User Tag List

View Poll Results: do you have to take a complete different mentality between singles and doubles?

Voters
983. You may not vote on this poll
  • YES

    851 86.57%
  • NO

    132 13.43%
Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 103 to 119 of 121
  1. #103
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I answer yes. When I playing single, it needs a lot of stamina and I will keep it play with my pace.I will play with patience and find the winning shots.As for double, I will play with all out attacking.I will take every single shots as fast as i can to win the game.For sure I will smash a lot compare to single that i will use rally.However even i smash a lot in double, i use less energy compare to single. For mentality, single i will try keep calm but as in double i will be furious as a tiger XD

  2. #104
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Yes. It is a different mindset for me too. I have to consciously switch or I will get the crap beat out of me.

    Simply put, IMHO:

    Doubles = Aggression, Singles = Attrition

    Doubles = Focus on the movement of the bird, Singles = Focus on the movement of the opponent

    That is not to say that one is defensive and one is offensive, just different. Singles require a lot of patience, doubles only require half (that is why you have a partner, no?)

    Keep on playing,

    T.
    Last edited by tcouture; 02-02-2011 at 02:26 PM.

  3. #105
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Personally I enjoy singles a lot more.
    That's probably because I've been scarred for life with partners who put on a "you caused us the game" look.
    In singles, all mistakes are my own, as with all points as well.
    I love singles matches because I know that if i don't go for a shot I'll lose the point.

    The more I get lectured in doubles, the worse I perform.
    But... it's useless to try and appeal. That's why I stick with singles.

  4. #106
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    26,817
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up I am not surprised that more than 85% voted for 'Yes'

    .
    I am not surprised that more than 85% voted for 'Yes'.

    IMHO, in Doubles, to be fast and furious against opponents is best.

    In Singles, to have control and steadiness for oneself is best.
    .

  5. #107
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Another issue I neglected to think about when I first read this poll (oh such a while ago) is that in singles you try to force these things:
    (1) Opponent's weakest shot(s): If they have a weakest shot (or few), it can be a very simply effective strategy to pick on it.
    (2) Opponent's footwork/stamina: If they can't get to shots quickly or get to them quickly for a long time, if you simply make accurate shots to the corners, they will tire out and if they tire out before you do, it's basically your win.
    (3) Rhythm/Mental: Try to get them into a certain mental state where they expect you to play a certain way/rhythm and then try to break that. It's the basis for trick shots as well as (2). If you can make them think you are going to rush a shot, if you see them reacting a certain way too early, you can change it up and slow your shot down and vice versa. This is useful for messing with how they react to you as well as their footwork/pacing.


    In doubles you try to force these things:
    (1) Gain attack: I think I read somewhere that at the professional level the first team to get the attack wins most of the time. I don't know if this is true, but I think it's usually quite true at the amateur level. Getting the attack means you can also (usually) control the tempo as well as the angles of the rallies.
    (2) Force teamwork/formation errors: Since in doubles you have two opponents and they MUST have some sort of transition system/rotation responses, if you can find out the weaknesses in their formations and transitions, you can make them hesitate (shot in-between them), run harder (if they have slow transitions or leave an area more exposed than others), isolate a player, etc.
    (3) Push opponent back: This is much more of an important issue in doubles, in my opinion. In singles, it's a deadly mistake to be either too close to or far away from the net, as there won't be anyone covering the other side for you. However, in doubles, if you end up too far away, you won't be able to get anything close to the net, which your partner won't likely be able to help you out with. However, if you are too close to the net and the opponents lift, it's a good chance either you or your partner can recover and even possibly attack. So if you can drop accurately, charge in quickly and take control of the net, it's fine if you can't recover (as long as your partner does), or if you go all the way back, your partner can probably cover the front somewhat. Similarly, if you can drive/smash your opponents with enough pressure, they will be forced back and then it will be harder for them to return farther (energy wise) and also you can now throw in drops with better effect.

  6. #108
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    26,817
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thumbs up Doubles Game: It is best to gain the attack

    Quote Originally Posted by hiroisuke View Post
    Another issue I neglected to think about when I first read this poll (oh such a while ago) is that in singles you try to force these things:
    (1) Opponent's weakest shot(s): If they have a weakest shot (or few), it can be a very simply effective strategy to pick on it.
    (2) Opponent's footwork/stamina: If they can't get to shots quickly or get to them quickly for a long time, if you simply make accurate shots to the corners, they will tire out and if they tire out before you do, it's basically your win.
    (3) Rhythm/Mental: Try to get them into a certain mental state where they expect you to play a certain way/rhythm and then try to break that. It's the basis for trick shots as well as (2). If you can make them think you are going to rush a shot, if you see them reacting a certain way too early, you can change it up and slow your shot down and vice versa. This is useful for messing with how they react to you as well as their footwork/pacing.


    In doubles you try to force these things:
    (1) Gain attack: I think I read somewhere that at the professional level the first team to get the attack wins most of the time. I don't know if this is true, but I think it's usually quite true at the amateur level. Getting the attack means you can also (usually) control the tempo as well as the angles of the rallies.
    (2) Force teamwork/formation errors: Since in doubles you have two opponents and they MUST have some sort of transition system/rotation responses, if you can find out the weaknesses in their formations and transitions, you can make them hesitate (shot in-between them), run harder (if they have slow transitions or leave an area more exposed than others), isolate a player, etc.
    (3) Push opponent back: This is much more of an important issue in doubles, in my opinion. In singles, it's a deadly mistake to be either too close to or far away from the net, as there won't be anyone covering the other side for you. However, in doubles, if you end up too far away, you won't be able to get anything close to the net, which your partner won't likely be able to help you out with. However, if you are too close to the net and the opponents lift, it's a good chance either you or your partner can recover and even possibly attack. So if you can drop accurately, charge in quickly and take control of the net, it's fine if you can't recover (as long as your partner does), or if you go all the way back, your partner can probably cover the front somewhat. Similarly, if you can drive/smash your opponents with enough pressure, they will be forced back and then it will be harder for them to return farther (energy wise) and also you can now throw in drops with better effect.
    .
    Well summarised, hiroisuke.

    I also believe in Point No.1 for the Doubles Game, which you have posted;

    Gain attack: I think I read somewhere that at the professional level the first team to get the attack wins most of the time. I don't know if this is true, but I think it's usually quite true at the amateur level. Getting the attack means you can also (usually) control the tempo as well as the angles of the rallies.
    .

  7. #109
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    13
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    ^^^ +1

    I was watching the men's double final from the last world championships and one of the commentators said that the first one to attack won the point 78% of the time... She did not say where she got that number from. My personal experience would lead me to believe that it is about the right ballpark.

    T.

  8. #110
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Smashikon, Driveland
    Posts
    705
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    hmmm, as singles is a totally different sports than doubles, it obviously needs a change of mentality...

  9. #111
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    badminton court
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    i also agree that singles and doubles are totally different. Drives are more in doubles and not often in singles. Footwork pattern is also different (well not completely) in singles and doubles. In singles sometimes you need to be patient but in doubles especially in men's you should be more aggresive.

    I also notice that a good doubles player may not be very good in singles.

  10. #112
    Regular Member Tadashi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    162
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chris-ccc View Post
    .
    Gain attack: I think I read somewhere that at the professional level the first team to get the attack wins most of the time. I don't know if this is true, but I think it's usually quite true at the amateur level. Getting the attack means you can also (usually) control the tempo as well as the angles of the rallies.
    .
    Yeah, it's true for professional finals in MD, too. Gaining the attack usually means a barrage of smashes and drops; 80:20 is the ratio; and it is seldom the case that the defender can get out of the defence formation (less than 50 per cent by chance) . The catch is that in MD the chance of gaining the attack is 50:50 regardless of being server or receiver in a rally. So, gaining the attack is essential, but in each rally, the chances are on par.

  11. #113
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Canada, BC, Burnaby
    Posts
    763
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I think I've completely specialized to doubles. I absolutely suck in single as I found out last week

  12. #114
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    manchester
    Posts
    165
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Doubles is for oldies, smash monsters and net hoggers. Singles test athleticism, movement and you need to play every type of shot.

  13. #115
    Regular Member jasonxjia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    KL
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Play and try to win.

  14. #116
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    44
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I personally hate singles, but love doubles. When I play doubles, most of my movement around the court is natural, and I don't get mentally tired. However with singles, I need to think about my every movement, position on the court and what kind of shot to play, it just doesn't come naturally to, simply because I don't play singles at all..

    So yes, a mentality switch is essential!

  15. #117
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    21
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I voted no. The only thing that changes is your exhaustion. You are not as exhausted when you play doubles but the biggest disadvantage is that you cannot really make up a plan because there are 2 different minds at play and you can only control one.

  16. #118
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    580
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I voted YES because whenever I play singles, I am happy , whenever I play doubles, I will be swearing and cursing .... due to clash of racquets, hyper-excited partners etc ...

    But for the peace of the club, we all agree to play only HALF SINGLE score system - first to reach 11, so everyone has a chance to play and not too exhausting since all of us are over-40s and 50s ...

  17. #119
    Regular Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Las Pinas City,Philippines
    Posts
    25
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    when playing doubles let your partner "play his/her game",besides if you have a good and experienced partner you'll have no problem.He/She will know when to let the shuttlecock come to you.Don't forget to "play your game" too,don't just depend on your partner(eventually he/she will get tired) .In singles,however,guard your court MORE carefully and keep UP your defense more often because nobody will help you except YOURSELF

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    : 07-07-2011, 06:14 AM
  2. Denmark Open 2005: Men's Singles, Men's Doubles, and Women's Doubles Quarter-Final
    By badMania in forum Dutch Open 2005 / Denmark Open 2005
    Replies: 171
    : 10-21-2005, 04:50 PM
  3. How to do an effetive serve in doubles, help Required
    By kaustubh in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 0
    : 12-06-2004, 02:55 AM
  4. What kind of racquet is Ti 10 singles,doubles, mixed doubles and why?
    By RaymondLin in forum Racket Recommendation / Comparison
    Replies: 4
    : 08-25-2004, 04:51 AM
  5. Doubles: when do YOU change positions?
    By Mag in forum Techniques / Training
    Replies: 22
    : 06-05-2002, 10:14 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •