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    Default Have you played against opponents who really dominates the net?

    Like they can net kill, net drive, pretty much any thing shots in the front.

    What do you do in such situation or are you forced to playing a lifting/rear court game and taking the defense ?

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    I usually dominate the net, that's one of my strengths. So what should you do against me in singles? Play a lot of deep clears (as my offense is not that good...) and try to attack yourself.

    If you're opponent dominates you at the net AND in the back, well, you know the answer...;-)

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    for singles:
    if you already know your opponent is good in the net, do not drag your battle on the net.
    stick to the basic, tire and make your opponent out of position

    hit it to the back, then to the front (usually a drop). to the back (most likely a lift) and to the front
    rule of thumb: hit it to the back of your opponent backhand side, and hit it to the front the other way. for example: if your opp right handed, hit it to the back left of opponent, and then hit it to the front right of opponent.
    wait until your opponent make a mistake and smash.

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    Thanks guys, what about for doubles.

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    I would either play the shuttle away from him at the net, or lift to his backhand rearcourt when they are on defense so he is drawn outside his "domain".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdy View Post
    Like they can net kill, net drive, pretty much any thing shots in the front.

    What do you do in such situation or are you forced to playing a lifting/rear court game and taking the defense ?
    If they are good at the net, then you should employ a "neutral net shot" or "push" i.e. do not play the shuttle close to the net, play it firmer back into court. In this way, your opponent will not be able to take shots from close to the net, and should not be able to dominate in the same way. This goes for doubles (push) and singles (neutral net shot).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdy View Post
    Thanks guys, what about for doubles.
    there's no such thing as a clear in doubles!

    whoever dominates the net will win. (this is true for non-beginners, beginners/low-level games might be won by clearing...)

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    It is obvious that your opponent's skill is better than you, it is only natural that better player win.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdy View Post
    Thanks guys, what about for doubles.
    I am also more of a front/net player in doubles n u don't want to 'draw' me to the net (ie drops to my side of the court). Try to push or return to sidelines n mid-court if u can. U don't want to 'play' netting w/ me because my netshots are so close that the feathers often barely touch the net on going over to your side. He..he..he..

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    Quote Originally Posted by latecomer View Post
    It is obvious that your opponent's skill is better than you, it is only natural that better player win.
    Better at the net, not the back. They can't smash or clear well for whatever reasons but they have a partner who can. And the problem is if the strong net player plays the front and his/her partner plays the back, it's so difficult to move them out of position. (well at least for me to move them; I don't know how in such scenario><)

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    If they are good at the net, then you should employ a "neutral net shot" or "push" i.e. do not play the shuttle close to the net, play it firmer back into court. In this way, your opponent will not be able to take shots from close to the net, and should not be able to dominate in the same way. This goes for doubles (push) and singles (neutral net shot).
    Thanks! I will try pushing more (to get it past them, but when you say push am I pushing to the midcourt just enough where it gets past the strong net player but not far enough where his/her partner can attack?) . Where do I push it to?

    And can you tell me what a neutral net shot is? I don't know the different types yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sautom88 View Post
    I am also more of a front/net player in doubles n u don't want to 'draw' me to the net (ie drops to my side of the court). Try to push or return to sidelines n mid-court if u can. U don't want to 'play' netting w/ me because my netshots are so close that the feathers often barely touch the net on going over to your side. He..he..he..
    Thanks! Where should I push it to and is this for doubles?

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    You want to neutralize their strength - the net. Avoid attempting tight net, as so many already pointed out. If you are to block, block the shot deeper into the court is fine, as long as it is flat and faster - no floaters around the net.

    A neutral net shot is one that is not meant to create an advantage with tightness. The shot is flat, and if not intercept, would likely land on the service line. You're not gaining advantage, but neither can your net opponent. If you're to push, you can push to mid-court, or rear-court, as variations, and depend on strength/weakness of each of your opponents, as well as the gap they left between them.

    Also, you may add your own aggression at net. Practice and use net kill and brushes - don't let them play tight net either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdy View Post
    Thanks! I will try pushing more (to get it past them, but when you say push am I pushing to the midcourt just enough where it gets past the strong net player but not far enough where his/her partner can attack?) . Where do I push it to?

    And can you tell me what a neutral net shot is? I don't know the different types yet.
    You have options! A push in doubles could mean pushing to the midcourt (but softly) - this keeps the shuttle low, aim towards the tramlines (or hit it down the middle at your opponents partner if you are feeling very confident), and your goal is to ensure that the shot is not slow.

    The neutral net shot is typically played such that it lands on about the service line - it is like a very soft push. It travels low, and flat, but is not tight to the net in any way, but is still a net shot, because you played it to the forecourt.

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    My take on these kind of things is that you need to challenge your opponent. There are of course times when you have to back out of them, but you can't expect to win if you don't try to challenge. As soon as they start playing well at the net then the chances of you lifting is big which means they don't really have to worry about covering the net so much.

    Here's a tip. A mistake many do who play both singles and doubles is that they apply singles technique for doubles as well. If we are talking singles, a net shot is very often done from underneath. The results of this is that the shuttle goes upwards and then downwards. What you want to do at the net in doubles is not from underneath but that you play it flat downwards. In Japan, we call this 'short drive' where you gently push the shuttle forward so it goes flat over the net and then down straight away.
    Remember to use your body for preciser and more stable shots as well.
    By putting your body into good use and not just your arm, you can take shuttles much earlier than you would if you just used your arm. By standing still and waiting for the shuttle is pretty much a no-no in doubles. You have to meet the shuttle early. This is also one of those things that is different compared to singles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wingu View Post
    A mistake many do who play both singles and doubles is that they apply singles technique for doubles as well. If we are talking singles, a net shot is very often done from underneath. The results of this is that the shuttle goes upwards and then downwards. What you want to do at the net in doubles is not from underneath but that you play it flat downwards.
    Great point!

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    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    You want to neutralize their strength - the net. Avoid attempting tight net, as so many already pointed out. If you are to block, block the shot deeper into the court is fine, as long as it is flat and faster - no floaters around the net.

    A neutral net shot is one that is not meant to create an advantage with tightness. The shot is flat, and if not intercept, would likely land on the service line. You're not gaining advantage, but neither can your net opponent. If you're to push, you can push to mid-court, or rear-court, as variations, and depend on strength/weakness of each of your opponents, as well as the gap they left between them.

    Also, you may add your own aggression at net. Practice and use net kill and brushes - don't let them play tight net either.

    Thanks! I've tried the push and it worked wonderfully. They are usually caught off guard .. but later they caught on.. But nonethe less the advice helped put the opponents at the loss.

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