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Thread: Reducing Errors

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    Default Reducing Errors

    I remember a long time ago reading an article about reducing errors and I have searched my junk but never was able to find it.I will try to give you the details as I found it very valuable.Errors account for most players rally losses as opposed to absolute winners.The question being how does one reduce errors?

    One method is practice practice practice which is always good.Another method which was employed with great results by Morten Frost was to play safer shots when under pressure.When under pressure from a clear and you know your recovery back to the center is going to be late or jeopardized instead of hitting directly to the corner tight to the line hit to the middle of the half court high and deep.Chances are if you were to hit tight to the line while off balance you would either hit it out or be caught out of position trying to recover to your center base.The tight to the line return also gives you more extreme angles to contend with from the straight smash down the line or the crosscourt smash and this while off balance recovering does not play into your favor.

    The smash return is another area where errors creep up.If you are under pressure blocking tight to the corner these errors happen from trying to make the return too tight to the net or too close the line.Blocking the smash further back from the net and further away from the sideline makes the opponent take the shuttle from a vantage point where hitting a tight net return is harder and also makes the angles of returns easier to cover as well to the back court.

    Clears from the net can also be used to these areas when under pressure from an explosive attacking player who has the ability to make those down the line and xcourt smashes.This tactic was used by Morten Frost alot against an onslaught of opponents playing a more aggressive smashing game with the extreme angles.When Not under pressure he played his shots tighter to the lines but when things got more and more aggressive he would play safe returns and would play on the opponents making unforced errors Or play on their fitness waiting for his opportunities to present themselves.
    Last edited by bighook; 01-13-2005 at 02:15 AM.
    bighook

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    In tennis parlance it is called 'playing percentage tennis'. This means that you hit high percentage shots (not too fast, not too tight), esp under pressure, and let your opponents make the big shots as well as most of the mistakes. Be sure, however, that the high percentage shots that you make do not give your opponent a clear advantage by opening you up to easy attacks.

    When smashing or dropping against a side-side pair in doubs, hit between them rather than down the alleys. This is another way to play the percentages & put your opponents in a temporary state of confusion at the same time.

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    The following jpeg shows the principles I was talking about.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    bighook

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    This is an interesting thread as I (and a majority of everybody else) would then to make mistakes under pressure. Apologies bighook, I can't seem to read clearly the paragraphs that you typed. For example:

    "When under pressure from a clear and you know your recovery back to the center is going to be late or jeopardized instead of hitting directly to the corner tight to the line hit to the middle of the half court high and deep".

    Is there supposed to be a comma in there or something?
    I re-read a few times and I still don't know if you meant we should return it half court in the middle high and deep or did you forget to finish the sentence?

    Pardon my .

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    Sorry about that.Hit to the red areas of the jpeg.What I meant was if you take a half court from the center line to the sideline width wise .Hit to the middle of it deep in length between the singles and doubles backline.
    bighook

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    Quote Originally Posted by bighook
    The smash return is another area where errors creep up.If you are under pressure blocking tight to the corner these errors happen from trying to make the return too tight to the net or too close the line.Blocking the smash further back from the net and further away from the sideline makes the opponent take the shuttle from a vantage point where hitting a tight net return is harder and also makes the angles of returns easier to cover as well to the back court.
    .
    Another quality thread

    Smash returns for singles. If you go back more than twenty years ago, a simple block to the forecourt after receiving a smash would be a common shot. Nowadays, it's more rare. If the opponent is fast enough to follow up their smash at the forecourt, they could kill your block return.

    Alternatively, they could make a really good netshot.It's much easier to play tight net shots when the shuttle is met early and is very close to the net.

    Bigshot is advocating playing your defensive block return of the smash with a slightly flatter trajectory. The shuttle is played with a little more pace so that if left alone, the shuttle would land in the opponent's court past the service line.
    Why play the shuttle with more pace? Wouldn't the opponent reach it earlier?
    Well, yes! But strangely enough, there less tactical advantage given to the opponent. The opponent cannot meet the shuttle close to the net (so it is more difficult to play a good netshot). Also, it is more difficult to hit the shuttle steeply downwards for a net kill from behind the service line than in the forecourt area.
    These factors are in addition to covering the retunr of angles that bighook mentioned.

    This is excellent way of nullifying the opponents attack, frustrating him and making him lose his confidence in his smashes. That's why you see some defensive players beat the powerful, hard hitters of the shuttle.

    Not every smash can be returned in this way though. If you have to receive a steep smash (makes you stretch forward) that is very close to the sidelines, that is already a very good smash giving a big advanatge to the opponent. Be aware that it is extremely difficult for anybody to smash within 6 inches of the line in a tough game, throughout the whole match. That's where a strong defensive return causes your opponent to make mistakes, lose morale and eventually lose the match.

    If you don't believe me, watch some videos of Peter Gade in the late 90's when he had an incredible attack smashes. See how Sun Jun managed to counter it to gain victory over Peter in the 1999 Sudirman Cup final and the WGPF in 1998 (?).

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    eh but can some1 explain the picture properly because i dont really undertsand it.

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    When under pressure in the back court hit to the red areas in the back .
    When under pressure from the smash hit to the red areas in the forecourt.
    When not under pressure hit to the blue areas in both situations.
    When under extreme pressure from a hard smasher hit to the green areas in the backcourt.
    bighook

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    That's an interesting theory,

    But what would be the "under pressure" locations in doubles (both men and mixed)? 'Cause Morten Frost is a single player. This would perhaps help me in doubles games.

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    The thing is with doubles you want to concentrate on placement of quality doubles returns if you can when under pressure.You have to realize you are dealing with an attacker covering the back and an attacker covering the front.Moving them out of the position where they can continue to hit down becomes the goal.All too often I see players caught up in the pursuit of just returning without implementing any strategic shots towards turning the defence into the offence.I understand the fun behind the exhilaration of the speed but it does nothing towards winning unless your opponents are more prone to making errors on the offense.If you play tournaments you realize that energy conservation can be key to making it to the final.Play hard but play smart.Check out the thread smashing tactics where I left a diagram of quality doubles returns.
    bighook

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