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  1. #18
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    Maybe we need another thread - as to how various countries and cultures treat cheering. I realize most of my preconceived notions are based on British definition "proper behaviour". Perhaps, these need to be reexamined.

    I love watching Davis Cup (Tennis) matches from South America - they are hilarious with the antics from the crowd and players. Italy is also right up there.

    Personally, I keep my emotions to myself - I think it's harder to read a person. I like playing juniors, you can read them like a book - cagey vetrans - so hard to know what they're thinking.

  2. #19
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    i tend not to show off either my obvious joy or my frustration and focus on the opponent, but sometimes i can't contain it and just turn around and do what i have to do!
    i need to try to not get irked by the opponent's antics but when stupid fans cheer for him and gang up against me and try to 'seldge' me personally, i tend to get too aggressive and expressive myself. need to let my game do the talking!

    casein point: there's a couple tough opponents i face in the local circuit for the tournies here (mostly friendlies!) often, and this one particular guy is a very athletic, naturally gifted 14year old who's being properly coached by reputed coaches and medlaists at the senior-circuit in their age group (md40/45 i think) and it's us meeting in the finals usually, and obviously i can't recover fast, run around easily or unleash a storm of accurate shots all around the net as he can so i'm at the edge most of the time. he's gentle and we both can handle each other and stay cool, he more than i of course, but it's his 7 stupid cousins who i usually get to beat in previous rounds that cheer for him, more to mock me than to support him , that i tend to get ticked off by. one of my resolutions is to not give in to that this year.
    breeeeatheeee iiiiinnnn, breeeeatheeeee ooooutuuutttt.

    Quote Originally Posted by catman View Post
    juniors, you can read them like a book - cagey vetrans - so hard to know what they're thinking.
    lol, so so true @catman . those old timers sure know how to pull the nastiest tricks in the coolest way, letting you make yourself a fool out there in front of everyone

  3. #20
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    Lol...let me understand this a crowd cheering against you mostly made up of family members of your opponent - most of whom you've just defeated....lol....can you get a more biased crowd than that?
    I guess it's a great setting for training your mind - to block out that distraction and staying focused.
    Concentrating on your breathing is a good idea - but I must confess - if I faced that not sure how I will deal with it. Good luck

  4. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by drmchsraj View Post
    i tend not to show off either my obvious joy or my frustration and focus on the opponent, but sometimes i can't contain it and just turn around and do what i have to do!
    i need to try to not get irked by the opponent's antics but when stupid fans cheer for him and gang up against me and try to 'seldge' me personally, i tend to get too aggressive and expressive myself. need to let my game do the talking!

    casein point: there's a couple tough opponents i face in the local circuit for the tournies here (mostly friendlies!) often, and this one particular guy is a very athletic, naturally gifted 14year old who's being properly coached by reputed coaches and medlaists at the senior-circuit in their age group (md40/45 i think) and it's us meeting in the finals usually, and obviously i can't recover fast, run around easily or unleash a storm of accurate shots all around the net as he can so i'm at the edge most of the time. he's gentle and we both can handle each other and stay cool, he more than i of course, but it's his 7 stupid cousins who i usually get to beat in previous rounds that cheer for him, more to mock me than to support him , that i tend to get ticked off by. one of my resolutions is to not give in to that this year.
    breeeeatheeee iiiiinnnn, breeeeatheeeee ooooutuuutttt.

    lol, so so true @catman . those old timers sure know how to pull the nastiest tricks in the coolest way, letting you make yourself a fool out there in front of everyone

    7 stupid cousins! hahahaha, as soon as i read that i couldn't stop laughing. it's pathetic of them to do that since you've mopped the floor with all of them. but you do face a very tough mental situation here and only mental giants would be able to come thru without having spectators like that affect your performance.

  5. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyJT View Post
    Hello everyone
    This is more a "how would you react" than a question of rules.

    We had a club match last weekend.
    The last match in our club match was the Mixed Doubles which I played.
    The first set was 21-13 for us and nothing special happened.
    The second set was a real thriller. Our opponents had a lead at 13 - 16. And when we had made an (unforced)error, the teammates of our opponents began to clap hands. (This isn't a good sportsmanship for me and in our country).
    So they had the next lead at 17-20. At this point, I began to "cheer" and shout a "yes!" (to myself) after every point for us - even if it was an unforced error by them. While I said "yes" I didn't looked to the opponent - it was just for myself.
    At 23-All, the opponents man came to the net and shouted to me "Stop saying "yes" after every point and after an error of us!!!!! This is not fair!!!". I looked at him and didn't said any word. (Cause I know that their teammates behind them claps every time when we made an error).
    We won the match 26-24. The opponents woman didn't came to the net to shake hands and went directly to her teammates. I shaked hands with the opponents man and said sorry (for my cheering) and thanks for a good game.

    Maybe the cherring to myself was too loud - because I'm normally a player which plays really respectful and have a good behavior to my opponent.
    Sportsmanship is important for me.

    But at such a tight score, and the cheering teammates on errors of the opponent, I had to push myself.

    (I know you can't really compare this - but take a look at the big tournaments e.g. Denmark Open QF Mixed with the Danish pair in the third set 30-29. The whole stadium is cheering at every mistake from the opponents - including the Danish players)..


    So - how would you have react in my situation?
    Or how do you push yourself at such a tight score and the cheering teammates in the background?


    Thanks for your opinion.
    Normally, I attempt to appear unemotional, but bits of emotion do "leak" from time to time. It's never really a good thing to let one's opponent perceive one as an emotional player.

    When I play a good shot, I usually just stay silent. When I play a bad shot, I look the other direction and roll my eyes or say, under my breath, "come on", "get it up" or suchlike. When my opponent plays a great shot, one that I've been expecting to win, I occasionally give a clap with my hand and racquet face, but not too frequently, as I think that dilutes the meaning of that gesture.

    When my opponent plays a really, really poor shot, such as a total air shot on a sure winner, I try, again, to be unemotional. Sometimes, I say "lucky me" to anybody watching, which usually was just a few people waiting to get on court in high school badminton club/team. If it's really that funny... well I can always bury my face in the racquet bag and cough to conceal the laughter.

    "What are you doing with your head in the racquet bag?"

    "Nothing, just sniffing the shuttles."

    There was one time when animosities between my teammate and myself grew greater than between the two teams. He went so far as to clap for the opposing team's good shots and jeer mine. So after the match, my teammate refused to shake my hand, but both of us shook the other team's hands. It was an embarrassing moment for me, but I think not shaking the opposing team's hands is far worse than not shaking your partner's hand.

    Strangely enough, apparently most other people shout "come on" when they win. I only shout "come on" when I lose the point (after all, what's the point of "come on" if you just won?)

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by speedyJT View Post
    Yes that's a good point I forgot. At such of simple error, I didn't shout out a loud "yes". Just a "come on" as you said - to myself.
    And after every "yes" I raised my hand or my racket to apologize before the next serve.
    whats the difference of "yes" or "come on" in that situation??? It is exactly the same for me! Maybe a "yes" is even less bad because its simply honest (Yes-we scored an important point!) whereas a "come on"...why would i say come on to myself after service error of opponent?! makes no sense

    If I was your opponent, i would be more annoyed by constant apologizes than by shouts! Why do you apologize for something you do all the time anyway?! by purpose so to speak - makes no sense and would annoy me

  7. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by |_Footwork_| View Post
    I agree with Cheung.

    Imho, "in the face" only, when you play a really great point.
    never in opponents direction! i think this is very offending! no matter after what rallye!

    I think shouting is part of the game, if its a competetive game players should feel free to "enjoy" their emotions. but not in the direction of you opponent in my opinion

  8. #25
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    in general i think its a personal thing...nobody is the same..everybody has its own emotions and ways to express it...

    in a tight and important match i tend to shout things like "yes" or "come on"..but in a match with long exchanges it hurts me bad because i really suffer the oxygen loss from the shout! so i really keep the shouting to a minimum and rather take every millisecond to take deep breathes lol

    so usually im fistpumping to myself a lot then - halfway or completely turned away from the opponent



    it happened one single time in my badminton life that i experienced an opponent who i really thought was disrespectful and behaved very rude

    i did not shake hands with him
    its always seen as sore loser thing...but in my opinion shaking hands is a respectful gesture of thanking for the game
    if a player behaves like **** and i dont enjoy the game at all i think it is just honest to not shake hands!
    see it that way: if i shake hands (which i do 99,5% of the time) its an honest thank you! with worth and not because "i have to"
    Last edited by OhSearsTower; 10-20-2015 at 06:33 AM.

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