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    Lightbulb Good in single but suck in doubles

    I need some feedback on doubles technique. I'm a good single player in my club but I suck at doubles. Somehow I never figure it out what went wrong with my play. For example last week I got beaten by a mix double and my partner was a strong male single player.

    What ability that doubles player have that a single player doesn't have. Somehow in double I found that the game is very quick and confusing and a strong clear and drop shots doesn't have the same killer impact as single.

    After I play double, sometimes I feel that I won single game because my stamina and footwork not because my skill.

    I'm interested to hear other people which have a similar problem like me.

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    As you found out, singles is all about you and it is easier to find gaps because of the large area one must cover. Plus, it really also is about patience, shot selection, and footwork.

    In doubles, it's more teamwork, and less about patience, and footwork. Gaps are shrunk to a smaller opening that can close in a second. Working together with your partner to set up what you want returned from the opponents. Both of you being in the correct positions AND knowing which shots belong to who are very important. The time to react and prepare for the return is shorter than singles.

    It's hard to talk while on the court so it's best to talk about scenarios off the court to clarify the problem(s) faced on the court. Talk about what you or your partner wants to do and what the other should be doing/expecting, where to return a particular shot, who to force to the rear and who to keep in the front, etc.
    Last edited by mater; 08-04-2014 at 09:39 AM.

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    Singles is all about creating movement pressure. Doubles is about creating time pressure. Your positioning as a team is vital to ensure that i) you can start to apply pressure and ii) you minimise opportunity for your opponent to switch the tables!

    This basically means it's vital to know when to contest/take the net and get into attacking formation, and also the best way to maintain the attack. In singles cross-court shots are common place as one seeks out the space. However, in doubles the straight and channel attack should be the staple diet. This gives maximum chance to get the net player involved and also minimises chance of counter attack as the defending team has little angle to work with.

    Analyse your movement, positioning and rotation as well as that of your opponents. You may find the female sticks too much to the T or net are in general and this will open up a lot of the court for you to attack.

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    Singles: move your opponent around
    Doubles: pressure your opponent so they always have to defend.

    They are a different thing and and like Amleto said, many shots which are winning shots in singles are bad shots in doubles and vice verca.

    For example:
    Singles: if you lift, or clear, clear to the middle
    Doubles, if you lift or clear, clear to the corners.
    Singles: Cross court Smashes or smashes to the wide areas are the best
    Doubles: Smashes to the middle are the best choice most of the times.


    but for starters:
    0. Make your grip shorter. Doubles are faster.
    1. You must make your shot low and descending, use lift and clears only when you cannot make your shots descending.
    2. in Defence: Side by side, this is if you lift\clear the ball.
    3. At Attack: Front-Back, this is if the opponent lift\clear the ball or their return ball is high.

    others:
    4. Split responsibilities. when defending, just defend your side, for the Middle, decide who will take the shuttle (or is more at the front) so there are no racket clashes.
    5. In transition from defence to attack, the one who goes for the shuttle at the rear is the player whose area is invaded. If the shuttle goes to the right, the player on the right must be the one who step back to become the rear player while the left side go to the front, vice verca.
    6. For Shuttle played to your middle rear area, decide who will go, Usually the one who have the best smash, but maybe you should think if it's better to have a better front player who can "eat" the lousy return shots.
    7. In transition from defence to attack(when you lift\clear the shuttle high), the front player moves first, to whichever side he wants, and then the rear player moves to the empty side. But for practical reasons, just decide "I am on the right side, you on the left side" or vice verca,

    8. lastly, changing habits isn't easy, especially for clears and lifts. You may find yourself wanting to target the corners but your hand lift or clear to the middle instead, so just go with the process

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    It's hard to summarize all the details here. I'd suggest you check out Badmintonbible.com on Doubles. Singles and Doubles are two quite different games. When transitioning from Singles to Doubles, the following are some very basic ideas to start with:

    1. While there might be rare exception/variations, priority of shot choice should be first downward shots (hit downward whenever you could), then flat shots. Only if you couldn't do any of the others then you lift up. Hitting downward (doesn't have to be always hard hitting however) is the basic attack principle.

    2. Front player needs to follow the shot, instead of standing too close to the net, or stuck at the T. Otherwise, he would be cut off from most of the actions.

    3. Practice your low serves and explosive low serve return. Don't easily lift the low serve as you may be tempted to do.

    4. Practice block/drive returns in defense as a means to counter and regain your own attack. Don't keep lifting back to allow your opponents to continue their attacks.

    5. Use the middle gap between the two opponents, whether they're side-side, or front-back. This is unique to Doubles.

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    More thoughts -

    1. If you've spinning net shots - don't use them in doubles. You typically play your net shots differently. Racket face needs to be more vertical, compared to Singles net shots.
    2. Don't try to play tight net, while opponents are close by.
    3. Be aggressive at the net; if you have net brushes, you them. Your partner would cover the court should your shots be returned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    If you've spinning net shots - don't use them in doubles. You typically play your net shots differently. Racket face needs to be more vertical, compared to Singles net shots.
    I feel that's a little too strong.

    At a high standard of doubles you definitely do see a lot of net play with a "vertical" racket. That much is true. The players are taking the shuttle so early that they can frequently use this style of shot.

    However, that doesn't mean you can't play spinning net. It can win the rally when played at the right time. You just have to be more careful about when to play it, and how much height to give the shuttle.

    You can also play net spin with a "vertical" racket. It's not quite the same, and usually you won't get as much spin -- but you can still get some.

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    That's probably true. I guess I must be thinking about those net-spinning practice from whom I seldom saw them play Singles, and what my kid's coaches said about those net shots in Doubles. In fact, 4 coaches said that, one way or the other.

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