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  1. #1
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    Default How to drive the shuttle at defending smashes ?

    This is what I am told by my partner to do. He protested that I only lift to the back while defending smashes and instead I should slam the shuttle and drive it.

    I also watched recent doubles where there is a trend to not to lift it back when they smash but driving it to the midcourt sides and prepare for flat exchanges

    I tried it but most of the time I just give a chance away for the opponent's front player to netkill my return,

    Is there any drilling or technical explanation on how to do it?

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    It is correct in double to defend smash by lift shot, or if you are able to, you can do backstop drive to empty space.
    In a not-so-fast-paced double, it is better to do backstop drive because it is a counter-attack and the hit position is hit at the neck/shoulder height.
    Backhand backstop use backhand grip hold while forehand backstop use forehand grip hold, you can refer to kowi chandra youtube which teaches how to hold backhand and forehand grip. Hope this help

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by opikbidin View Post
    This is what I am told by my partner to do. He protested that I only lift to the back while defending smashes and instead I should slam the shuttle and drive it.

    I also watched recent doubles where there is a trend to not to lift it back when they smash but driving it to the midcourt sides and prepare for flat exchanges

    I tried it but most of the time I just give a chance away for the opponent's front player to netkill my return,

    Is there any drilling or technical explanation on how to do it?
    The first stage is to learn how to hit a block (a soft flat shot) towards the net. It needs to be accurate (it should cross the net above the singles sideline - its very close to the tramlines) and it needs to be controlled (soft so you don't hit it out).

    Once you have learnt to take the pace off the smash by playing a block, and place it accurately (which will take many months if you practice hard), you can then start to add power back into the shot, so that you hit it accurately and flat but with more power.

    Lifting in defence is one of the worst choices you can make in doubles, so playing drives and blocks is definitely a must learn skill. Obviously against weak players with weak smashes then lifting in defence is not a problem.

    If you need specific technique advice, here are some tips (I can give more detail if necessary):

    • You should wait for the smash with a thumb grip, and the racket elbow away from the body, with the racket between chest and waist height.
    • For shots that come close to the body or the backhand side, use the thumb grip you already have.
    • For forehands, just relax your hand and place your racket onto the forehand side, and adopt some sort of forehand basic or panhandle grip (the grip you choose depends on how relaxed you are and which grip you prefer using based on where the shuttle is).
    • You do not need a backswing. Start with the racket pointing roughly towards your opponent (so its in the middle between forehand and backhand sides of body). Then when you see which side the shuttle is coming, just relax your wrist and place the racket to the side the shuttle is coming (so the strings are pointing towards the shuttle), and then push the racket forwards in the direction you want the shuttle to go (so your racket frame returns to the middle position again).
    • For more power, squeeze the grip as you push forwards.
    • Note: the arm does not need to bend at all at the elbow. The racket remains out in front at all times.
    • You need to relax, and just calmly get the racket in position to hit the shuttle.
    • You should be aiming 1 foot above the net, so you don't make any mistakes. As you get better, you can aim closer to the net (in 12 months time for example).


    Good luck. The above technique can help develop world class defence, so its not a quick solution - its a long term goal - i.e. you should be aiming to fix your defence in about 2 years. You need to develop relaxed accuracy and control, which is what makes professionals so much better than amateurs.

    All the best
    Last edited by MSeeley; 04-17-2015 at 07:21 AM.

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    Ever watch table tennis?

    Top spin the shuttle back - not the loopy top spin but the fast flat one. The shuttle will shoot off the racquet, flat and fast rather than popup at the net.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    Ever watch table tennis?

    Top spin the shuttle back - not the loopy top spin but the fast flat one. The shuttle will shoot off the racquet, flat and fast rather than popup at the net.
    Yes. This is most effective defending on the "odd" side (if you're right handed) in doubles. The shuttle rise up to the net, but as soon as it passes the net it will start to fall quickly - same effect as playing topspin in table tennis or tennis.

    The beauty with this shot is that in defending xcourt it makes it far more difficult for net player to intercept it and maintain the attack and also keeps the shuttle in.

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    are we talking about backhand or both forehand and backhand?

    by topspin do you mean to actively supinate the forearm while hitting the shuttle? (for backhand)

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhSearsTower View Post
    are we talking about backhand or both forehand and backhand?

    by topspin do you mean to actively supinate the forearm while hitting the shuttle? (for backhand)
    I've only ever done this consciously on my BH.

    I can't describe this in terms of pronation or supination but effectively you need to brush upwards on contact with the shuttle with a forward motion.

    I do this in XD when serving low as you stand that little bit further back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by R20190 View Post
    I've only ever done this consciously on my BH.

    I can't describe this in terms of pronation or supination but effectively you need to brush upwards on contact with the shuttle with a forward motion.

    I do this in XD when serving low as you stand that little bit further back.
    You are correct: for the backhand, you supinate fully as you hit your shot forwards. Your strings will end up facing downwards. Its a very similar action to turning a key in a lock.

    The forehand side simply uses the opposite action.

  9. #9
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    Matt, do you find that supination is noticeably faster and more powerful than pronation?

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    haven't got the angle needed. still too much straight. the height is also variable, some easy kills made while others needed to be lifted although my opponent was just right there.

    I'm also not so sure about the forehand side. haven't got into it yet. still did some luck shots that somehow can cross the net. backhand is more reliable

    The shots are also a mix, some blocks, some drives, some half-half.

    I think I need to get the grips and the angle firsts

    my partners, just bear with me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by visor View Post
    Matt, do you find that supination is noticeably faster and more powerful than pronation?
    Maybe. What I do find is that there is very little wrist movement when you supinate (for backhands), hence the motion is quicker. Whereas with pronation you can also make more use of the wrist, so the action tends to be bigger or take longer.

    If you cut out the additional wrist movements that you are capable of doing on forehand shots, then it is the same speed as for the backhand shots. But as I said. Maybe.

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