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  1. #1
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    Default Awl or hook - safe technique to thread through a shared hole

    Hi there, I just need some advice regarding what is the best or worst method to thread through a shared hole. I know Kwun has demonstrated all techniques over a youtube clip ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0VlOigXEgY ). From looking at this video clip its bit obvious that its best to use a pair of pliers, rather than a awl or a hook. My main question is, under high tension (e.g. 30+lbs) would it be safer to use an a awl or a hook?

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    My pliers have serrated teeth, I learned the hard way not up use them except to push the string through.

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    From personal experience I feel the hook is better for lower tensions as lower tensions mean that you can actually move the string around more. At higher tensions I almost exclusively use an awl to get a string through shared holes simply because I feel putting more pressure on high tension strings is not the best of ideas.

    Obviously I haven't taken the time to do some scientific research but in my mind it stands to reason that when you're string 30+lbs, it would be illogical to pull more tension on one singular point. Thus, I would believe that using a awl is the safer of the two options.

    However,at lower tensions like 20-24lbs, I like to use a hook to quickly move a string, and I adding a little more tension when it's that low tension will not damage the string or frame. Therefore, efficiency comes without the risk of damaging string or frame.

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    If you use an awl with high tensions, BE VERY CAREFUL, if it is too pointy/sharp you run the risk of snapping your string if it's really blocking the grommet. 95% of the time i can pass easily with pliers and a sharp string tip cut with high quality cutters, or string mover as a 2nd option.

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    I used to use an awl and it was a pain to get them through. Once i used the hook I never went back

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    I still cannot get the hook method. So in which direction should I pull the string?

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    i have a more detailed video on how to deal with shared holes:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=adD08zJTW1Q

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    0ozafo0, i thought similar to your description. I also think using a hook under high tension could be risky, as you are applying more pounds of tension when you are pulling it with the hook. it feels awl maybe a safer option under high tension

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    my awl feels fairly sharp so I'm scared of nicking the string. I have managed ok (for all 3 of my string jobs...) by using angle of attack, pliers, and pushing tensioned string up/down.

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    The string mover is definitely safer. I've never heard of a broken string from using it because tension was too high, and you probably shouldn't string over 30lbs anyways.

    But I'd be curious to know if it ever happened.

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    Never use an awl or a hook (anymore). Always cut the string in a tip, look through the hole to see in which direction I should put it in (Kwun's angle of attack), and then use pliers to push it through (if the string knicks, I cut it again). I have 100% success rate using these methods on 80+ jobs.

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    Just strung a racket at 35lbs and it seem to be alot easier to push it with the pliers. Infact i found stringing at lower tension (around 23lbs) to be bit more of a pain. Thats when i have used an awl or a hook

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    these days i use the awl instead of the string mover.

    my awl is the Gamma one and has a very thin tip and shaft. it is perfect for badminton as it easily finds the gap between the string and grommet (by pointing it down) and i have never even once damage a string.

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    Anywhere we can buy the Gamma awl online?

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    Quote Originally Posted by llpjlau View Post
    Anywhere we can buy the Gamma awl online?
    http://www.amazon.com/Gamma-Straight-Awl/dp/B0002TQ1R0

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    these days i use the awl instead of the string mover.

    my awl is the Gamma one and has a very thin tip and shaft. it is perfect for badminton as it easily finds the gap between the string and grommet (by pointing it down) and i have never even once damage a string.
    I find it kind of ironic I have never needed an awl anymore after reading your suggestions and seeing your videos, whereas you're still using them

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    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvdzwaan View Post
    I find it kind of ironic I have never needed an awl anymore after reading your suggestions and seeing your videos, whereas you're still using them
    it is a matter of patience. (or lack of ) i know a stringer who (used to) do the same as you. never use any tool other than the pliers. so it is possible to thread through any shared holes without an awl or string mover. my first attack is still the pliers as well as nudging the string by finger.

    however, i usually can tell whether that hole is a stubborn one or not and i will resort to the awl if so. esp for rackets with fresher grommets, i just don't have much patience anymore.

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