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View Poll Results: where do you look when you serve?

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  • i look down at the birdie

    391 21.19%
  • i stare at my opponent

    572 31.00%
  • i look at where i am planning to hit

    420 22.76%
  • i look at empty space.

    221 11.98%
  • i look all over the place

    330 17.89%
  • other.

    205 11.11%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Results 137 to 153 of 387
  1. #137
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    I rarely look at the position where i plan to hit directly, i mostly scan the entire court on my opponent side and also look at my opponent directly. By looking at your opponent you can learn a lot about what they're prepared for and an idea as to how to attack. Once i have decided where to hit, i often just look at my opponent but focus on my peripheral vision to see where im going to hit. Sometimes i even look just above my opponent, further utilizing my peripheral vision. Looking at the opponent directly, i find is a distraction but i do it before is serve to get an idea as to where to hit, after that i look mainly above, or indirectly at my opponent.

  2. #138
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    I usually look at the shuttle in hand, Then if flick serving i just serve ,but if its a short serve the second i make eye contact i serve this puts the opposition hopefully on the back foot

  3. #139
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    i look at where i want to serve and at the net.

  4. #140
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    i always stare at the T whether i'm flick serving, serving wide or serving towards the T dont ask me why because i dont know i just do and some person will probally be proclaiming i'm doing somethnig horribly wrong but thats what i do and thats what i always intend to do

  5. #141
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    i stare at the opponent's court blankly.. I never let him/her know what I'm thinking..

  6. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by leprechaun
    1.look at oponent
    2.look at wherever iam going to place the shuttle (and look to see if he noticed that and then delibratly put it in a diffrent place)
    3.look at shuttle
    4.look at racket as i go to hit shuttle
    5.then follow shuttle to wherever it goes while getting ready to recive
    Ha, that's exactly what i do!

  7. #143
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    i look at attractive girls when i serve

  8. #144
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    i look at the bird then when i serve i will look at the line of the net i want it to just cross over and start heading downwards

  9. #145
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    I look at where the opponent is looking and then serve to where the opponenet isn't looking.

  10. #146
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    Default well..

    I definetly try not to look at the opponent. Because sometimes If we do that, our eyes will automatically look at the spot that we target to place out shuttlecock. So, mainly, I have thought about where I want to place it. And i look at the shuttlecock....

  11. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoolDoo6
    I look at where the opponent is looking and then serve to where the opponenet isn't looking.
    Surely the opponent will always be looking in the same direction: at the shuttle.

    By that principle, you would never play a straight low serve

  12. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    Surely the opponent will always be looking in the same direction: at the shuttle.

    By that principle, you would never play a straight low serve
    Very true, if they hog the service line, I flick the hell out of them. I am not afraid to use 15 straight flicks. No matter how stubbon they are, sooner or later they will start standing one step back. Then they start getting short serves so that they can rush it into the net or lift. Where they are looking is more than just their eyes. It is also their stance.

    I regard receivers standing at the front as looking forwards, standing at the back as looking backwards, and standing at the middle of the receiving court as trying to look all around. In the last case, one can check the recevier's legs and see which direction they can't go in a hurry.

  13. #149
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    Yes, it's very important to check the opponent's stance. However, a nice tactic that is especially useful against noobs and those that are too eager to attack is to delay the serve, instead holding your pose there, and if they start to waver or maybe even stumble forward (how embarrasing!), you can catch their intentions and break their focus. So don't immediately serve: analyze them first.

    Also, not only when serving, but also in general play, my old coach told me that you should be able to see as much of the court as possible, so you should note:

    1) Your own location (don't cross the line!)
    2) The bird
    3) The closest opponent
    4) The other opponent (if doubles)
    5) [sensing by sound or shadows]Your partner (if doubles). So try to focus on as much as possible. But the most
    important thing is to know where you are (you can check this easily and safely when serving, as you control when the rally starts), how your opponent is standing, and his partner's possible intentions.

  14. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoolDoo6
    I regard receivers standing at the front as looking forwards, standing at the back as looking backwards, and standing at the middle of the receiving court as trying to look all around. In the last case, one can check the recevier's legs and see which direction they can't go in a hurry.
    Yes, observing the receiver's stance and position is very useful for choosing your serve.

    Sometimes the position is deceptive, however. I know many players who stand at the front, but are "looking" backwards (they are more ready for the flick serve). If I use a flick serve, they can leap back and play a half-smash.

    But if I use a low serve, they don't attack effectively because they are "looking" backwards. So sometimes the intimidating stance of the receiver is just a bluff.

  15. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gollum
    But if I use a low serve, they don't attack effectively because they are "looking" backwards. So sometimes the intimidating stance of the receiver is just a bluff.
    I find few but the absolute best club players can spring back fast enough. Even if they make it back, their return is less than ideal half of the time, as more often than not they are forced to make a shot while their backs are slanting backwards at maybe 45 degrees.

    Whether they bluff it or not, the minute I detect backwards looking, they can have fun with my short serves, which are also highly variable and eventually will home in on their weakest spot, left, right, center of their stance, or anywhere in between.

    I find there's a great deal of psychology in the serve, and it's tremendously fun. Sometimes the serve would not only influence the receiver, but also his partner. I was flick serving this tall fat guy on every serve (he had a center of the court stance, but he had trouble dealing with his backwards momentum), and his short partner gradually moved farther and farther into the back, whom I did not flick serve to once. The farther back he moved, the less reason I had to flick him, and the more he had to run to retrieve the serve.

    A psychological curiorsity I found in some of the more experienced players was that after being persistently flicked, they start losing their undoubtably coached dicipline of sticking to the short serve, and tempted into revenge flicks. Of course, being far less practiced, their results were ineffective to say the least.
    Last edited by CoolDoo6; 11-02-2006 at 11:35 AM.

  16. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoolDoo6
    I find few but the absolute best club players can spring back fast enough. Even if they make it back, their return is less than ideal half of the time, as more often than not they are forced to make a shot while their backs are slanting backwards at maybe 45 degrees.
    I guess I must be playing some of the "absolute best" club players then

    It's not that hard to leap backwards and attack a flick serve, as long as you know that it's coming. Even if the flick serve is absolutely perfect, you still have good attacking chances.

    The real challenge is to be equally ready for all possible serves -- low, flick, drive, and all angles -- and still be able to play a strong return of serve.

    Like I said, I know several very good players whose aggressive receiving stance is actually a bluff, in the sense that they are not able to attack the low serve as well as they should be able to given their skill and forward receiving position. The reason for this is that they are mentally ready mainly for the flick serve, and therefore their return of low serve is an afterthought.

    So their (very slight) weakness is that they are not able to do all of the following three things at once:
    • Stand right at the front
    • Be completely mentally ready for the flick serve
    • Be completely mentally ready for the low serve
    By contrast, some weaker players, who stand farther back, actually have better low serve returns. This is because they are taking the pressure off their flick serve return and can therefore be more mentally ready for the low serve return. Their slight sacrifice in physical readiness for the low serve is more than compensated for by their improvement in mental readiness.

    In my case, I can generally stand at the front and be mentally ready for both flick and low serves. My problem is that I can't (yet) be mentally ready for drive serves as well. In a similar analysis as above, I cannot do all of the following four things at once:
    • Stand right at the front
    • Be completely mentally ready for the flick serve
    • Be completely mentally ready for the low serve
    • Be completely mentally ready for the drive serve
    So what I'm getting at here is that physical preparation and technical skill is only one part of a receiver's readiness. Often their mental readiness to cover all the options is less well developed than their physical readiness to respond to one particular option. This is why probing your opponents with service variations is so effective, compared to always playing the same serve.

    Of course, one of the ways of improving mental readiness is to improve technical skill, so that the required responses become ingrained and automatic. The obvious way to do this is to train each skill in isolation first until it can be performed with a good degree of success, and then introduce a gradually more challenging level of uncertainty into the practice.
    Last edited by Gollum; 11-02-2006 at 12:12 PM.

  17. #153
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    I stare into space, or at the net tape, whatever to call it..
    while I mgith say my serve is good (players 1-2 levels higher rarely kill it, and mostly just get a mediocre reply (not an immediate advantage to them, I mean) but my problem lies in variation, my flicks are good, but when I dó serve short they 9/10 times go at the exact same spot...whenthey see it's short they almost immediatly step there, i need mroe blending..

    abotu service returns..tall guys (= me) should have that much problem with flick serves (at least..I don't) Though my retrun of short serves is better, I can't pretty much reach any flick, and attack most..1-step intercepts are ym favorite

    I've seen some great serve-bluffers around here. one bloke stands with his right foot on the serve-line, but with his left so far back he couldn't possibly make a quick step forward/back...strangely enough it works for him..because his returns are great..another one is as tall as I am (6ft 2-3 I guess) stands right at the serve line, racket up, body weight forward (it seems) but already 'falling' back as you start your serve...

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