User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 17 of 20
  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Interception At The Net

    Are there any tips other than being ready with your racket up to help in intercepting low push returns from a short serve in doubles.
    I find in matches, that the receiver pushes my short serve passed me but I'm sure I should or could intercept these and hit them downwards.
    I don't really have time to step back further from the net while also covering a net shot so maybe me racket is too far in front to cut these shots out.
    Any help appreciated or any practice drills to help.

  2. Likes Birdy liked this post
  3. #2
    Regular Member Wingu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kyoto, Japan
    Posts
    317
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I'm guessing what you are talking about when you say 'push' is a drive shot.
    I think the natural answer would be to prepare your racket for the next shot as fast as you can (as you always should). In case of doubles, it is even more important as the pace is higher than singles. You'll want the racket up high and in front of you so you can take the shuttle as high and early as possible.

  4. Likes Birdy, catman liked this post
  5. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Very difficult and very few ppl do well with interception as front player.

    My coach would drive the shuttle from mid-court so fast at me and I would hit it back trying to kill it from front of service line. Because it is so fast, I can't even put my "muscle" into it to kill it (plus I am covering the whole width). Half an hour into the drill, my fingers and forearm completely surrendered (was only able to kill a few).

    Front court training, in my opinion, is much much harder to learn well than back court. Having a reflex that is good enough to interception the other front player's push, you are golden. Your national team needs you (no jokes).

  6. Likes Birdy liked this post
  7. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    australia
    Posts
    89
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Front Person Can intercept if you guess, / their slow. Generally you need to be very quick if you want to guess which way they go (left or right) because if you guess wrong on the interception, be ready to cover

  8. Likes Birdy liked this post
  9. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    surabaya, indonesia
    Posts
    500
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Other than putting up yr racket n be in a ready position one could 'anticipate' and be mentally ready to intercept whatever low shots that comes from the other side. EASILY said but not easily done.

  10. Likes Birdy liked this post
  11. #6
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    How good are your serves in the first place?

    Do you serve to specific areas to elicit certain returns from the opponent? That way you narrow the replies and start to anticipate where the service return is placed.

    When you have the racquet up after serving, do you raise it with the racquet at a 180 degrees angle to your forearm or slightly extended?

    The better your serve is, the easier it is to cutoff pushes. But it is difficult to cut off every push shot.

  12. Likes Birdy, cyberlettuce liked this post
  13. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    841
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    You may not be able to intercept all of them, but maybe some, esp. if your opponents have exploitable habits (e.g. always straight, or always cross-court). Some has the tendency of attacking serving side's backhand. In that case, you look for those shots. You may need to start having your racket moving, and your feet moving immediately after your serve.

    Remember, net area is your main responsibility, while you're trying to pick up added responsibility. Don't try to cover all possible pushes. If you do, you probably won't get anything. In order not to present a pattern, you can randomize your bias of which side you'd like to cut off (assuming your opponent has good variations).

  14. #8
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    8,591
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    84 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Cheung has a good point on where you intentionally aim your serve to proactively elicit a reply that you can anticipate.

    Another point is even though you can't cover the pushes, the fact that you show that you have your racket up and try hard to anticipate the reply will often cause the receiver to make mistakes as he will have less room to maneuver, both physically and mentally.

    All this while assuming your serves are pretty decent to begin with, of course.

  15. Likes Birdy liked this post
  16. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    50
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Whenever I try to intercept agressively at net, my side lose more points by confusing my partner at the back than the points gained by a net kill. So there should be a an optimal level in the recommeded agressivenes at the net.

    Could expereinced people please comment. Thank you.

  17. Likes Birdy liked this post
  18. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I suppose what I mean in my scenario is that if the push is good I would leave it for me partner but there are some push returns that might not be played so well. These type of pushes which I think I can hit downwards and do so aggressively, I am a fraction late to and possibly missing an opportunity.
    It could be that I'm just not seeing the shot quickly enough, off the racket, at impact. Are there any things I can do to improve this.
    I am pretty sure my racket is up in the ready position.
    Last edited by tipper1; 01-26-2014 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Addition

  19. Likes Birdy liked this post
  20. #11
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    8,591
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    84 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Split step

  21. Likes Birdy liked this post
  22. #12
    Regular Member diverdan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    England
    Posts
    477
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipper1 View Post
    I suppose what I mean in my scenario is that if the push is good I would leave it for me partner but there are some push returns that might not be played so well. These type of pushes which I think I can hit downwards and do so aggressively, I am a fraction late to and possibly missing an opportunity.
    It could be that I'm just not seeing the shot quickly enough, off the racket, at impact. Are there any things I can do to improve this.
    I am pretty sure my racket is up in the ready position.
    You don't have to win the point in this situation. Just get the shuttle going down to force a lift is good enough. If yoy are hell bent at killing everything within reach then working out your opposition go to returns quickly will aid you. Trick is not to move too much before they are striking the shuttle. Also learning to brush and slice is good.

  23. Likes Cheung liked this post
  24. #13
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Killing everything looks good but in practice quite difficult. Aggressive returns need only force or create a defensive position for the opponent. Therefore, having the racquet ready for a variety of returns will be very effective.

  25. Likes Birdy liked this post
  26. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Outside the box
    Posts
    12,511
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    In addition, try serving from 12 inches further back so you don't have to step backwards after serving.

    Also experiment with 'choking' up your grip. i.e. holding up higher on the grip.

  27. #15
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    41
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Am I correct in saying that if a return is being pushed and passing around my head or shoulders it is much better if I just leave to my partner as they are in a much better position.

    In relation to "awkward" pushes which will land in that mid-court area just beyond the front player. Should the server try intercept these and if so where is the ideal placement so as to be able to recover.

  28. Likes Birdy liked this post
  29. #16
    Moderator Oldhand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Asia
    Posts
    7,322
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    When I'm low-serving, my policy is to leave to my partner any fast return that my partner can see.
    In another sense, I intercept only those returns that are slow, coming straight at me or are within easy reach.

  30. #17
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    8,591
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    84 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    OP, are you referring to those pushes to the side midcourt?

  31. Likes Birdy liked this post
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •