your stroke.
    Can't agree more.

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