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  1. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by reytave View Post
    so we have an upcoming tournament. my group assigned me to partner with this person. i'm no where near an advanced player but at least i can smash, do net kills, do deep clears and lifts, and defend smashes with some kind of consistency. However, my partner is really weak. he does a lot of high serves which puts us on defensive position right away. when the opponent makes a clear on my side, i can smash. however, when on his side, all he does is make another clear which is not even good enough so our opponents will just make steep smashes on us. When i'm serving, i give him a good serve so the opponent is forced to lift but all he does is make another clear which again is not even deep enough. When defending, it's either a miss, or an outside shot for him. When I'm smashing in the back and the opponent makes a weak return, all he does is push on the back or worse, make a lob. It's really frustrating for me coz I'm really giving my all during practices and i feel like everything goes to waste because of him. and once i get frustrated, i start to make mistakes as well and don't feel like wanting to play anymore. It seems just ok for him that we're always loosing but I want to win. Is there any kind of strategy that I can do so we would have a little bit of chance of winning some games? Maybe do like a mixed-double style of play wherein i take all the shots on the back court and hope that i can sustain the attack?
    Well, to be honest, there is nothing you can do. You are playing against 4 people not three. The final opponent is you actually. Just go in there and hope for the best. I am sure every doubles player goes through this phase.

  2. #19
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    I go through this exact thing on most times I play at the club.

    I'm an offensive player and I usually play my best with my usual partner who is offensive/all around.
    The problem is when I am paired with a defensive player.

    I like to drop/smash em and the defensive partner will just clear/clear/clear and try to win it by waiting for the other side to make an error and just soak it up by defending. In essence, we lose or barely win.

    This leads to the solution: sports psychology. Control your emotions and keep your mood up no matter what happens on the court. As long as you are playing at your best and making as little errors as possible and you've already explained strategy and your point of view to your partner, you've done all you can do. I even laugh a little on the inside when my partner screws up since I've done all i can do.

    When you have a chance, partner with those who play your style. There are so few players who understand basic rotation AND play good offense where I am... sad.

    Reytave, ask your coach to partner you with someone who matches your style. Then you two can build from that...

  3. #20
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    We just had our last practice for the tournament next week. As expected we lost most of our games. I can't help but feel disappointed and frustrated. When i serve, even though it's a very good serve and the opponent is forced to lift, my tendency is to go back to prepare for defence coz majority of the time he would make a clear. And when he actually makes a bit of a flatter shot, somewhat like a drive from the rear court, the opponent will just block the shot and drop it on our front court. When he's the one making the serve and the opponent lifts, i would smash with all my strength and when the opponent makes a loose return on the front court he'd just block it and so the shuttlecock will just travel flat instead of making a net kill or a smash on the front court. When we're side to side and the opponent lifts, i have to take the shuttle even though the lift is on his side of the court. I have no other choice but to run and take the shuttle low and attempt a forehand or backhand drop. I dont know what else to do.

  4. #21
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    We've all been there and done that.

  5. #22
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    Ask him if he wants to improve (as a pair) or try to talk tactics, you may be able to mold yourself a perfect partner. If he refuses then I have no advice as personally I switch off and drop them as soon as possible. If someone will talk/listen then I don't care how bad they are if they are willing and/or have potential.

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    If he's willing, it's possible to train him to play the game more aggressively. But if he doesn't, then I guess it doesn't help.

    When I just learned to play doubles, the coach specifically said no lifting and no clearing is allowed unless I don't have a choice. If he's willing to learn, perhaps the first thing to try is to limit his choice of shots.

    If he doesn't want to change, then I think it's better to change partner. There's a limit to defensive play.

  7. #24
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    best solution for this kind of situation is to mentally prepare to write off the tournament if forced to play with said partner, just get a better partner for the next one. the weakest link situation happens lots in community club nights, where the strongest is typically paired with weakest. unless the strongest is a whole lot better than the opponents, save the frustration, play the half court 'english' doubles, even if it means lifting more than usual, think of it as a drill. lose the game and try to avoid that partner again if possible.

  8. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    We've all been there and done that.
    so how's the experience? frustrating eh? hahaha!

    Ask him if he wants to improve (as a pair) or try to talk tactics, you may be able to mold yourself a perfect partner. If he refuses then I have no advice as personally I switch off and drop them as soon as possible. If someone will talk/listen then I don't care how bad they are if they are willing and/or have potential.
    He wants to i think. He also gets frustrated when he's not able to hit the shuttlecock. But that's it. As far as i know, he's been playing badminton way before i started playing and he's actually been training with some of the better members of our group. i'm relatively new to the group so i haven't seen him play a lot until now. i guess he's just a slow learner or he just doesn't have as much motivation as other members of the group. if he's really motivated, he would ask for advice personally or watch videos on the net. but we have to spoon-feed him the techniques/strategies to employ on the game. He doesn't even know the basic front and back/side to side position. Sometimes he would lift the shuttlecock and stay in front. And i'd be like a martyr scrambling for the shuttlecock when the opponent hits a smash on the sidelines. Or at times he would make a net shot then move back and again i would have to run in front like a pouncing tiger just to prevent the shuttlecock from hitting the floor. hahaha! And all of this is just for nothing coz he'll either miss the next shot or give the opponent easy to kill/smash shot. sorry for the ranting. hahaha! this is my only outlet for my frustration with him. But still i try to be as friendly as possible to him. I even gave him a banana together with a half-fake smile.

    If he's willing, it's possible to train him to play the game more aggressively. But if he doesn't, then I guess it doesn't help.

    When I just learned to play doubles, the coach specifically said no lifting and no clearing is allowed unless I don't have a choice. If he's willing to learn, perhaps the first thing to try is to limit his choice of shots.

    If he doesn't want to change, then I think it's better to change partner. There's a limit to defensive play.
    he's willing but not just enough will power to go the extra mile such as trying out the footwork on the sidelines when he's not playing.

    best solution for this kind of situation is to mentally prepare to write off the tournament if forced to play with said partner, just get a better partner for the next one. the weakest link situation happens lots in community club nights, where the strongest is typically paired with weakest. unless the strongest is a whole lot better than the opponents, save the frustration, play the half court 'english' doubles, even if it means lifting more than usual, think of it as a drill. lose the game and try to avoid that partner again if possible.
    it's really hard to avoid frustration as i'm a competitive person. i hate losing and it's the reason i've been striving for excellence. on my other group, i used to get beaten/taken advantage of by the other members especially those more seasoned players. but i took it as a challenge and motivation to improve. now i can play at par and even beat them with an average partner. Once in a while i can make plays that wows them or earn their 'good shot' comment. it just feels good man! haha! but i just can't see that same kind of fire/motivation in him. well the tournament is next week. as you said, i just gotta get over it and move on.

    now i gotta think of an alibi not to partner with him anymore as our organizer/group leader wants us to become mainstay partners. reason behind is so we'll get used to each others game. but i don't want to partner with him anymore. never ever unless he improves. any alibis in mind?
    Last edited by reytave; 03-02-2014 at 10:31 PM.

  9. #26
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    Alibi - no need. You sound like the perfect candidate to concentrate on singles......

  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    Alibi - no need. You sound like the perfect candidate to concentrate on singles......
    i find singles game boring based on watching singles game. i don't have the experience to back it up though. hehehe. and also i don't think i have the stamina for singles just yet. but my coach said it could be addictive once you get used to it. is it true?

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    For singles, you must have footwork patterns to cover the diagonal movement. Once you learn the footwork, it gets much easier. Practicing footwork routines trains your stamina at the same time.

    With better footwork, covering the court in doubles gets easier.

    As for experience, you get that when you play more. Singles has a lot of subtleties and tactical options.

    Is it boring?
    Definitely you can give it a go first for 4-6months. IMHO, people don't like to play singles because of not knowing the proper footwork patterns.
    Last edited by Cheung; 03-03-2014 at 12:23 AM.

  12. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by reytave View Post
    he's willing but not just enough will power to go the extra mile such as trying out the footwork on the sidelines when he's not playing.
    Perhaps too much failures discourage him. Start with one or two items to improve on at a time. Once he improves, he will get his motivation back and will take more initiative.

    I was feeling down for a few months for the same reason and took time off playing and concentrated on training only. I became better after the time off, have more confidence and played better.

    If the others are willing, you could organize a doubles training session every week. For example, the first week you limit his choice of shots, the second week go into attack/defense mode, third week into rotation, etc.

    That's what my coach did to us and I find that on a recreational level, it improved our games.

  13. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    For singles, you must have footwork patterns to cover the diagonal movement. Once you learn the footwork, it gets much easier. Practicing footwork routines trains your stamina at the same time.

    With better footwork, covering the court in doubles gets easier.

    As for experience, you get that when you play more. Singles has a lot of subtleties and tactical options.

    Is it boring?
    Definitely you can give it a go first for 4-6months. IMHO, people don't like to play singles because of not knowing the proper footwork patterns.
    i'd say i have a respectable grasp of moving diagonally as well as front and back. my problem is really more on the stamina part. once i get tired and my legs feel kind of numb, my tendency is to stop and catch my breath after taking a shot while waiting for the next shot instead of moving to the center immediately. in effect, i take the next shot late and i'm already out of position. hahaha! but i'll definitely give it a try once i feel more confident. someday... someday...

  14. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by alien9113 View Post
    Perhaps too much failures discourage him. Start with one or two items to improve on at a time. Once he improves, he will get his motivation back and will take more initiative.

    I was feeling down for a few months for the same reason and took time off playing and concentrated on training only. I became better after the time off, have more confidence and played better.

    If the others are willing, you could organize a doubles training session every week. For example, the first week you limit his choice of shots, the second week go into attack/defense mode, third week into rotation, etc.

    That's what my coach did to us and I find that on a recreational level, it improved our games.
    the thing is he needs to have the initiative to make ways for him to learn and improve. it shouldn't be us taking the initiative to teach him. when i was at his level, i had a conscious effort to improve. i would practice footwork, hitting action, switching grips, etc. even just on my bedroom. i watch a lot of video tutorials and read lots and lots of badminton stuff. that's also the reason why i got into this forum. whenever i played, i put an effort into implementing the things that i practice. Despite losing on the short run, in the long run, it brought more victories and more satisfaction for me. Recently i just moved to the next level and asked for coaching sessions. Again, i hear praises from my group on the improvements. This motivates me more to excel and go on the next level. I just don't see this kind of motivation with him. He wants to win, well i guess everybody does, but he doesn't have the motivation to practice. We tell him to do this and that. He'll say 'ok' but won't even practice doing it. He's already happy with winning 1 game out of 10. And this is against a weak opponent. hahaha! Yeah I know I'm bashing my partner. Can't help but let the steam off. Human nature. hahaha!

  15. #32
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    You're not married to your partner, you know...

  16. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    You're not married to your partner, you know...
    that's how passionate i am with the sport. i am only a recreational player but i want to be with the ones on top. wahhhh! this is addiction already. i think i need a rehab. hahaha!

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    Quote Originally Posted by reytave View Post
    the thing is he needs to have the initiative to make ways for him to learn and improve. it shouldn't be us taking the initiative to teach him. when i was at his level, i had a conscious effort to improve. i would practice footwork, hitting action, switching grips, etc. even just on my bedroom. i watch a lot of video tutorials and read lots and lots of badminton stuff. that's also the reason why i got into this forum. whenever i played, i put an effort into implementing the things that i practice. Despite losing on the short run, in the long run, it brought more victories and more satisfaction for me. Recently i just moved to the next level and asked for coaching sessions. Again, i hear praises from my group on the improvements. This motivates me more to excel and go on the next level. I just don't see this kind of motivation with him. He wants to win, well i guess everybody does, but he doesn't have the motivation to practice. We tell him to do this and that. He'll say 'ok' but won't even practice doing it. He's already happy with winning 1 game out of 10. And this is against a weak opponent. hahaha! Yeah I know I'm bashing my partner. Can't help but let the steam off. Human nature. hahaha!
    It depends on the person's character I think. Maybe he's not so comfortable to ask people to train him, so you ask him along instead. After a few sessions, maybe he will warm up to it and take more initiative.

    If it really fails, then I think you can let it be. Maybe he's just not really into badminton as seriously as some of us here. You have already done your best.

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