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  1. #18
    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipper1 View Post
    Am I correct in saying that if a return is being pushed and passing around my head or shoulders it is much better if I just leave to my partner as they are in a much better position.

    In relation to "awkward" pushes which will land in that mid-court area just beyond the front player. Should the server try intercept these and if so where is the ideal placement so as to be able to recover.
    Aim for the body of your opponent and stand your ground. Be ready to duck and move quickly. Generally you will force a lift or slow net short return. If you can successfully intercept then do so. If it puts unnecessary pressure on you then don't.

  2. #19
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    In the second part of my most recent post, yes.

  3. #20
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Yeah, those mid court sideline pushes are very tough to execute and return. That must mean the receiver is playing at an advanced level if he's doing that consistently. Even at pro levels, we can see it's very difficult to return these because it creates uncertainty and confusion for you and your partner as to who's getting it. And even if one of you gets it, it's a desperate shot that will be put away very quickly by the opponent.

    Imho, it's better to be proactive about your serve, as I mentioned earlier in the thread. Make sure they're low amd just over the net. And you must vary your aim a bit. I find serving directly at their face or racket shoulder helps cut down their anticipation, with variations of a few inches to the forehand or backhand depending on whether he prefers one or the other.

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