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  1. #18
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    If there's a good distance between you and your opponent, then it shouldn't be a fault if you attempt to block it. A good guideline would be the extent of your swing. It's good if you could block it w/o distracting your opponent while s/he's making a net shot.

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    The umpire in this case might invalidate point received by the blocker at fault, not necessarily "pre-emptive" call on the blocking fault while the rally is still on.

    Originally posted by quagmire
    also, isnt it better for the umpire to wait until the blocking racket hits the shuttle before calling a fault?

  3. #20
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Originally posted by cappy75
    If there's a good distance between you and your opponent, then it shouldn't be a fault if you attempt to block it. A good guideline would be the extent of your swing. It's good if you could block it w/o distracting your opponent while s/he's making a net shot.
    Yes, I thought I emphasized that an obstruction of this sort could only happen when the players are "AT CLOSE QUARTERS" (almost eyeball-to-eyeball, only separated by the net) and I further gave the example that even when both players are duelling at the net, if they are at opposite ends of the net, which means "a good distance apart", there is no danger of one obstructing the other.

  4. #21
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    holding the racquet high up...

    means you are ready to kill any shuttle that is a little high....



    this happens many times in doubles......

    the front player will always keep his racquet up so that if the opponents makes a mistake at netplay sending the shuttle higher than expected.... the front player can kill it directly because his racuqet is already up.....


    is getting ready to kill a foul?

    ... i haven't heard of anything like keeping your racquet up in front of the net is a foul..............

    i know racquet crossing the net before contacting with the shuttle is foul..... but.. keeping your racquet up is a foul- i haven't heard or seen any rules like this............


    i'm living in malaysia... where badminton is very popular.... and haven't come across such rules......

  5. #22
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    honestly, after all the explanations, im still not convinced blocking or waiting with your racket by the net is illegal. phil, i cant seem to find an entry about "balk" in the l.o.b.

    here are the points so far:

    we all agree that you can be called at fault if you hit the shuttle before it crosses your side of the net. however, this is covered in 13.3, not obstruction or distraction which is in 13.4.4 and 13.5.

    we probably all agree that a block is illegal if it prevented your opponent from finishing a follow through that crosses the net (i.e. resulted in a clash). this is covered in 13.4.4 as obstruction BUT you cant be faulted if the racket clash never happened.

    if i was blocking and the umpire called a fault because "i could" hit the shuttle before it crosses the net, i will strongly appeal the call to the ref bacause i was faulted for something i havent even done yet. i could just tap the shuttle quickly when it crosses my side of the net when blocking.

    blocking can only be done "at close quarters" otherwise, its just normal play. all my examples can be defined as close quarters meaning both players are inside the short service line facing each other with the net between them. net play is close quarters play. note also that i defined "good distance apart" as the distance covering a swing and not being on the opposite sides of the net.

    if the player however is in an irregular stance and standing with his/her face inches from the net without visible intention to make a swing, this could be an obvious call for distraction.

    a racket cannot be called for obstruction as long as it doesnt invade the opponents side of the court.

    cheung, i think that should be called a lucky shot rather than a fault.

    fhchiang's last post also supports my earlier posts on why blocking is legal.

  6. #23
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    As long as impact with birdie is on your side of the court, blocking should be fine. However, who's to say that contact point is at your side of the court when you block a high trajectory lobbing shot at the net? If you're tall enough and/or standing really close to the net, your impact point could have been made in your opponents' court.

    It's hard to determine contact point without an umpire's point of view at court-side. A tough call and really dependent on officials in tournaments to enforce, that's why it's a non-issue in recreational games but more closely scrutinised in officiated tournaments.

  7. #24
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    To save further needless circular discussion, perhaps people can define what is 'blocking'.

    I would say that it is holding a racquet in position before the other player has struck the shuttle. Therefore, standing further back in the court, your reactions and placement and movement of the racquet will not consitute a block.

    If you walk up to the net, hold the racquet in front of the net, then opponent strikes the shuttle, and it hits your racquet (with your racquet not having made an intentional movement), that is a fault. I have seen this called a fault in international tournaments despite the reservations expressed by Quagmire.

    fhchiang. The fact that people do not call a fault for this sort of action in M'sia does not mean it is not a fault!! In UK, many people will call mishits of the shuttle a fault, but that is not a fault. Like cappy said, it would need an umpire.

    Getting ready to kill is not a foul, so long as you move the racquet to the shuttle. Not by letting the shuttle bounce off the racquet.

  8. #25
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    [B][QUOTE]Originally posted by quagmire
    [B]for example you and your opponent are fighting it out on a net play. you hit a very close net shot and you know your opponent will only catch this below the net, is it illegal to have your racket head waiting above the net tape on your side before your oppenent strikes the shuttle as anticipation in case he returns with another net shot?

    Hi Quagmire

    As a followup, I emailed your above 'situation' to our SBA (Singapoare Badminton Association), which in turn, referred the case to an IBF Accredited Umpire, whose views are reproduced below for your information:

    "It is a fault (law 13.4.4 - obstructs an opponent i.e. prevents an opponent from making a legal stroke where the shuttle followed over the net."

    It is a rather brief statement, but, I appreciate and agree with him on the decision, although I'm no qualified umpire.

    Hope his views clarified some of your doubts.
    Last edited by Loh; 12-17-2003 at 10:20 PM.

  9. #26
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    thanks loh, of course i cant argue with an umpire. in that case tho, whens the proper time to raise your racket above the net tape on your side? im assuming i can do this once my opponent makes contact with the shuttle since the stroke is already finished. is that right?

  10. #27
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Originally posted by quagmire
    thanks loh, of course i cant argue with an umpire. in that case tho, whens the proper time to raise your racket above the net tape on your side? im assuming i can do this once my opponent makes contact with the shuttle since the stroke is already finished. is that right?
    Hi Quagmire

    As I understand it, Law 13.4.3, 13.4.4 and 13.5 emphasized on the words "obstruction" and "distraction". I think the author wants to ensure that there is 'fair play' and that 'sportsmanship' should prevail in a badminton game. Therefore, as far as possible the players should not engage in acts or postures that can hinder, threaten, distract or obstruct his opponent from returning as good a shot as he possibly can under normal circumstances. The benefit of the doubt should be given to an opponent to be able to return a good shot. Whether he can really produce a good return ultimately is not the immediate concern.

    So a player must understand these laws better and not be placed in a position whereby he is found to commit a fault, as in the case you described earlier.

    Actually, raising your racket above the tape or over your head is a natural thing to do for a player. A good player should never allow his racket to be held low pointing downwards as this is not a good ready position to make return shots or to anticipate them. In fact, when receiving a service, the player should raise his racket and stand as close to the net as possible to kill off any weak service. Yet in this posture, you are not obstructing the server (unless you are a giant) because there is a big gap or space between you and the server and, unlike playing net shots, you are not at close quarters with your opponent.

    The key is whether you are in a position which could obstruct the natural execution of a stroke by your opponent. If you are not, you can't be faulted. Even at the net, if both you and your opponent are standing quite some distance apart, e.g., at the opposite ends of the net, there is no danger of you obstructing him.

    As another poster has brought out an earlier case, you can definitely anticipate a weak lop or clear from your opponent by moving forward fast, say from midcourt to forecourt with your raised racket to block his shot. Once your opponent has executed his shot, you are free to do what you think best to win the point, but not at the risk of obstructing or distracting him before this.

    You can raise your racket anywhere in midcourt, in an area where there is no danger of causing any obstruction to your opponent. But when you are in the forecourt, very near to the net, just be careful not to raise your racket when your opponent is directly in front of you, for you may be faulted for obstruction, as in the case that was discussed.

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