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  1. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven
    Can anybody tell me what is Nusa Mashuri and why Nusa Mashuri is in Bam List
    Nusa Mashuri is a badminton club started by the Sidek family. They are in BAM list cause they produce acceptable international standard players....???

  2. #70
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    Default NEWS : Kim Hock and Rashid head national badminton team

    Source : http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story...064&sec=sports

    The Star Online > Sports
    Saturday January 15, 2005
    Kim Hock and Rashid head national badminton team

    BY RAJES PAUL KUALA LUMPUR: Yap Kim Hock is the new supremo of the national badminton team.

    Yesterday, the Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM), as expected, named former Olympic Games medallists Kim Hock and Rashid Sidek as the chief coaches of the senior and second-string sides respectively.

    However, the BAM did the unexpected when they gave Kim Hock and Rashid the authority to name their coaches and players for their respective programmes within the next two weeks.

    Kim Hock and Rashid are all smiles Friday after being named as chief coaches of the senior and junior project sides respectively. - STARpic by Victor K.K. Ng
    The 35-year-old Kim Hock will head the Project Squad 2006-2008, which will be geared towards achieving immediate results at the Doha Asian Games next year and the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008.

    The 37-year-old Rashid was named as the head of the Project Squad 2010-2012. This is a long-term plan to prepare a solid team that can win honours at the 2010 Asian Games and 2012 Olympic Games.

    Kim Hock was elated about being given the honour. “I agreed to take up this job not because of fame or money. I know I am capable of doing it and I am confident. This is an opportunity to prove myself.”

    Rashid was equally happy with the opportunity to do what he loves most. He said: “With the experiences of having trained under so many coaches before, I am confident I can carry out the tasks ahead. It is a long commitment but I am happy to work with the youngsters.”

    After announcing that the BAM's new coaching and training structure would be divided into two project squads with each getting a lot of focus and attention, BAM president Datuk Nadzmi said the appointments of Kim Hock and Rashid showed that the BAM had faith in local coaches.

    “Both Kim Hock and Rashid have coaching experience. Both have played in the Olympic Games and won medals,” said Nadzmi after an exco meeting here yesterday. At the 1996 Atlanta Games, Kim Hock won a silver medal with Cheah Soon Kit while Rashid won a bronze medal.

    “Being products of our system, both understand the sport, the sentiments of the people and the high expectations that come with it. They do not have to go through a learning process. They can get cracking now,” added Nadzmi.

    Kim Hock has a short but proven track record as a coach.

    “Our doubles players – Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah – managed to become world number one under Kim Hock's guidance. Unfortunately, they were not able to win a medal at the Athens Olympic Games,”

    And it was the failure in Athens that moved BAM to introduced the Project Squad 2010-2012.

    “For the first time, BAM have drawn up a long-term plan. We believe these changes are in line with our aspirations to bring back our first Olympic Games gold medal,” said the BAM president.

    Nadzmi said both coaches had been given the power to choose their own coaches and players.

    “The coaches are given sufficient authority. We are giving them the responsibility to discuss and come back with the names of coaches and players that they want. Then, we will hold them accountable. They will come back to us (the coaching and training committee) with their plans,” said Nadzmi.

    On whether there would be a problem in the appointment of Kim Hock as head coach ahead of more senior men like Misbun Sidek and China's Li Mao, Nadzmi brushed aside any such possibility

    Kim Hock, he said, had good rapport with Misbun Sidek and should not face any problem communicating in Mandarin with Li Mao.

    Meanwhile, Kim Hock will remain as double coach but Nadzmi said, the double job would not be too much for him.

    “Unlike in the past, the chief coaches will not be dumped with a lot of paperwork. We will have a full-time manager to help them. It will be a team effort.”

    Nadzmi, however, was clear about what he expected from his newly-appointed chief coaches.

    “They may be young but I hope they will rise to the occasion. Of course, mistakes will be made. But they must learnt from them and not repeat it again an again.

    “That, I cannot tolerate.”

    -----

    The cat is out of the bag!!!
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #71
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    Default NEWS : Kim Hock’s meteoric rise in just four years

    SOURCE : http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story...559&sec=sports

    The Star Online > Sports
    Saturday January 15, 2005
    Kim Hock’s meteoric rise in just four years

    BY RAJES PAUL KUALA LUMPUR: Yap Kim Hock has a habit of going places in a hurry.

    As a player, he got his first real top-class outing when he was paired with Cheah Soon Kit in 2000. Almost immediately, the pair won the World Grand Prix Finals, Asian Badminton Confederation (ABC) Championships and the Chiang Mai SEA Games gold medal, besides hitting the number one slot in the world rankings.

    Now, in just four short years, he has gone from a rookie coach to Malaysia's chief coach of the Project squad 2006-2008, which represents the country's elite badminton squad.

    And the small man is all excited about the big challenge that lies ahead of him.

    The 35-year-old, probably the youngest-ever Malaysian chief coach, asked for some time to settle down but said he was ready to shoulder the burden. As always, he was thinking of a quick leap to the top.

    “My squad will have to produce immediate results. I am aware of that,” he said. “But this is the challenge that I have taken upon myself. This is an opportunity to prove myself and I am confident that I can carry out my responsibilities well.”

    Under his charge, the Malaysian players are targeted at winning honours at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne (March), Thomas-Uber Cup Finals in Japan (May) and Doha Asian Games (Dec). The ultimate goal is to win a gold at the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

    “I am truly thankful to the BAM (Badminton Association of Malaysia) and NSC (National Sports Council) for giving me this opportunity. I promise to work hard,” he said.

    Kim Hock is known for his hardworking nature and never-say-die attitude. He was out with a shoulder injury in 1999 but came back to win a place in the Sydney Olympics. He quit just before the Games but came back for the sake of the country to play in Sydney.

    A second round defeat at Sydney finally ended his playing days and Kim Hock ventured into coaching.

    Again, his budding coaching career nearly went up in smoke when he was caught for drunk driving, just 10 months after he was appointed as the Bukit Jalil Sports School (BJSS) coach in March 2001.

    The BAM gave him a second chance and he has not put a foot wrong since.

    In 2002, Kim Hock won a promotion after helping Koo Kien Keat-Ong Soon Hock emerge as the Asian Junior champions. He was named as the doubles chief coach following the departure of South Korean Park Joo-bong.

    In his two years as the doubles chief coach, Kim Hock revived the career of veterans Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah, which saw them finishing as the All-England runner-up and winning their first Open title in five years at the Malaysian Open.

    At the same time, he managed to strengthen the national back-up squad, with players like Kien Keat, Soon Hock, Tan Bin Shen, Lin Woon Fui, Mohd Fairuzizuan Mohd Tazari, Mohd Zakry Abdul Latif and Jack Koh emerging.

    Kim Hock said his new and the biggest promotion yesterday would not hinder him from strengthening the men's doubles squad.

    “Being the chief coach is a new challenge but I do not think I will be so bogged down with work that I cannot focus on the men's doubles. I have been given assurance that I will have support. A manager will assist me.”



    ____

  4. #72
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    Default NEWS : ‘Mr Nice Guy’ ready to crack the whip in quest for success

    Source : http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story...983&sec=sports

    The Star Online > Sports
    Saturday January 15, 2005
    ‘Mr Nice Guy’ ready to crack the whip in quest for success

    KUALA LUMPUR: Rashid Sidek is quiet and soft-spoken. But never take that as a sign of weakness.

    The former top national player will not let anyone toy around with him when he takes charge as the chief coach of the Project squad 2010-2012.

    The 37-year-old has, in fact, vowed to be a strict disciplinarian.

    Yesterday, the Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) named Rashid as the chief coach of the Project 2010-2012 squad.

    His job is to whip up a solid team with the aim of winning honours for Malaysia in the 2010 Asian Games, 2010 Commonwealth Games, 2011 Thomas-Uber Cup, World Championships and ultimately the 2012 Olympic Games.

    Rashid is ready for the long-drawn challenge. And he believes discipline will be the key to success.

    “The beauty of coaching the youngsters is that I can have a hand in shaping their character.

    “The new players will be eager to prove themselves and I should not face any trouble keeping them in line,” said Rashid.

    “It is tough with the seniors. We cannot change some of their habits. With youngsters, I can mould them the way I want them to be.

    “My job is to ensure that there will be no lack of young talent to be promoted to the elite squad,” he said.

    Rashid said he would only select players who are committed and ready for full-time training.

    “I am looking at school leavers. Ideally, I would prefer players who have completed their studies at the BJSS (Bukit Jalil Sports School) and aged between 18 and 20,” he said.

    “I am looking at 20 players or fewer. It will be difficult if we have too many. I would rather have quality than quantity.”

    On his coaching abilities, Rashid said he had the experience of training under many coaches.

    “I am not a certified coach. My coaching ability comes from my experience. I have trained under Fang Kaixiang, Han Jian, Yang Yang, Chen Changjie and Dane Morten Frost Hansen.

    “All of these people have their styles and I have learnt things from them,”

    On the coaches he would appoint under his charge, Rashid said: “For now, (Teh) Seu Bok and Rosman (Razak) will be heading the men's singles and doubles respectively. I have a good working relationship with them. I will appoint others later. The main criteria is that these coaches must be able to work with me.”

    The coaches whose roles have not been determined after an BAM exco meeting yesterday are China's Zhou Kejian, Sun Chenhua (Bukit Jalil Sports School chief coach), Zhang Hongyu, Wong Tat Meng, Chang Kim Wai, Jeremy Gan, Koay Kar Lin and Mohd Salleh Suwandi.

  5. #73
    Regular Member jug8man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven
    Can anybody tell me what is Nusa Mashuri and why Nusa Mashuri is in Bam List
    what do you mean by "in Bam List"???

    if you mean why nusa players are representing BAM.... they are not. they are representing the country with permission from BAM to do so.

    also, nusa players are not the only one doing this. there are other players from various state BA's and 'clubs' that get to play in international events from time to time........... when they are financially able to do so.
    BAM is very receptive of this.
    i dont think any country would / should descourage such initiative to prove themselves / reach for their dreams.

    jug

  6. #74
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    From World Badminton.net:

    http://www.worldbadminton.net/Portal...10&ItemID=1748

    More infor on how the new system between the coaches is working. Looks so far like they have the best of everything- weekly meetups creating competition, but harmony during international tournaments.

    How can you copy text from Worldbadminton? it says the function is disabled for me.

  7. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesd20
    How can you copy text from Worldbadminton? it says the function is disabled for me.
    i don't think one can. isn't it like some sort of protection functtion to prevent reproduction of their material?

  8. #76
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    Bring back Indra Gunanwan, I see him as the best ever coach here.

    BAM should learn how to give more power to the coach...

  9. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by weeyet
    Bring back Indra Gunanwan, I see him as the best ever coach here.

    BAM should learn how to give more power to the coach...
    no need. we should only use our local coach

  10. #78
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    Default Greatest Strengths become greatest weakness

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun
    interesting point Loh.

    but it doesn't look like Misbun is in the position of the top leader. the BAM president, Datuk Nadzmi Mohd Salleh is the top leader of the team. Misbun is only the head singles coach who listens to the orders of the president.

    i have further thoughts on the organization structures that you mentioned.

    for a system that started off autocratic system. for it to grow and prosper, is it neccessary that it grows into a more democratic system like Singapore did?

    or would it be ok for it to stay autocratic? the Chinese team for example, if they continue to do well, would it hurt them if somebody continues to dictate all the rules?

    and the last thought is, what stage do we think BAM is in right now? will BAM benefit from a more autocratic system?

    actually, i think BAM *is* in an autocratic system. as mentioned, the President dictates. but it appears the leader is more cut off from the actual daily running of the team. i wonder how that works with LYB. he seems to be rather tightly tied to the training as well as leading.

    After studying different organizational structures and styles it is very rare that one system can evolve into another. This occurs because of two things

    1- the two main approaches/philosophies are usually polar opposities
    2- organizational culture forms and is difficult to change


    Usually you have two different ways to run an organization and "do business" so to speak.

    1 - operational - focuses on bottom line, implement what works,

    Strengths - very efficient, does what it does well, responds to known problems and situations quickly, produces results in short term

    Weaknesses - does not deal with uncertainty or new situation well, not as innovative, tends to resist change and new ideas. Can miss new trends and get blindsided

    2- strategic - longer term thinking, forward looking

    Strengths - anticipates changes and recognizes patterns, innovative, supports growth and exploration and recongizes areas for improvement

    Weaknesses - not always efficient, potentially less focused, longer to make tough decisons

    The two styles are very differnt and difficult to intermarry. To put into perspective it's like asking for a player who is both consistent, tough and also skilled and spontaneous or in other words a Yang Yang w/ Zhao Jian Hua skills. Similarily difficult to build/find one org that embodies both approaches.

    ORGANIZATIONAL culture - well that's the sticking point when u want to change or bring in new ideas. People are at the heart of every ORG. Simply put once u adopt an approach and set of ideas they start to stick. These habits and way of doing things = ORG culture. These are very difficult to break or change as u are talking about people. It takes alot of energy, effort and time and determination.

    So back to badminton - IMO

    China has an autocratic system - Disciplined, systematic approach to training and playing based on speed and power.

    Strengths are - clear lines of command, understanding of roles & responsiblites, Disputes are resolved quickly and decisively (not necessarily fairly). Focused and disciplined approach that produces effective and competive players who have high levels of mental and physical toughness.

    Weaknesses - more rigid, less room for the individual and variety most notable evidenced in the traditional weakness of mens doubles & less tolerance for dissentors ala Li Mao, .... , not always most effective - waste talent, high # injuries, slow to adapt/incorporate skills approach or strokes to training

    Malaysia - I will say more flexible and less autocratic system vs. strategic. Less defined roles and authority and produce a variety of players and styles. More open to discussion.

    Strengths - more flexible and accepting of individual styles, promotes variety in strokes and playing styles, more open to consensus potentially

    Weaknesses - Uncertainty in chain of command and responsbilities can result in confusion and disputes and politicking. Decison making and focus can be more indecisve and less focused. Confusing for players and coaches to determine roles and responsiblities w/o clear leader.

    So ... we see that the two systems are quite different and have their own strengths and weaknesses which are also opposites.

    My conclusion is that w/o more widespread change at the higher levels of the Malaysian system i.e. BAM, and other levels there won't be that much improvement. Making chages at the coaching level won't compensate or change the rest of the system enough to improve overall performance over long term. Li Mao alone cannot overcome the systems inherent weaknesses he needs help. Or put another way how is Li Mao so different from the other top flight badminton coaches before him that he'll revamp Malaysian badminton and make it stick. A strong leadership is needed to set the direction and guide the coaching, training and development - this is not the coaches role, but management's. Given the lack of transparency others have commented on I don't know if this is there but given the merry go round of coaches and compromises I don't believe it is.

    As for the Chinese system currently it's still the most effective "titles wise" but may get blindsided if it doesn't become more flexible and adopt more variety into it's training and approach to playing. It's tough to see some of that happenning as they are on top "blinded by success" and the talent pool is so large that they can afford to be wasteful of the coaching and playing talent. (Kind of like the superpowers in world politics ex. US, too big, too many resoources, slow to change)

    If Idonesia can marry the two systems watch out! Talent pool is there and w/ better organization and good leadership trouble!!

    I hope both Malaysia and China can change so that badminton evolves and grows further. I want to see a Yang Yang/Zhao player emerge soon as ulikely as it seems. Hope u found these "ramblings" interesting or useful.

    Derek

  11. #79
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    Default Sorry title is wrong

    Wrong title friends,

    Should be - The more things change the more the stay the same

    Li Mao needs help!

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