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    Default Trouble in getting used to a new racket

    I recently purchased a Yonex ArcSaber I-Slash racket, but am struggling with it. It seemed like a good racket for my style (not a big hitter, but a tactical control player) from the spec and reviews. However, I am hitting a lot on the frame, missed lots of shots and felt the lack of power in pushing the shuttlecock deep into the back court of my opponents. I really struggled to play with it better than my old Carbonex 150. I strung it at 23lb with BG65Ti.

    I am wondering if it is that I just need to take more time to get used to it, or I should declare it a wrong racket for me. Also, will I feel better with it strung at a different tension? I am an upper intermediate player who can hit pretty much at the sweet spot with my old racket.

    Could those of you who had more experience please offer a few tips on what to expect of a new racket and how to make the best of it?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    Joshua

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    best way to adjust to a racket is to hit clears and really simple drops, no slice or deception, so that u can get a feel for the rackets flex and swing.

    i have a kason and a victor mx80 which are different specs wise, but i know from experience how each feels and how a clear through my MX80 needs to be hit differently for my kason.

    just take the time to rally and practice the basic shots. its no the racket so much as you learning how the racket plays. goodluck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by joshzhao85 View Post
    I recently purchased a Yonex ArcSaber I-Slash racket, but am struggling with it. It seemed like a good racket for my style (not a big hitter, but a tactical control player) from the spec and reviews. However, I am hitting a lot on the frame, missed lots of shots and felt the lack of power in pushing the shuttlecock deep into the back court of my opponents. I really struggled to play with it better than my old Carbonex 150. I strung it at 23lb with BG65Ti.

    I am wondering if it is that I just need to take more time to get used to it, or I should declare it a wrong racket for me. Also, will I feel better with it strung at a different tension? I am an upper intermediate player who can hit pretty much at the sweet spot with my old racket.

    Could those of you who had more experience please offer a few tips on what to expect of a new racket and how to make the best of it?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    Joshua
    The I slash makes you swing a little faster so I think you might be having timing issues. Also the frame is smaller then usual racquets.

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    You need to relax and give yourself some more time. Sometimes a change in technique helps, assuming you have some foundation.

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    It's reassuring that the problem is likely not with the racket, but that I need to adapt. You are spot on that I was attempting slices and other trick shots that I used to play. Does this mean that this racket may not be the most suitable for my style? Or, it's just harder to master. But when I do, it may enable me to do even better?

    This is my second racket. I wonder if all new rackets need to go through such a phase of adaption. Or, I should really pick a racket that I feel more comfortable to begin with. The challenge here is that I will have to select from rackets that I can lay my hand on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Exert View Post
    The I slash makes you swing a little faster so I think you might be having timing issues. Also the frame is smaller then usual racquets.
    Just to clarify, so my swing may be a tad too slow right now?

    Yes, I noticed that the frame is smaller. The strings usually break right at the sweet spot, so I thought that I should be able to handle a smaller frame. Looks that I overestimated myself :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by atypical View Post
    You need to relax and give yourself some more time. Sometimes a change in technique helps, assuming you have some foundation.
    Great tips! I'll try to do differently. Could you elaborate on a few techniques that may be candidates for change? I already felt that I need to use my wrist more. I think that the string tension of my racket was set to be lower. Maybe my technique is not good enough to handle high tension just yet?

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    Quote Originally Posted by joshzhao85 View Post
    Just to clarify, so my swing may be a tad too slow right now?

    Yes, I noticed that the frame is smaller. The strings usually break right at the sweet spot, so I thought that I should be able to handle a smaller frame. Looks that I overestimated myself :-)
    Try to get your timing right, it's makes you swing faster not slower. It's a decent all around racquet I did pretty well with it but it was too flexy since I'm used to extra stiff racquets. Try to get timing on point so consistently try to hit the sweet spot.

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    ARC-IS: slim shaft, medium flex (Yonex medium is indeed very flexible imo), compact head.

    These three features ime spell timing issues. One has to adjust to the smaller frame head n at the same time to the flexy shaft. On top of that, the slim shaft adds to the flexiness. For a player with strong wrist, this racket will b like a whip, no doubt.

    Adjust ur timing accordingly. Try slower swing speed. That may help. If that doesn't after a few sessions, then maybe it just doesn't suit u. Time for a change then.

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    The worst thing to do when you have a new weapon (with different specs) is to jump into a serious game and try to play the same way as you play with your old racket.

    Better to use the new racket for warm-up clears, flat drives, drops and smashes. Then use your regular racket for games. That way you will be conscious about the difference in feel as well get used to playing with either rackets equally well.

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    Hi Guys,

    I am happy to report that I am getting better at using the racket. I am very comfortable with upper hand clears now. I still need to work on lower hand clears, as I still have some timing issues from time to time. When I am hitting on the sweet spot, it was pretty crisp. This is pretty good, though there might be better rackets for me. I will try a lighter racket in the future for doubles :-)

    Thank you all for kind help! I really appreciate all your advices and encouragements.

    Happy playing!

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    find a partner, (you can even have a half court session), have him feed you a set of 10-20 strokes of the same kind... move to a different stroke. that way you can get used to it faster than during an actual game, AND you will have time to analyze what's lacking and what else you can try or whether you're putting too much force into your swings or relying on your arm more and wrist less etc. you may also have to control your speed of approach/timing etc, in addition to what the others have suggested.
    as is, the AS-IS is not a bad racket at all! its pretty decent, one of the national level players (md45 category) at the local club plays with it and i've tried it..it's a beauty.

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    Quote Originally Posted by joshzhao85 View Post
    I recently purchased a Yonex ArcSaber I-Slash racket, but am struggling with it. It seemed like a good racket for my style (not a big hitter, but a tactical control player) from the spec and reviews. However, I am hitting a lot on the frame, missed lots of shots and felt the lack of power in pushing the shuttlecock deep into the back court of my opponents. I really struggled to play with it better than my old Carbonex 150. I strung it at 23lb with BG65Ti.

    I am wondering if it is that I just need to take more time to get used to it, or I should declare it a wrong racket for me. Also, will I feel better with it strung at a different tension? I am an upper intermediate player who can hit pretty much at the sweet spot with my old racket.

    Could those of you who had more experience please offer a few tips on what to expect of a new racket and how to make the best of it?

    Thanks a lot in advance!

    Joshua

    if you are one of those who switch rackets constantly, then you would know how quickly you can adapt to the different specs of rackets. if this is your first time, give yourself an expectation of up to 3 months of consistant playing before seeing improvements, just so that you're not too disappointed too quickly and give up on your new racket.

    it also depends on how often you play, if you play once a month, then you'll need more time to adjust, if you play 3-4 times a week like me, you might be able to adjust your muscles to adapt to the racket in a month or so.


    with a fairly flexible shaft, strung at 23lbs, you should be able to hit from baseline to baseline pretty easily. but please remember that you might need to change your technique a bit reguarding the way you swing when your characteristics of your racket changes as well. i've never own a cab150 so i don't know how it hits so i can help you in how to change the way to hit to get more out of your new racket.

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    Thanks for suggesting these ways to practice! I can hit baseline to baseline pretty easily with crispiness feel, so I think it should be a decent racket. It is those hasty defensive plays I am still having some trouble with, mostly timing issues and weak repulsion power. I wonder if I should string it at tension lower than 23lb.

    My friends like game plays. I will need to entice someone with some treats to get them to feed me practice shots

    Quote Originally Posted by drmchsraj View Post
    find a partner, (you can even have a half court session), have him feed you a set of 10-20 strokes of the same kind... move to a different stroke. that way you can get used to it faster than during an actual game, AND you will have time to analyze what's lacking and what else you can try or whether you're putting too much force into your swings or relying on your arm more and wrist less etc. you may also have to control your speed of approach/timing etc, in addition to what the others have suggested.
    as is, the AS-IS is not a bad racket at all! its pretty decent, one of the national level players (md45 category) at the local club plays with it and i've tried it..it's a beauty.

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    Yeah, it is my first time switching rackets. I am playing 3 times a week these days, so I hope to play with it better in another month or so. My previous racket from some 15 years ago should be inferior in technology, but I actually played better :-(

    I find that I have less timing issues in single games when I have more time to prepare for a shot. It was giving me more trouble in doubles. Perhaps I should get a lighter racket with better repulsion for double games. Time to put it on my birthday wish list :-)

    Quote Originally Posted by gundamzaku View Post
    if you are one of those who switch rackets constantly, then you would know how quickly you can adapt to the different specs of rackets. if this is your first time, give yourself an expectation of up to 3 months of consistant playing before seeing improvements, just so that you're not too disappointed too quickly and give up on your new racket.

    it also depends on how often you play, if you play once a month, then you'll need more time to adjust, if you play 3-4 times a week like me, you might be able to adjust your muscles to adapt to the racket in a month or so.


    with a fairly flexible shaft, strung at 23lbs, you should be able to hit from baseline to baseline pretty easily. but please remember that you might need to change your technique a bit reguarding the way you swing when your characteristics of your racket changes as well. i've never own a cab150 so i don't know how it hits so i can help you in how to change the way to hit to get more out of your new racket.

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    You need to relax and give yourself some more time. Sometimes a change in technique helps, assuming you have some foundation.

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