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Thread: Tony Gunawan

  1. #52
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    I second this thought. One of my compatriot MD players watched Tony G.'s competitions for the past six to seven years. According to him, Tony is becoming an all around player from the hard-hitter at his early career. Tony was a hard-hitter circa 96-97 since his defense was weaker than his then partner, Rexy(?). Then moving along the way, he just keeps improving on all the skills such as defense and net; now, we see that he is really all-around and capable to cover the six and set up the chance for his partner. That is really amazing, "just getting better and better". I would guess that the coaching expereince made him see and think more; therefore, he can tackle the problems in the partnership and analyze the strong and weak sides of his opponents in a more efficient way to create the victory.

    -S.C.
    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    does anyone think that Tony have improved after he went to the USA?

    back in INA, he was at the same level with Halim, Candra and Sigit. Candra and Sigit had a slump with their disagreements and partner switching. in this WC, they have shown that they are almost back at their former level. Tony on the other hand, seem to have eclipse them and raise his own game yet another level. he is even faster and smart at the net, even when facing Sigit/Candra in the 2005 WC finals, he was able to put enormous pressure on them and always intercepting and keeping the birdie down. he was the key to the WC win.

  2. #53
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    hm....
    i wonder how a doubles pair of kim dong moon and tony gunawan would work...


    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung
    I don't mean any injustice to Kim Dong Moon. Really what I should have said clearly is (IMO) Tony is the best Men's doubles players AT THIS PRESENT MOMENT.

    As an all round doubles player (inc. Mxd) then Kim is probably the best but it is difficult to gauge his form as he has played so few tournaments recently and lost to China in the Sudirman Cup. If you go on recent tournament results, the Zhang Jun or Michael Sogaard have showed more consistent form.

    And YES, Kim Dong Moon showed awesome form in 1999/2000 until the Olympics crashing spectacularly early in the Mxd and losing in the Men's doubles. I was quite shocked that time. Who was he playing against in the Men's Doubles? None other than Tony Gunawen.

    In the Korean Open, the Ina pairings were split and their 1st tournament with (relatively) new partners were always going to be under pressure.

  3. #54
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    There is a possibility that might happen. If Kim Dong Moon immigrates to the U.S.A., then we might just see the Tony G. & KDM combo at work .

    Quote Originally Posted by B3nny H4nn4
    hm....
    i wonder how a doubles pair of kim dong moon and tony gunawan would work...

  4. #55
    Regular Member ctjcad's Avatar
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    Default Tony G. back for his last Olympics?..

    *reviving an old thread..

    http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-lon...9659.htmlstory
    ================================================== ====
    Badminton
    Tony Gunawan



    Making the Olympic team is the least of Tony Gunawan's problems.

    Not only are he and doubles partner Howard Bach the best badminton players in the country, as a doubles team, they're arguably the best in the Americas.

    Yet that doesn't mean they'll be together in London.

    To be eligible for the U.S. team, Gunawan, an Indonesian by birth, must first pass the citizenship test then go through a swearing-in ceremony in September. And that could be more unforgiving than any opponent he has faced on a badminton court.

    “With immigration,” Gunawan says, “you never know.”

    But that's only step one. After that, he wants to be sure he and Bach have a reasonable shot at a medal -- something no U.S. athlete has ever won in Olympic badminton competition.

    “If I feel that there's no chance, I don't want to play,” he says. “Because I've already been there. What for?”

    In the 2000 Sydney Games, Gunawan teamed with Candra Wijaya to win a gold medal for Indonesia in doubles. And a year later, he and new partner Halim Haryanto won a world championship. At 26, he had more than enough medals, but he was completely out of challenges.

    “So I was thinking ‘OK, what next?’ I didn't want to retire just like that,” he says.

    It was no longer about what badminton could do for him, but rather what he could do for badminton. Raising the level of play in the U.S. seemed like a reasonable goal, so six months after winning at the World Championships, Gunawan and his wife Eti, also an Indonesian Olympian, moved to the U.S.

    The idea was for Gunawan to coach Bach, among others. But he soon found the best way to improve their game was to play beside them.

    “When I came here, I was surprised. [The level] wasn't as low as I thought,” says Gunawan, who also coaches youth players in San Gabriel and Pomona. “It's just … they played too safe. They played conservative.

    “They just don't really know how to play, basically.”

    So Gunawan, 36, began teaching the Indonesian system, which is “attack, attack, attack.”

    And though the U.S. is never likely to rival Indonesia in badminton, Gunawan says the level of play is getting better. However before it can be seen as a serious competitive sport and not as something people do while waiting for the barbecue to heat up, badminton will have to start drawing more of the dedicated and gifted athletes that have been going into other sports.

    “It just needs to find some serious players,” says Gunawan, a slightly built, serious man who wore an Olympic sweatshirt stamped “Vancouver 2010” as he sipped coffee on the patio of a Starbucks not far from his West Covina home.

    “There must be a way to make it bigger. Because we're at the bottom. We can only move up,” he says.

    In the latest world rankings, he and Bach were 17th -- just outside what Gunawan considers medal hopefuls for London. But if he is sworn in as a U.S. citizen there's a chance he may relax his standards -- if only to keep a promise he made to his wife at the closing ceremony 11 years ago in Sydney.

    “The closing actually is mostly just a party. But the opening is amazing,” he says. “After the closing I talked to my wife and told her, ‘I want to go to the Olympics again.’”

    — Kevin Baxter, Photograph by Wally Skalij.

  5. #56
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Tony Gunawan has taken up the U.S. citizenship

    Quote Originally Posted by ctjcad View Post
    http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-lon...9659.htmlstory
    ================================================== ====

    To be eligible for the U.S. team, Gunawan, an Indonesian by birth, must first pass the citizenship test then go through a swearing-in ceremony in September. And that could be more unforgiving than any opponent he has faced on a badminton court.

    “With immigration,” Gunawan says, “you never know.”

    But that's only step one. After that, he wants to be sure he and Bach have a reasonable shot at a medal -- something no U.S. athlete has ever won in Olympic badminton competition.

    — Kevin Baxter.
    .
    Source: http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-...,3086034.story

    ====== * ====== part of article ====== * ======

    By Kevin Baxter
    September 10, 2011, 3:25 p.m.

    Badminton has taken Olympic champion Tony Gunawan to courts all over the world. But he never expected it would land him in federal court, which is where he found himself Tuesday morning, ordered to appear before U.S. Magistrate Judge Carla M. Woehrle on the sixth floor of the Roybal Federal Building in downtown Los Angeles.

    "I'm very nervous," Gunawan confessed, anxiously wringing his hands and smiling wanly.

    His sport has brought him money and acclaim far beyond what he could have imagined growing up in East Java, Indonesia. But the award he was about to receive from Woehrle was U.S. citizenship.

    "Raise your right hand," the judge instructed. And Gunawan, his rail-thin 5-foot-9 frame draped in a crisply pressed blue shirt and pleated black pants, snaps to attention. When he finishes reciting the 141-word oath of allegiance — pledging to support and defend a country he barely knew a decade ago — he smiles again as the five witnesses in the otherwise empty courtroom applaud.

    Six months ago citizenship was simply a means to an end for Gunawan, something he needed to compete in October's Pan American Games and next summer's London Olympics.

    But moments after leaving the courthouse, Gunawan takes a seat on a concrete bench and offers another confession.

    "I've been looking forward to this for a long time," he says, his emotions getting ahead of his English. "Very lucky me that I got this opportunity to stay and work in the U.S. and then raise up my family here.

    "So it's very fortunate. I never dreamed, actually, about this before when I was in Indonesia. It's quite a big moment for me."

    And there may be other big moments ahead. With the citizenship issue resolved, Gunawan and partner Howard Bach are now clear to compete in next month's Pan American Games, where they will defend the doubles title Bach won with another partner four years ago. Then come next summer's London Games and a chance at badminton's biggest prize, an Olympic gold medal.

    Yet all that is secondary for Gunawan, who already has an Olympic title and two world championships. His goal now, he says, is to raise the profile of badminton in his new home, where it is seen largely as a backyard barbecue activity.

    ====== * ====== part of article ====== * ======
    .

  6. #57
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    congratulations Tony!!

    yes. as i was heard that is the plan. for them to play Olympics together.

  7. #58
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Arrow I believe that this could be Tony's last participation at the Olympic Games

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    congratulations Tony!!

    yes. as i was heard that is the plan. for them to play Olympics together.
    .
    Yes, Congratulations to Tony !!!

    He has just made it in time for the 2012 Olympic Games, playing for the USA.

    I believe that this could be Tony's last participation at 'The Games'.
    .

  8. #59
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    I join in to congratulate Tony Gunawan as a foreign badminton talent who has now gone on to become a citizen in his adopted country.

    Hope he will contribute to helping to popularize badminton in the US and bring glory to his country just as the great Dave Freeman has done many decades ago.

  9. #60
    Regular Member george@chongwei's Avatar
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    So he's finally an AMERICAN

  10. #61
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    he's just like david beckham in football.

  11. #62
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    I've met Tony this week at the 2011 HK open.

    I know it's his last tournament in HK. I am really, really sad to know that it's the last tournament and the last match I'll ever see him play ( ( Will miss him.

    I remember his comeback year when he played with Minarti mixed doubles in HK just for fun. You could see all the players in the audience move over to watch that match.

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