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  1. #35
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    If this is true it could be a good or a bad move. Good as it allows more focus on the individual players, and could create healthy competition. Bad because it could create division, or favouritism of the coaches (IE what if LCW decides he would prefer to have some coaching from Li as well?)

  2. #36
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    Status of Misbun's post with BAM will be out today...

  3. #37
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    Default BAM to announce coaches’ new roles today

    Source: The Star Online (Monday 10 Jan 2005)

    PETALING JAYA: Senior men's singles shuttlers Wong Choong Hann and Lee Tsuen Seng may be put under the charge of new national coach Li Mao.

    The Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) will announce the roles of their newly hired Chinese coach after a coaching and training committee meeting today.

    The announcement will clear the air over the functions of the BAM’s current national singles chief coach, Misbun Sidek.

    There are indications that the BAM will split their national training set-up into two groups – one will be geared towards short-term goals and the other will be a project side with the a long-term plans.

    Li Mao and Misbun will probably head each group. Misbun has voiced his willingness to work with Li Mao and there will be provisions for joint training sessions.

    There is also a possibility for Li Mao to take charge of the women's singles players. The women's singles players had trained under Fanny Kumala Mergawati, who chose not to renew her contract which expired at the end of month.

    Li Mao could be looking at helping Malaysia attain excellence in the 2006 Asian Games in Doha while Misbun may likely handle the team with long-term targets.

    Misbun may get to keep players like Lee Chong Wei, Mohd Hafiz Hashim and Kuan Beng Hong and rope in youngsters with potential and the targets are to achieve excellence at the 2008 Beijing Olympics and the subsequent one in 2012.

    Both Choong Hann and Tsuen Seng have run into a slump since coming under the charge of Misbun two years ago and they can look forward to a change of fortunes under Li Mao.

    Choong Hann is optimistic that he will get the opportunity to work under Li Mao. He had stated: “ I do not mind training under Li Mao if that is what the BAM want. I have to look at it positively.”

    Besides Misbun and Li Mao, the role of other coaches under the BAM banner will also be clearer today.

    There are now seven coaches in the Bukit Jalil Sports School (BJSS) – Sun Chenhua (chief coach), Zhang Hongyu, Wong Tat Meng, Chang Kim Wai, Jeremy Gan, Koay Kar Lin and Mohd Salleh Suwandi.

    Six others are in the national training centre in Bukit Kiara – Yap Kim Hock (doubles chief coach), Rashid Sidek, Teh Seu Bok, Rosman Razak, Cheah Soon Kit and Pang Cheh Chang.

  4. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesd20
    If this is true it could be a good or a bad move. Good as it allows more focus on the individual players, and could create healthy competition. Bad because it could create division, or favouritism of the coaches (IE what if LCW decides he would prefer to have some coaching from Li as well?)
    I agree with this, it would be rather nasty if one player decides that he rather be trained by the other coach. I wonder if BAM will stipulate this into their contracts?
    I vote they sack Misbun. just chuck him back to Nusa Mahsuri. Either that or give him a managerial role and get him out of coaching.
    My two cents for today

  5. #39
    Regular Member jug8man's Avatar
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    New Straits Times » Sport

    BADMINTON: Don't make the same mistake, BAM
    By K.M. Boopathy

    Jan 10:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARE the BA of Malaysia (BAM) ready to repeat previous mistakes should they decide to appoint another foreigner as the chief coach?
    This will be the major issue when the BAM coaching and training committee meeting is held at the Juara Stadium today.

    While China's Li Mao is assured of his position as the men's singles coach, BAM should ensure Misbun Sidek remains in his position as the chief coach to prevent history from repeating itself.

    Li Mao has top-level coaching experience with his tenure with the China and South Korean national squads for more than a decade but his knowledge of local norms and the character of the national players is almost nil.

    This is the role Misbun can play if he is appointed as the head coach.

    Misbun's input on the national players will be very helpful for Li Mao, not only to build good rapport with them but to conduct effective coaching.

    BAM have to keep in mind the previous foreign coaches who flopped when given the job of supremo.

    Under Dane Morten Frost Hansen between 1997-1999, there was internal rift between him, the Chinese coaches and several senior players.

    It was never an ideal working environment as Chinese coaches Chen Kang and Chen Chanjie were the first to leave and this was followed by Frost's resignation at the end of 1999.

    Indonesian Indra Gunawan assumed the position of chief singles coach in 2001 but could not work with his local counterparts Kwan Yoke Meng and Yong Hock Kin.

    The national squad was broken into two camps with Indra shifting the training base of the senior players from Juara Stadium to a private training hall in Balakong as it became apparent that the veteran coach could not see eye-to-eye with Yoke Meng and Hock Kin.

    Eventually, Yoke Meng and Hock Kin resigned, while BAM chose not to renew Indra's contract in 2003.

    Having been badly burnt, BAM decided to place their faith in local coaches and this was when Misbun took over and his younger brother Rashid Sidek was appointed as his assistant with Tey Siu Bok.

    All four coaches are likely to be retained but BAM should simply let Misbun take charge as he has been with the current set of players for the last two years.

    This will make it unnecessary to change the entire training set-up but just to improvise based on the inputs given by Li Mao.

    Despite Li Mao's credentials as an effective coach, he is not known for the ability to lead from the front and asking him to take charge could prove very costly to Malaysia.

    The presence of two coaches with different technical approaches could help the national players.

    Li Mao's strength is speed and power, while Misbun focuses on stroke play and stamina. If these qualities are blended together, the national players can become strong all-round players like the Chinese and the Indonesians.

    BAM must decide wisely.

  6. #40
    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jug8man
    New Straits Times » Sport

    BADMINTON: Don't make the same mistake, BAM
    By K.M. Boopathy

    Jan 10:
    I think this write-up by Boopathy is timely and I also hope that BAM will take his views seriously by not "chucking out" or "sacking" Misbun Sidek, some strong and unnecessary language used by some of our posters.

    To me, Misbun should be considered a badminton treasure by Malaysia. It took such a long, long time to produce someone like him, despite his 'peculiar' ways when he was a young player (like sporting a colourful 'Mohawk' or Mohican hairstyle and defying authority to some extent). For how many of his kind can you find who excelled as a player and continued as a coach, Malaysia's chief singles coach now, who is even willing to condescend to a lower rank if necessary, just so that he could continue to develop young badminton talents to become future stars. And if Misbun meant what he has said regarding the appointment of Li Mao, he has indeed grown out of the immaturity of his youth and into a man of wisdom and one who really cares about the development of badminton in Malaysia.

    Wise counsel by Boopathy on the cultural aspects of the Malaysian badminton scene. Indeed, Li Mao will first have to learn about how to assimilate into the Malaysian culture, understand his charges, their mentality and motivations before he can impart his knowledge successfully to them and make further progress. Of course Misbun has the advantage in this regard. Even then, he still faced difficulty in handling some of his trainees. And to say that Misbun has not been able to produce world beaters is not quite fair to the man. Those charges directly under him, Hafiz and Chong Wei in particularly, have beaten some of the best in the world from time to time. Only that not every player can consistently reproduce their good form throughout the year - not even Lin Dan who lost to Ronald Susilo at Athens.

    To expect too much from Misbun in two years as national coach may not be justifiable and more time should be allowed to see through the plans and achieve set targets.

    If I were BAM, I will take Booparty's advice.

  7. #41
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    Default Misbun still has his value

    Quote Originally Posted by Loh
    I think this write-up by Boopathy is timely and I also hope that BAM will take his views seriously by not "chucking out" or "sacking" Misbun Sidek, some strong and unnecessary language used by some of our posters.

    To me, Misbun should be considered a badminton treasure by Malaysia. It took such a long, long time to produce someone like him, despite his 'peculiar' ways when he was a young player (like sporting a colourful 'Mohawk' or Mohican hairstyle and defying authority to some extent). For how many of his kind can you find who excelled as a player and continued as a coach, Malaysia's chief singles coach now, who is even willing to condescend to a lower rank if necessary, just so that he could continue to develop young badminton talents to become future stars. And if Misbun meant what he has said regarding the appointment of Li Mao, he has indeed grown out of the immaturity of his youth and into a man of wisdom and one who really cares about the development of badminton in Malaysia.

    Wise counsel by Boopathy on the cultural aspects of the Malaysian badminton scene. Indeed, Li Mao will first have to learn about how to assimilate into the Malaysian culture, understand his charges, their mentality and motivations before he can impart his knowledge successfully to them and make further progress. Of course Misbun has the advantage in this regard. Even then, he still faced difficulty in handling some of his trainees. And to say that Misbun has not been able to produce world beaters is not quite fair to the man. Those charges directly under him, Hafiz and Chong Wei in particularly, have beaten some of the best in the world from time to time. Only that not every player can consistently reproduce their good form throughout the year - not even Lin Dan who lost to Ronald Susilo at Athens.

    To expect too much from Misbun in two years as national coach may not be justifiable and more time should be allowed to see through the plans and achieve set targets.

    If I were BAM, I will take Booparty's advice.
    I agree with loh. It is too early to sack Misbun. Misbun still has his value. IT is a big loss for BAM for losing Misbun when Li Mao still new to Malaysia players. Misbun can be the agent to minimise the layer of communication between Li Mao and the team (IF he decide to cooperate with Li Mao).

    Yes, sidek brothers had been arrogant, I will blame this to government. Luxurious reward for a small winning? Taxpayers of Mlaaysia should voice out their dissatisfaction.

  8. #42
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    I Agree with Loh as well. He is showing that he still wants to be coaching malaysia and improve the team. It would be very easy for him to walk back to Nusa and coach them forever, but he wants to make a difference.

    To be critical of him, you may think he has had no success, and he used to have two World ranked top players (roslin and Wong).

    However this is IMO a wrong suggestion, as both Wong and Roslin were then ( I believe) at their peak or thereabouts. However he has given malaysia an all england crown, and a host of big tournament finals (WC, China open etc...) Did malaysia do better before? No is the answer. And there is no doubt he has influenced LCW into becoming a fluent player.

  9. #43
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    Default NEWS : BAM appoint China’s Li Mao as ‘high performance coach’

    Source : The Star Malaysia
    http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story...690&sec=sports

    BAM appoint China’s Li Mao as ‘high performance coach’

    BY RAJES PAUL KUALA LUMPUR: China's Li Mao will not be the singles chief coach of the Malaysian national badminton team.

    The Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) have designated Li Mao as their “high performance coach” and he will work hand-in-hand with Misbun Sidek.

    The BAM president, Datuk Nadzmi Mohd Salleh, introduced Li Mao as an additional hand in their coaching set-up for the national elite squad after a coaching and training committee meeting at the Juara Stadium in Bukit Kiara here yesterday.

    Misbun was also named as a “high performance coach” yesterday. But he could still be retained as the chief coach.

    The BAM have chosen to defer making an announcement on the appointment of the chief coach for both the national singles and doubles players to Friday. The previous set-up had Yap Kim Hock as the doubles chief coach.

    “Today, we formally appoint Li Mao as one of the singles coaches at the national training centre,” said Nadzmi.

    “He will be the high performance coach but not the singles chief coach. His job functions and those for the other coaches in the national set-up will be announced after our exco meeting on Friday.

    “After we announce our structural changes, the coaches will decide among themselves the players who they want to train.”

    Nadzmi added that the national training set-up would be divided into two groups.

    “The first will be the elite group gearing up for the 2006 Asian Games and the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Misbun and Li Mao will be the coaches of the singles players in this group,” he said.

    Among the players in this group are Wong Choong Hann, Lee Chong Wei, Mohd Hafiz Hashim, Kuan Beng Hong and Yeoh Kay Bin.

    “The second will be a Project group of youngsters who will look at targets beyond the 2008 Olympics. We have to look at long-term plans following the experience in the Athens Olympics (in August last year),” said Nadzmi.

    “We will name the chief coaches for both the elite and project squads on Friday. They will be local coaches.”

    Players below the age of 16 are expected to form the Project squad. And this group of players are expected to complement the BAM’s junior players' programme in the Bukit Jalil Sports School.

    On why a foreign coach was brought into the elite programme after two years of work by local coaches, Nadzmi said: “The fact is we lack high quality men’s singles coaches.

    “We cannot remain static. (We) must be dynamic and open to changes. We must bring in new blood to improve on the standard of our training programmes. Sometimes we need to break tradition if it brings benefit in the long run.”

  10. #44
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    Default NEWS : Set to go military with Li

    Source : The Star Online > Sports http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2005/1/11/sports/9865288&sec=sports
    Tuesday January 11, 2005
    Set to go military with Li

    KUALA LUMPUR: With his height and stout built, balding head and stern face, the Badminton Association of Malaysia's (BAM) latest foreign recruit looks more like a military officer.

    And the national players can expect a very tough training regime under China's Li Mao, who was officially named as the “high performance coach” for the singles players yesterday.

    And among the players the 46-year-old Li Mao will work on together with Misbun Sidek are Lee Chong Wei, Wong Choong Hann, Mohd Hafiz Hashim, Kuan Beng Hong and Yeoh Kay Bin. The targets are the 2006 Asian Games in Doha and the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

    Li Mao have a wealth of experience as a coach, 20 years to be exact, to help make the Malaysian players world and Olympic champions.

    On his training style, Li Mao flashed a smile and said: “There will be only one style and that is the Li Mao style. And how it is done is a secret.”

    On his expectations of the Malaysian players, the former player who hails from Zhejiang Province, said that it would take some time for him to assess them.

    “I have only seen Chong Wei and Choong Hann playing in international tournaments,” said Li Mao through an interpreter at a press conference yesterday.

    “I do not have opinions on the other players. I need some time to see their performances in training.”

    He, however, did not mince his words on what he hoped to contribute to Malaysian badminton.

    “For me, the only two important tournaments are the World Championships and the Olympic Games. The others have no meaning to me,” he said.

    “As a professional coach, who have been with China and South Korea, it is my job to help the players reach the highest level.”

    In his tenure as coach of the Chinese team, Sun Jun emerged as the runner-up in the 1997 World Championships. He also helped Dong Jiong to emerge as the runner-up in the 1996 Atlanta Olympics.

    At the 2000 Sydney Olympics, both his charges, Ji Xinpeng and Xia Xuanze, were among the medallists. Xinpeng won the gold and Xuanze bagged the bronze.

    In the last four years with the South Korean team, Shon Seung-mo finished as the runner-up to Indonesian Taufik Hidayat at the Athens Olympics last year.

    And for the first time in the Olympic series, South Korea had the maximum of three qualifiers in the men's singles. The others being Lee Hyun-il and Park Tae-sang.

    On why he chose to come to Malaysia, Li Mao said: “I could have stayed in South Korea but I found the language a barrier.

    “I could not transfer my knowledge to them to the fullest.

    “I will still face language problem here but there are so many who speak the same language as me and they can translate it for those who do not understand.

    “And when I was approached to coach in Malaysia, I had no second thoughts on taking the offer.”

    Li Mao is the latest of many foreign coaches to have come to Malaysian shores. They included the Chinese brigade of Fang Kaixiang, Chen Changjie, Han Jian and Yang Yang; Dane Morten Frost Hansen; Korean Park Joo-bong; and Indonesian Indra Gunawan.

    While his coaching career had been impressive, Li Mao does not boast of having an illustrious playing career.

    His best achievement was reaching the quarter-finals of the World Cup in 1982. He was the national champion in the mixed doubles in 1979 and had a winners' medal to show from the team competition of 1987 Asian Championships.



    NAME: Li Mao

    AGE: 46

    DATE OF BIRTH: 20-8-1958

    PROVINCE: Zhejiang, China.

    COACHING STINTS: China (1994-2000); South Korea (2000-2004).

    n PERSONAL ACHIEVEMENTS

    PLAYER: 1979 (mixed doubles national champion); 1982 World Cup (last eight); and 1987 Asian Championships team champion.

  11. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by FEND.
    Source : The Star Online > Sports http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story.asp?file=/2005/1/11/sports/9865288&sec=sports
    Tuesday January 11, 2005




    Set to go military with Li

    KUALA LUMPUR: With his height and stout built, balding head and stern face, the Badminton Association of Malaysia's (BAM) latest foreign recruit looks more like a military officer.

    And the national players can expect a very tough training regime under China's Li Mao, who was officially named as the “high performance coach” for the singles players yesterday.

    “For me, the only two important tournaments are the World Championships and the Olympic Games. The others have no meaning to me,” he said.

    .
    wow, i like this guy already, he's quite a character eh? , i mean, to say that wc and og are the MOST important is ordinary, but to say that those are the ONLY tourneys that important, thats ,,,,
    how come that this thread isnt merged with the previous thread about li mao?

  12. #46
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    New Straits Times » Sport

    BADMINTON: Li Mao, Misbun join forces
    K.M. Boopathy

    Jan 11:
    THE BA of Malaysia (BAM) took the easy way out yesterday by naming both Li Mao and Misbun Sidek as national senior singles coaches for their 2006-2008 Project.

    But the question is, was that the best decision?

    While the coaching and training committee chairman Datuk Nadzmi Salleh, who is also BAM president, said the move was to increase the number of quality coaches for the national squad, it could have adverse effects.

    Misbun will work alongside the Chinese coach until 2008 but it will be a monumental task of making them work together to produce results.

    Li Mao has already stressed that the training will be done his way and this is where the difficulties will occur as Misbun's training programme is different from the one followed by the Chinese coach.

    That alone is more than enough to create a rift between the two coaches, while the players might find it difficult to adapt.

    The ideal situation would be to put Li Mao in charge of the back-up players where he can turn them into world beaters, rather than trying to change the training methods of the existing players. But the BAM think otherwise.

    However, Nadzmi is confident that Li Mao and Misbun are capable of working as a team to produce results and also re-affirmed that the appointment of the Chinese coach was not done to undermine local coaches.

    "Li Mao will be the High Performance coach with Misbun in the national senior team. Our target is to win medals in the 2008 Olympics (in Beijing) and we need to change our structure and strategies to achieve them," said Nadzmi.

    "He is one of our singles coaches but not the head coach. We would be appointing the chief coach after our council meeting (on Friday) and it will most likely be a local candidate.

    "Positions of all the other coaches will also be finalised on Friday.

    "We cannot be static although we decided to give emphasis on the local coaches. BAM are building a strong foundation and changes are inevitable."

    BAM have turned to foreign expertise since 1986 when Fang Kaixiang from China was the first to be roped in. He remains to be the only coach to have had a successful stint in Malaysia.

    Despite being in a complicated situation, Misbun is still convinced that the difference in training approach is not a problem but a blessing in disguise.

    "Fitness is my forte, while Li Mao follows the Chinese way where speed, power and explosive movements come into play. If these qualities can be combined, we will have an effective formula,' said Misbun.

    "However, we must be specific and the players should be trained based on their strengths. It is hard to change the entire style of the seniors at this stage of their career.

    "Li Mao has worked in China and Korea and his knowledge will be invaluable in terms of strategy and tactical preparations. I believe we can work together to bring the best out of the players."

    However, Li Mao is known strong-willed and it will be easier said than done for Misbun.

    It will be a different scenario if BAM decide to appoint Misbun as the chief coach in order to make the new coaching structure run without problems.

    Meanwhile, Li Mao, who was in charge of the South Korean singles squad between 2000 and 2004, said that the language barrier was one of the main reasons which stopped him from getting better results in Korea but he does not expect such problems in Malaysia.

    "I will not have language problems here. The majority of the players can understand me and they can easily translate for the others," said Li Mao.

  13. #47
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Badminton: New coach unveiled

    RIZAL HASHIM - Malay Mail

    Jan 11:

    LI MAO was yesterday unveiled by the BA of Malaysia (BAM) as the chief coach to take Malaysian shuttlers to a higher plane.

    Although the national body evaded all questions pertaining to Li Mao’s specific job function, his appointment as the chief coach is expected to be formalised at a BAM exco meeting on Friday.

    At a packed Press conference after a coaching committee meeting at Bukit Kiara yesterday, BAM president Datuk Nadzmi Salleh revealed little, telling news hounds Li Mao would work alongside Misbun Sidek as coaches in charge of men’s singles.

    Judging from his credentials, Li Mao, who turns 47 in August, is expected to chart the programme for the whole squad, with medals in various major tournaments in 2006 and 2008 as his ultimate objective.

    It is learnt the former South Korea coach and Misbun will work the present batch of shuttlers who will be divided into three sections – the elite group, the senior squad and the back-up squad based at the Bukit Jalil Sports School (BJSS).

    Assisting Li Mao and Misbun will be Rashid Sidek and Tay Seu Bock.

    Nadzmi who tried his best to evade leading questions on Li Mao’s terms of reference, refuted suggestions BAM had gone against their policy two years ago, which was to rely on local coaches.

    “It is not a question of contradicting ourselves. We cannot remain static if we want to improve. If we want to move forward, we must be dynamic and open to changes. Everyday is a learning process for us and in order to improve, we need fresh ideas and new blood,” said Nadzmi.

    “Normally people resist change. But this is one of BAM’s ways to see how best we can prepare ourselves for the challenges ahead. Similarly, if you need to turn around a company, you have to impose some changes and make new appointments.”

    Ultimately, Nadzmi said, Li Mao and Misbun will have to answer to the performance director who will be appointed later, subject to approval from the Sports Ministry.

    “The performance director’s position is in line with the Ministry’s vision of having a technical personnel working with them hand in hand. We are in the midst of identifying the right candidate, and he could be local.

    “Details of our plans, including the nature of Li Mao’s exact job, will be revealed after the exco meeting on Friday,” said Nadzmi.

    Also present were BAM general manager, P. Ganga Rao, Misbun and doubles coach, Yap Kim Hock.

    According to Nadzmi, Li Mao’s presence was crucial to ease the burden on Misbun, who had been spreading himself thin taking charge of the singles shuttlers, among them Muhammad Hafiz Hashim, Lee Chong Wei, Wong Choong Hann and Lee Tsuen Seng.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Regular Member Loh's Avatar
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    Default China Beware

    Here's another pic of the triumphant 'trio' who can put Malaysia back into world reckoning. If what I've learnt from some posts here about the not too cordial relationship between the two China Li's, then Li Mao certainly has an axe to grind with Li Yongbo. As Li Mao is so familiar with the Chinese system and their top players, he will most certainly be able to guide the Malaysian top guns with more successes in the international arena.

    Contrary to what was thought to be an impending difficult relationship between Misbun and Li Mao, they seem to have started off on the right note as the following statements by both coaches will show:

    Li Mao:

    "I have known Misbun for a very long time. In fact, I have played against him many times (in) those days and unfortunately I always lost (laughs loudly). It will take some time to get adjusted but there should not be any problem working together with Misbun. For now, I can only say that there will be cooperation between both of us. We will have our roles to play. My goal is to help the players achieve their highest potential."

    Misbun Sidek:

    "I am looking forward to working with Li Mao. In the last two years, I have improved on the fitness level of several players. But I admit that some of my ways did not bring the best out of some of the players. And this is where Li Mao's expertise will come to play. Both of us can complement each other. He will bring in the Chinese and Korean styles and I will have my Malaysian style. Two heads are better than one. The hope is for the players to get the best out of it."

    Now, I must say that the Malaysian and Chinese/Korean styles will be a deadly concoction. Let China and the other badminton giants beware!

    It is interesting to note that Li Mao admitted that he always lost to Misbun. But so far, Li seems to be a terrific coach if the results of the Korean singles players are anything to go by. So it somewhat substantiates the belief that you need not be a champion player to be a good coach.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Loh; 01-11-2005 at 04:03 AM.

  15. #49
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    I hope the combination of Misbun and Li Mao's coaching styles will bring Msian players to a much greater level. We have the best coaches in town so far.. i hope nothing will go wrong this time. Stop politicking and move foward.
    I'm sure Li Mao also would want to prove something to china as well. Will try to go and look at his coaching style when i go back to Msia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesd20
    I Agree with Loh as well. He is showing that he still wants to be coaching malaysia and improve the team. It would be very easy for him to walk back to Nusa and coach them forever, but he wants to make a difference.

    To be critical of him, you may think he has had no success, and he used to have two World ranked top players (roslin and Wong).

    However this is IMO a wrong suggestion, as both Wong and Roslin were then ( I believe) at their peak or thereabouts. However he has given malaysia an all england crown, and a host of big tournament finals (WC, China open etc...) Did malaysia do better before? No is the answer. And there is no doubt he has influenced LCW into becoming a fluent player.
    I not sure I agree with this, he has be a resonable coach, but after Olympic failure - can he contiune. Before anything else is said why treat him differntly than Morten or Indra,. After Morten worked to created some of the foundations, and Indra polished them, but BAM seem to terminate them failry quickly after what could be seen as no success or a flat period.

    Some players seem to be given quite a leway, should Roslin contiune, what are his successes, Mohd Hafiz has realy not performed except for the All England - has he peaked?

    While Li Mao has have every success with Korean Singles just look at getting three into Olmpics, and the Men's Singles Silver, who would have thought SHON Seung Mo could have got so far, he beat Sony(8th seed) 6-15 15-9 9-15 and Cheng Hong (2nd Seed) 10-15 15-4 15-10 . while PARK beat BAO Chunlai (4th Seed) 15-11 15-12.

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    This has all the ingredients for the greatest drama in the history of modern malaysian badminton. Either it will go Skywards!! or it will explode even before leaving mission command.

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