User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Bruised

  1. #1
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Bruised

    Hi people of BC:

    I have recently (1 month) been holding my racquet pretty close to the cone. Im my beginner's opinion, it has improved my control and play in general.

    I must have played really hard and/or really wrong last night because I have a bruise lump some 1.5" from the wrist joint.

    Is this expected with my the switch to close-to-the-cone handling (and would pass with practice)? or the fruit of mishandling so I must adjust?

    Kokoy

  2. #2
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    AB, canada
    Posts
    721
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    where is the lump? on the palm or on top of the hand, etc.

  3. #3
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default where is the lump

    If the palm of you right hand is facing you, its on the opposite side of the thumb, below the point where our shirt cuffs would be.

    I hope that does not confuse.

  4. #4
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Posts
    3,511
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If your racquet pivot is at the cone... then you're probably hitting yourself with the butt of the handle. You sure it's bruises and not callus (layers of repaired skin from too much friction)? I try not to stick with the short grip while at the backcourt where one usual make fuller swing. It's good for the net player who needs more speed than power at the front. Holding at the butt of the handle gives one better leverage and harder shots, of course it's only in situations where reflex shots and shorter swing is not needed (ie. at the backcourt).

  5. #5
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    That is very keen crappy 75. Yes I have been hitting my lower arm with the butt of the racquet. It did give me a sense of control and to the contrary also power(???).
    Q: Is this normal to those who are trying this for first time?

    Your comments made me think, and your right again about being at the backcourt. I have been able to clear way to the other side with the grip but I observed I have lost the steepness of my smash back when my grip was closer to the racquet butt. My game has switched to clears, drops and some drives. The backhand is great (beginner's context-- he he ).

    You seem to have been in the game a long time crappy75, do people at your level "slide" your grip in the course of the game, depending on the return of the shuttle, position in the court?

    Thank you,

    kokoy

  6. #6
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Posts
    3,511
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hey Kokoy,

    I have only been playing for four years regularly. What I learnt came not from playing but from friends' guidance and tips in BC/BF/BR and other websites. Sliding on the handle does gives you more shot options, but it also requires high finger dexterity to use.

    I believe that Kwun's thread on 'finger power' introduced the concept to me, and I also recall some on the forum observed players like Sigit Budiarto change their grips frequently in their matches. I am sure that there are good players out there that play well enough w/o 'sliding on the handle', but I prefer it due to maximum efficiency on the shots I can take.

    However, it's definitely not a beginner's priority to learn it. One needs to be relax and calm enough to attain swift and precise control of one's fingers while 'sliding' in the midst of a game. You have to be really solid on the fundamentals to take advantage of it, otherwise it'll handicap you.

  7. #7
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Burnaby, BC, Canada
    Posts
    3,511
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Only if you use it all the time.

    Originally posted by KOKOY
    Q: Is this normal to those who are trying this for first time?

  8. #8
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Singapore Also Can
    Posts
    12,462
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hi Kokoy

    I hope your 'bruise' is healing. You must be hitting the bird quite hard to sustain that kind of injury which resulted from the handle butt hitting on your wrist. Yes your grip can give you better control but you lose some power unless your wrist is very strong .

    Your 'cone' grip is used more in doubles when many shots are placed around the midcourt area and this grip gives you greater control, speed and perhaps flexibility to return such shots. This grip is the favourite for the low service in doubles.

    Yes, there are many ways to hold the racket handle, ie, there are different grips. From the cone area you can certainly slide your hand down the base, which you ought to if you want to hit a longer and more powerful stroke as in clears and smashes. Through your action you are actually lengthening your 'arc' and this gives you more options. The 'cone' grip works better at the net where dexterity and feeling or touch are essential to executing a good net shot.

    Apart from sliding your hand up and down the handle (vertical movement), depending on circumstances and what sort of stroke you wish to make, you can also 'turn' the grip like a corkscrew, ie moving the handle either in a clockwise or anti-clockwise direction (horizontal movement). Therefore you should always hold your racket handle loosely, not tightly, but always under your control and only firm it when hitting or coming into contact with the bird. Practise turning the handle in your hands until you can feel every inche of the handle and know exactly where you are holding.

    Remember, there are many ways of holding the racket. The one you ultimatle choose should be the one that can help you to make the best shot and perhaps win a point.
    Last edited by Loh; 02-24-2004 at 05:42 AM.

  9. #9
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    1,920
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If you look at the grip on your racket it resembles the court!

    The further you are at the back of the court the nearer the pummel you hold the racket, the nearer the front court the nearer to the cone you should be holding your racket.

    I.e. If you are at the back you should be using a long grip and if you are at the front a short grip should be used.

  10. #10
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    16
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Cappy 75, Loh, Dill

    That's a load of info and instructions, thank you.

    I will try to be conscious about relaxing and verifying how my shots are made better/worse with changes in the way I grip. Try and learn I guess.

    Thank you!

    Kokoy

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •