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  1. #1
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    Default Holding the racket with short grip feels uncomfortable.

    Hey guys,

    So most of my threads are about grips haha. Hopefully you guys dont mind.

    I hold my racket with primarily my 3 fingers. The middle, ring, and pinky. The thumb and index are loose with little stress.

    It feels comfortable and i hope its right.

    Now, the grip feels great when I hold the racket long.

    But holding it in the middle, or even near/at the cone feels weird. I think its because Im not using my index and thumb?

    Not sure why it feels different.

    You should mostly use short grip in doubles right? For most shots? Defensive and offensive?

  2. #2
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    index finger and thumb are important especially for net and b/h drives. Use long grip whenever you have time and want to maximise power (or reach...).

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by giant_q_tip View Post
    You should mostly use short grip in doubles right? For most shots? Defensive and offensive?
    I disagree. You use a short grip when you need speed, rather than power or reach.
    Examples:
    - you are playing in the front court and you are looking to intercept the shuttle - you may use a shorter grip (short or medium is up to preference).
    - you are defending or crouch defending - you may use a shorter grip to manoeuvre your racket more quickly.

    However, when in the rearcourt, or the man playing in mixed doubles, you will often want a longer reach, to give more power and better reach for certain shots e.g. overhead attacking shots, drives in the tramlines etc.

    In singles you will rarely use a short grip (if ever) because you want the additional reach.

    So, saying doubles is mostly short grip is not true. You should use a short grip for those shots that benefit from a short grip e.g. net kills, front court intercepts, crouch defence, regular defence. You should use a long grip for those shots that benefit from a long grip e.g. overhead forehands, round the head forehands, blocks to the net, pushes, drives from rear/mid court.

    In order to get more comfortable, I suggest its not worth worrying about which grip you use and how you hold it. You should be holding the racket with all the fingers, with good grip tightening. The most important thing with grips is not long and short, but whether its regular/bevel/thumb/panhandle/other...

    Good luck!

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    As a matter of fact I remember someone told me that too many young players now use too much of short grips that it limits their power in their strokes. Or is it maybe that the game is too fast to keep on changing grips during the rallies?

    Nowadays I play a lot of doubles n TRY to switch grips whenever I am standing behind the imaginary 3/4 of the length of my court but don't always remember or not quick enough to do it.

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    Hi gaint , here is what i think and I hope it will help you. I think you can try to describe what you mean by "uncomfortable" , and is it uncomfortable all the time or it only happens at a certain time. Also, I am wondering if the grip size(not the length but the width) of your long and short grip are difference. If you feel that the racquet if not stable when you make a shot , then maybe you will have to re-learn a more comfortable way to hold the grip. But , I do think that you will need some time to adapt to new grip , and maybe you feel uncomfortable because you haven't get used to the feeling. I hope my comments help.
    Last edited by lucius; 08-01-2013 at 09:45 AM.

  6. #6
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    recently i tried to use the shorter grip style/lindan style without finishing the grip to the cone of the racket..well the racket feels "longer" while playing but what i can tell is the racket's maneuverability will be better meanings that u can produce a more stable shot compared to the style of holding grip at the cone ,imo u tend to mishit whenever u try to produce faster swing by just moving gripping higher near to the cone and usually u cant hit right at the sweet spot...i came across an advanced player in my country who happened to tell me that the reason they did the unfinished gripping is is because they wanted to train themselves to hit the sweet spot and the timing correctly so that they wont have to swing so hard just to make a clear (<<for e.g) it all depends to the player himself to decide which part of the grip they felt most comfortable with,some player tend to "feel" the racket by holding the middle part of the grip while some player are comfortable holding near to the butt! for me i am comfortable holding the middle part of the wooden grip,neither up to the cone or down to the butt cap,no matter it's smash or clear or whatsever,i wil only switch to the cone grip during serving. hope that helps! =)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I disagree. You use a short grip when you need speed, rather than power or reach.
    Examples:
    - you are playing in the front court and you are looking to intercept the shuttle - you may use a shorter grip (short or medium is up to preference).
    - you are defending or crouch defending - you may use a shorter grip to manoeuvre your racket more quickly.

    However, when in the rearcourt, or the man playing in mixed doubles, you will often want a longer reach, to give more power and better reach for certain shots e.g. overhead attacking shots, drives in the tramlines etc.

    In singles you will rarely use a short grip (if ever) because you want the additional reach.

    So, saying doubles is mostly short grip is not true. You should use a short grip for those shots that benefit from a short grip e.g. net kills, front court intercepts, crouch defence, regular defence. You should use a long grip for those shots that benefit from a long grip e.g. overhead forehands, round the head forehands, blocks to the net, pushes, drives from rear/mid court.

    In order to get more comfortable, I suggest its not worth worrying about which grip you use and how you hold it. You should be holding the racket with all the fingers, with good grip tightening. The most important thing with grips is not long and short, but whether its regular/bevel/thumb/panhandle/other...

    Good luck!
    good explanantion! thumbs up

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