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  1. #18
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    As I wear glasses, my peripheral vision is almost non-existent, so I have to rely on experience too. It's a huge disadvantage but I can't wear contact lenses as they make me sleepy! lol
    Wearing glasses myself too, I find that the newer glasses frame designs have narrower and smaller lenses. So i play with the old ones that I have from 10-15 yrs ago... those are big and allow better all around vision.

  2. #19
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    I am glad to see this discussion, since I have terrible problems "seeing" the bird, especially in singles, mainly with opponents' overhead shots. This over a decade of playing
    Not even sure I can accurately describe the problem. Since most people say to watch the shuttle, try to do that. But invariably "loose" the bird; opponents pre-contact racquet motion distracts me from keeping eye on the bird. Other accomplished players say you dont really keep eye on the bird but the space where the racquet is going to make contact with the bird. Additionaly, never developed a well-timed split step which I notice all good players do. (The one time I did develop this I used to win easily, before I lost the split step too). So either I am moving too early or too late. Very vulnerable to relatively simple drop shots and smashes.
    I am not too slow for my age and it is not fitness since I rarely loose games due to tiredness. I "loose" it because I cant "see" the bird. This problem is not as much an issue in doubles, though it happens to an extent.
    How do you manage to keep seeing the bird to keep up long rallies and play percentage badminton instead of trying to finish it too early due to this fear of loosing the bird? Is there any off-court drills to fix this since I can't find a sparring partner?

  3. #20
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^ You need to play more video games...

  4. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by VegiSmash View Post
    How do you manage to keep seeing the bird to keep up long rallies and play percentage badminton instead of trying to finish it too early due to this fear of loosing the bird? Is there any off-court drills to fix this since I can't find a sparring partner?
    I recommend that you lower your ready position. Bend your knees and get down lower so that you are "looking up" at the shuttle. In this way, when the shuttle is hit, and it goes in a downwards direction, it will be coming "towards you", i.e. staying in your line of vision, rather than dropping out of your sight, as would happen if you stood upright too much. This is the reason you see professional players getting so low in defence - it gives a better view of the shuttle.

    Good luck!

    p.s. this is all to do with where the processing power associated with sight is focused. If you can keep the shuttle in the area with the most processing power, then you can react quicker.

  5. #22
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    Thanks, will try.
    But many in this thread seem to watch the opponent till the hit. Is that recommended over keeping eye on shuttle?

  6. #23
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    To add my own thoughts to the very good point that Mseeley (as always) makes:

    The human eye cannot actually "follow" the shuttle when it is hit hard- the shuttle travels faster than the eye can constantly track it. However, the human brain will compute the speed and trajectory of the bird in an instant, and the body then follows or reacts to the information. Coaches will advise you to "keep an eye" on the bird only so that you can connect with it cleanly and at the optimum point.

    The human brain can compute information that is not necessarily within the area of tight focus of the eye. It can compute peripheral and background information. It is important to trust your vision and everything that your vision delivers, not just what is in tight focus.

    What is important is for you to observe and assess the "shape" of the opponent at the instant or just prior to the instant he will hit the bird. Allow your body to sync to how the opponent moves or shapes up, and you will be able to instinctively time the split-step correctly. This means that more often than not, you will end up moving in the right direction, and with sufficient time to get to the bird at optimal height and position.

    IMO, observing and assessing the opponent's shape at the time of his play is critical to your reaction and success. I think doing this with most intermediate and recreational-level players is pretty easy. It only becomes difficult if you're up against A-level or national or pro players, who can shape up consistently and yet deliver more than one type of shot from every shape at the very last instant, i.e. send you the other way.

  7. #24
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    ^ Yes, watching your opponent's stroke preparation is useful if he's not advanced and deceptive... I know of a coach who I occasionally play with who (perhaps he's bored with our lowly level ) purposely and consistently uses an opposite stroke preparation! That is, a seemingly slow prep for a fast shot, and an intentionally fast prep for a slow shot... very annoying and difficult to play against...

  8. #25
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    it could be the badminton gym itself, having background colors similar to that of a shuttle. the gym that i play at painted their walls green so that it's easier for the players to see, a bit brighter green than the normal badminton floors from yonex.

    for eye glasses people, i would recommend sport goggles, since the lenses go all the way pass the corner of your eye without blockage. the goggles used for racketball or squash is the best i believe. swimming goggles might not be a good idea..lol.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by VegiSmash View Post
    I am glad to see this discussion, since I have terrible problems "seeing" the bird, especially in singles, mainly with opponents' overhead shots. This over a decade of playing
    Not even sure I can accurately describe the problem. Since most people say to watch the shuttle, try to do that. But invariably "loose" the bird; opponents pre-contact racquet motion distracts me from keeping eye on the bird. Other accomplished players say you dont really keep eye on the bird but the space where the racquet is going to make contact with the bird. Additionaly, never developed a well-timed split step which I notice all good players do. (The one time I did develop this I used to win easily, before I lost the split step too). So either I am moving too early or too late. Very vulnerable to relatively simple drop shots and smashes.
    I am not too slow for my age and it is not fitness since I rarely loose games due to tiredness. I "loose" it because I cant "see" the bird. This problem is not as much an issue in doubles, though it happens to an extent.
    How do you manage to keep seeing the bird to keep up long rallies and play percentage badminton instead of trying to finish it too early due to this fear of loosing the bird? Is there any off-court drills to fix this since I can't find a sparring partner?
    I was actually thinking it could be due to your the timing of your footwork, in a sense the timing you react with the shuttle could be early, hence you get tricked or late, then you'll struggle to get the shuttle.

    You could try that small bounce (can be found in youtube videos) to time your movement together with the opponents stroke.. Initially it'll be pretty hard, but once you're better at it, it'll help you move more efficiently! Additionally Mseeley brought up many good points too!

  10. #27
    Moderator cobalt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brilliant Gen View Post
    I was actually thinking it could be due to your the timing of your footwork, in a sense the timing you react with the shuttle could be early, hence you get tricked or late, then you'll struggle to get the shuttle.

    You could try that small bounce (can be found in youtube videos) to time your movement together with the opponents stroke.. Initially it'll be pretty hard, but once you're better at it, it'll help you move more efficiently! Additionally Mseeley brought up many good points too!
    isn't that the split-step?

  11. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobalt View Post
    isn't that the split-step?
    Yes that's absolutely correct!

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    As I wear glasses, my peripheral vision is almost non-existent, so I have to rely on experience too. It's a huge disadvantage but I can't wear contact lenses as they make me sleepy! lol
    Tsk, tsk, if Chen Hung Ling can do it, you can do it too

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