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  1. #35
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    Otherwise you'll get smashed in an eye, which one depends on which way you turn round.

  2. #36
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    Default The most dangerous player on court may not be the opposition

    Someone at one of the clubs I played in Edmonton actually lost sight in one of his eyes courtesy of his partner. He turned to avoid a near-miss smash from an opponent only to get hit in the eye by his partner's racquet. I have also unfortunately hit my lady partner on her ear when I attempted a low drive that went alittle cross-court.

    I think one should try to avoid looking back and just trust the partner since s/he has the best field of vision at the backcourt. What partners do are sometimes more unpredictable than your opponents. At least you got the net to protect you from opponents' errant shots, partners' screwed shots could hurt you more as there's nothing to protect you except his/her good sense and (hopefully) skills.

  3. #37
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    Point taken. But in my case, i didnt even turn around. my partner smashed above me and his racket came from behind and smashed my face! how unfair is that?!

  4. #38
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    I guess it really depends on the level of your partner and how often you played with him/her. I am very reluctant to back up a partner who couldn't drop/smash properly. I won't even bother with proper doubles rotation since the coordination itself requires some time for instruction and more practice to adopt. One could find out how good the players are just from the way they hit in warm ups.

    If I get paired up with a newbie/lower intermediate, I could either avoid swinging at ambiguous shots and stay the hell away from him/her or I could just clarify issues before we start... namely, emphasize that s/he stay at the front and only back up to one side to defend when I lift. If s/he doesn't heed my advice, that'll be the last time I play with him/her. I usually don't have to go through all these hassle because there's more intermediates/advance players than beginners where I play.
    Last edited by cappy75; 04-16-2004 at 07:21 AM.

  5. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dill
    The weird thing is that many people see smashing directly at the lady on the net as a valid technique for gaining the upper hand in a game of mixed.
    The lady shouldn't be at the net though, if the opposition are in position to smash. Many of them just stay at the net though...sigh

  6. #40
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    Probably just an instinct for them to seek the protection of the net.

    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Nicholls
    The lady shouldn't be at the net though, if the opposition are in position to smash. Many of them just stay at the net though...sigh

  7. #41
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    More likely it's a trained response that has been inculcated in them by many men players who don't like the lady to "interfere" with the game. Keep her at the front where she won't get in the way

  8. #42
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    Hahaha talking about doubles... in my game yesterday when I was covering the back court, the opponent tapped to the base line and somehow I managed to retrieve it. My partner in front of my had turned her head to look behind, she thought that the shuttle had died. Next thing, the shuttle was smashed into her head! Lol. And after that she thought that I had smashed the shuttle into her from behind! Lol, she didn't know that it was the opponent until I told her. But perhaps it's a good thing she turned her head, or else the shuttle might have smashed into her eyes.

    I did smash into my opponents eye once during the doubles game. Good thing it wasn't that hard, she could continue the game as usual. If I'm not mistaken it was her right eye.

  9. #43
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    I've smacked a guy in his left eye before
    He thought I was going to drop but I drove the shuttle
    instead.... It put him out of the game and all other
    games for the rest of the night...

    I felt so terrible
    I spent the better part of the rest of the night apologising
    to him... He'd recover eventually (Thank God!) and was
    playing again after a couple of days... phew

  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by novl
    Your glasses are made of glass? I didn't know they still existed. If you see that your opponent is going to kill off the shuttle at the net and you're standing close just like a sitting duck, you should bend your head down, facing the floor. The worst that can happen is that you get hit at the back of your head or neck.
    Well, yeah, saving cost as well as reducing overall thickness. My vision is 525/500 the last time I remember and a plastic of this degree would be quite thick and expensive.

    The problem that day was in underestimating the opponent. The guy was fast, the lady a great setter up front and him the power guy. You can say that my partner, being a good player himself, likes to play around by putting cross court drops and I was hit twice because of that.

    I am a very straightforward kind of person in this, as I follow the conventional way of 'channel attack' and 'sustained pressure' as well as 'offensive mentality' very much, while him, being a singles player, likes to do shots which could be quite dangerous in doubles. I was on guard at the net, the shuttle went high behind me, I was expecting him to execute the three methods of play above since I have spoken to him a lot of about the formation and strategy but instead he placed a slow drop cross court in which most decent to great players would have no trouble pouncing.

    It happened again on the second set and this time, it broke.

    Perhaps it's my fault also as I was too slow to look away but it happened.

    Oh well. Perhaps I expected too much from my partner to follow all that.

  11. #45
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    Default Still fighting the urge...

    It seems that the instinct to look away or duck is stronger than just bringing the racquet up to the face. Even when I had the racquet right in front of me, I would still look away after being caught by surprise when the opposition pounced on my partner's slow crosscourt drops.

  12. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by cappy75
    It seems that the instinct to look away or duck is stronger than just bringing the racquet up to the face. Even when I had the racquet right in front of me, I would still look away after being caught by surprise when the opposition pounced on my partner's slow crosscourt drops.
    Very true, I was never afraid of standing in front of the net when playing doubles until my eye got smashed at. Now if my partner makes a mistake and give a high ball at the net, the first thing I tend to do is look away AND (not OR) duck. Must take hold of that fear and get rid of it, I'll never be able to defend taps and smashes in doubles at this rate. Perhaps I'll soon forget this smashed at eye incident and be prepared to defend whenever the shuttle is high at the front of the net.

  13. #47
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    Yes, best to move on and be more careful next time. Perhaps you should get a sports goggles for yourself when playing doubles.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joanne
    Very true, I was never afraid of standing in front of the net when playing doubles until my eye got smashed at. Now if my partner makes a mistake and give a high ball at the net, the first thing I tend to do is look away AND (not OR) duck. Must take hold of that fear and get rid of it, I'll never be able to defend taps and smashes in doubles at this rate. Perhaps I'll soon forget this smashed at eye incident and be prepared to defend whenever the shuttle is high at the front of the net.

  14. #48
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    Actually, I concentrate more on singles than doubles. Only reason why I play doubles is that my school team only has 3 girls in it while the guys have about 10 so I usually enter for both events, and another reason is my friend wants to be a doubles player, so I partner her in any doubles event .

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    Ah, so that means you'll be playing more doubles then. Does your coach help you out in doubles as well? If you're playing more, might as well get the strategies and tactics down for both disciplines.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joanne
    Actually, I concentrate more on singles than doubles. Only reason why I play doubles is that my school team only has 3 girls in it while the guys have about 10 so I usually enter for both events, and another reason is my friend wants to be a doubles player, so I partner her in any doubles event .

  16. #50
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    Yeah my coach coaches us both on doubles and singles. But I don't really like doubles because I can't co-ordinate too well. And my service in doubles isn't good, it's sometimes too high . And... well a lot more. My eye being at risk is another thing. Any idea how to get rid of that fear? Now whenever the shuttle is high at the net over the opponent's court I just DUCK!

  17. #51
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    Joanne,

    First thing you need to do is get a protective goggle for yourself. At least wear it while you recover from the terrible experience and while you play doubles. The wonderful thing about doubles is that you really have to work on coordination and rely on your teammate. After you get past the initial learning stage, you'll have so much fun playing it.

    Second is to work on your low serve, like Cheung and others said, it's the most important shot of the game. Try backhand service to lower the trajectory, trust me, it's easier than serving forehand.

    Third, get into the habit of keeping your racquet up... always until the rally is dead.

    Rotation is easy once you get used to your partner. Always start with offensive formation. Whoever on your team serves low, she stays at the front while the other person covers the back. Only change to side to side when one of you lifts/clears to the other side... that includes flick serves. The net player MUST choose a side of the court to defend FAST when the opponents go on offence, all the other person has to do is cover the remaining side. If either of you smash or drop, the other must cover the front.

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