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  1. #1
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    Default Tired? Ever stopped? my experience.

    Hmm, I've been playing for over half my life and I still love it. There's so much to learn. I wish I could have learnt more when I was younger. I wasted a lot of time playing badminton and trying to selfimprove when I should have tried getting a coach(paying good money but saving time)

    Sometimes, badminton has had to take a backburner. In Uni, I still managed to play badminton for the Uni team, play football(soccer), go ten pin bowling.

    For the final year of Uni, I decided to stop badminton because the time of the sessions weren't flexible to fit around and ever changing final year Med school timetable. There was no way I could maintain the standard to continue in the team. The replacements were martial arts & ten pin bowling (easier to fit in my timetable)

    One day, I popped down to meet all the friends in the Uni session for a social chat. I saw them play with the shuttle flying back and forth. I suddenly realised how much I really missed badminton and what a great game it was. NO, not just great, it's a fantastic game.

    I decided to start playing again after graduating (and all those exams had gone). Wow, it was hard work. I'd lost that leg speed(though I was still seeing the shuttle pretty well). It took nearly a year of playing twice a week to start feeling my way back into the game properly.

    How hard was it to continue playing? Well, there was no time for any other sports as a working life puts a hell of lot of constraints on time. I had to choose and badminton was the winner.
    Plus, I was doing 70-80 hours per week at work. My record is a continuous shift from Fri morning 8am through Sat/Sun to Mon 7pm - 83 continuous hours. Uggh, I don't anybody to go through that. I went three years like that but still playing badminton. Even when I was dead beat not having any sleep the night before(from work), I'd still pull myself up, go and play badminton before collapsing in bed. At least I was still getting exercise (but not playing well!)

    It's amazing I've never stopped. That just shows you how bad a badminton fanatic I am

    So, some years later, I go through specialist training for my profession(still doing those overnight shifts and still playing badminton!) and more exams

    For my injuries, I had a bad hamstring strain (kept me out for 4 months), wrist pain (lasted 5 months), shoulder pain (niggling me for last 3 months), yet I never thought of giving up badminton.

    Now life is a bit easier - I can play more badminton (Yippee), can go to watch tournaments (even Japan!), learn more techniques, train routines. Even though I can't match the 16-20 year old guys on physical level, it still is a great feeling to practice, gain a skill, gain insight into the tactical application of the skill.

    One of the worst moments is during training. Since I got many old bad habits, it's difficult to change. Very frustrating not being able to do as the coach says. Sometimes I think of packing in the training. However, there's always something in the back of my mind saying 'keep going but on another day'.

    Other points about learning badminton from a good coach when ''older'':
    1) I went right back to basics - how to place the feet, balance, move to corners, recover, holding racquet, relaxing(vitally important). It was hard work (remember, I already played for >10years with so-so technique). But strong basics get you far - shaky foundations mean you can't get to the higher levels.
    2) Learning a new skill makes you worse! One step back and two steps forward. Unlearning is harder still. BUT, luckily, I can accept the temprorary drop in standard for long term improvement (and I have improved a lot)
    3) It can be unbelievably tough physically. I nearly vomited once but I really want to improve.

    Some of what I learnt I have put up on this discussion board for all of us to share. So far, only one person on this board seems to really understand my badminton training so I'm guess the level of training I'm getting is pretty good. (I also learn from these board discussions as well).

    Additional bonuses: I'm very fortunate to have met some International players, played(and lost) some excellent players.
    If somebody told me that I would sit on a coach next to former Olympic and current Olympic Champions a few years ago, well, I would have told them to stop 'pulling my leg'.

    CONCLUSIONS:
    1) I consider myself lucky to be have been able to play badminton for so long.
    2)Although winning is important, the fact that I can IMPROVE is just as equally satisfying.
    3) Especially for those college guys, I really hope you can continue to enjoy the game for as long I have even if time really seems at a premium or injuries affect you.
    4) Team matches are important for one season only. Although you may get angry at other teams/players for certain tactics, the next year, it doesn't matter. so go enjoy yourself and also keep an open mind to learning from the experience
    5) Accept sometimes you can't always play well. Don't get angry - most of the time it doesn't help (only certain characters can get angry and play better). On another day, you will be fantastic.

    ENJOY YOUR BADMINTON

  2. #2
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    Default Is THIS legal?

    Cheung, I do accept that we all get tired at times, but this needs clearing up.

    A few months ago I played in a local all-comers mixed doubles tournament. I was playing with my mother (young players - try this at your peril!). We were playing very well, and we got as far as the semi-finals, which is where the problem arose.

    The situation is thus - best of three games, first to 15 in each. We took the first game and were winning the second 14-12. The pair we were playing were very experienced and knew each other as well as my mother and I knew each other.

    The opposite lady was very resilient and tall, so I treated the couple as I would any men's pair, trying to grind them down with fast, central drops and pushes to the back.

    At 14-12, the match-winning point which may have taken us to the final, the opposite man asked to stop for a few minutes. This was also a very demanding game for me, so I took advantage of the break by lying down for a while...foolishly I didn't stretch, and my calves went numb. Subsequently, a combination of refined tactics on their part (possibly after a secret "time-out") and the sway of momentum in their favour turned the game around.

    They got to the final but lost to my friend and his partner. He picked up the trophy just this evening at a presentation. I would have loved to pit my wits against him - friends who have played for the same length time in the same circumstances carry a certain rivalry.

    What hit me tonight is how things could have been different. Although I treat the opposite semi-final pair with the greatest respect, I wonder what bearing the interval had on later events. At the time I condoned the interval, but gamesmanship may have played a part, which has led to my indecision.

    If a player is exhausted to the point of collapsing, is he or she allowed a break?

  3. #3
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    Not according to tournanment rules set by the IBF. There are specific rules regarding stoppage in play and the umpire is there to ensure that the time limit is adhered to.

    I am assuming that there was no umpire and since you agreed to the stoppage, you can't actually fault anyone else.

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    Default Re: Is THIS legal?

    Originally posted by Aleik
    Cheung, I do accept that we all get tired at times, but this needs clearing up.

    If a player is exhausted to the point of collapsing, is he or she allowed a break?
    Aleik, I think Cheung was talking about being "tired" from a broader perspective, as in ... life.

    In a game, if I feel exhausted to the point of collapsing, yes, I'd stop. I wouldn't want to die just because of a game.

    In life, no. I'd keep going to get what I aim for.

  5. #5
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    Cheung, I've also experienced something like this, however, it wasn't badminton, but in Track.

    Me myself is a sprinter (100m dashes) and was since gr 6. However, after grade 7 I decided not to join the track team in grade 8/9 which really killed my physique. In grade 10, in highschool, I decided to join again. For that level, the "standard" time was about 13 seconds which I was lacking (cuz I had no form and no physique) And the coach was brutal, ran practices everyday of the week. After the first week of practice which I kept up barely, I was dead tired, and basically slept thru the weekend (sataurday sunday in total I think I had about 40 hrs of sleep). Then comes the second week. After warmups and some simple techniques, comes "practice"

    What he calls practice is a bloody hell. For those of you who also run in track, you know there's no way to specialize in all the sprints, you either did one or two of the 3 events (100m/200m/400m) but you dont do all three.

    Practice consists of 5 times around the track.
    Sprint 100, jog 100, sprint 200, jog 200, sprint 400, jog 400, sprint 200, jog 200, sprint 100, jog 100. And all the sprint needed to be done within certain time limit he gives, or after the jog, he'll have you repeat that sprint. At the end of the practice when I was cooled down, I couldn't walk. Both Calf muscles were pulled, all around the legs the muscles felt like they were going to burst... and yes, I DID throw up, even though I've had nothing to eat since 4 hrs ago. And that was just day one

    After 3-4 days of that, I could not take it anymore, because the only thing I did at home was sleep, and in class I couldn't concentrate enough to listen to what the teacher was saying. Eventually my mom had me quit the team after two weeks of hell because I had trouble standing without my legs shaking...

    Most of the team members did not complain, because they run in track teams all throughout the year, and yah... for those who are wondering where u get a coach like that, he was an ex-olympian, and the group we had at our school had all been coached by him for the past 2-3 yrs.

    I went back the next year tho, hoping I would be more in shape... but then unfortunately I shattered my left collarbone in a trip when I was attempting a record breaking run (well... I wish... but... haha... I was goin pretty fast at the time... I'm just glad I didn't break my neck)... which hurt like hell... and had to wear some stupid supporter for the rest of the season (which realli sucked)

  6. #6
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    stopped? i guess i have been less fortunate than you Cheung, i fell in love with badminton when i was in form 1 (grade 7/sec 1). since my school was the least athletic in the whole city (it was kinda a nerdy school), we didn't have any real team or anything like that, so all i had was playing in the school yard during break and after school. i played on every opportunity, all break, lunch (skipped lunch) and after school. it was great, and i was completely hooked, but never really advanced. then after 3 yrs, left HK and joined another school for two years, no badminton. nothing, despite me bringing my rackets, i think i managed to play only 2-3 times during all those times. it was really sad. then i switch to a different school for upper sixth, that is when i started playing. the school had great facilities and there were even a team. i really enjoyed my time there playing badminton. but good time never last. i was there for one year and i had to leave for college.

    you guess it, my college had no badminton. no one even know what badminton is, and there was no courts and no players. for 4 yrs, i still brought my racket, hoping i may have a game, but still, none. i wasted 4 golden years without playing any badminton. my skills went down to nothing.

    then came graduate school, luckily, there were a good asian population and there were badminton, i was so hooked then. even if we had only one court, i will play from 6pm-midnight, and organizing games with friends for 3 days a week. it was a lot of badminton playing, but the level was quite poor. there wasn't much improvement though it was still there.

    then after 3 yrs, moved to CA. badminton is very popular here and i am in heaven. i haven't stopped playing, and i have been here for neary 4yrs now. it is still great time.

    but in various points in these few years, i have asked myself various times, "am i playing too much?" it is actually frustrating as the rate of improvement isn't that high. despite playing for so long, i don't see much improvements.

    and i have slowed down playing in various times in this period, it is kinda like a break, i will go biking instead of badminton, or i will take a rest and stay home. focusing on other things. i actually find that quite benefiting. once i took a month off and i went back and i was playing the best badminton of my life. it is really strange, but it feels like the break i took actually let me "digest" and absorb more.

    sometimes i find that intense focusing on something on a period of time actually blocks any improvement, i find that taking a short trip off will help. i guess that is kinda like life, if someone work too much and too intense for too long a time, one needs to take a vacation, and then comes back and you will find yourself much more productive than before. that gotta be true for badminton.

    typed too much. that's all folks.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for those experiences.

    Aleik, you had every right for play to continue. The other player was taking advantage of your lack of knowledge. The only way he could have taken a break was to claim an injury time out....better luck next time. Just put it down to experience.

  8. #8
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    Kwun,
    I've found the same thing - when you play badminton night and day, your brain starts getting sort of numb:-) an exception to this would be... if you had a coach to guide you all the time! then by playing all the time, there would be lots of improvement! I think someday I'll save up a lot of money... and stop working... and just be coached for a while until i run out of money... and then do it again.
    g

  9. #9
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    badminton is a thinking game. If you play to excess you will only play the same way.i found this,at one stage one year ago i used to play everyday for 3hours,with pretty much the same people.playing with the same people is also counter productive as you play the same way and when you come up against someone different it is difficult to cope with.If you play 3 times a week it is good,maybe 4!! this way you play and play hard to the best of your ability, driving home you can think about points won and lost (equally important) and games won and lost and think why.this will lead to improvement,eventually.however you need (i think) to have some general idea of the principles. with this your improvement increses exponentially.

    I played when i was 12-16 at the same place once a week and loved it i went from barely being able to hit it to what i now know is a smash one of the guys there had really only one shot,a drop shot.from this i began to copy him.i didnt have a clue there was tactics or footwork in the game at all.

    from 16-18 i went to a club which had several teams,my "smash" was quite good and i even played for the 2nd team near the end there.one of the players there was very good at attacking serves,so i copied him as well.i feel i learnt alot from this period,even though i didnt know what it was. i played twice a week and was mad keen.

    When i moved to uni i played twice a week for my first year and was quite poor and was enlightened to how good players can be.
    in my second year,for no real reason i took i by the throat and played virtually nonstop,bought "good quality" rackets andcrucially videos.from these i managed to see how top top playersworked and what they aimed to do.now i play with the uni coach although training is simply a few pointers here and ther within the last year i have improved more than can imagine and the rate is improving quicker as i understand things better.

    i believe now that playing with as many people as possible is best as it teaches you to adapt better.you should try play tournaments,as you meet new people and learn from better players.help people not as good as you,if you teach them well they can teach you just as much.donttell them the right way,there is no such thing,tell them your way and allow them to do what they can do.keep things simple,a player that finshes a point of when it is there to be had every time is better than an inconsistent player who can do flashy shots but falls on easier things

    have fun playing and i hope many more people can enjoy badminton as i have

  10. #10
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    For me, I had been playing badminton since I was at 4th grade in elementary school, but only play on the roads and never had the opportunity to taste the courts. And my first racquet I had was the only racquet I had until my first year in the undergraduate. I still remember it being an old Yonex racquet with the steel frame and the T joint.

    Then came my junior high school. It was at the 2nd year that I started going to the club and play badminton at the court. We just play, no training whatsoever, My grip was still panhandle at the time and I just run scrambling to get every shot and hit it. No positioning, no front-rear or rear.

    But I was glad, That was the time I first time I developed my backhand service and some hitting action. Eventually I stopped going because we had to pay and I can't do that and I'm shy for asking it to my parents, besides, the 3rd year is a preparation to go to the senior high school.

    at the senior high school, pretty much I stopped playing badminton. I was into football at that time.

    And then came the university years, I pretty much started Badminton again after a stop for 3 years, this was partly because I wasn't cut enough for football (I had athma and some allergy) and felt football took much of my time without me improving.

    At the 2nd semester, I took Badminton as my course and begun playing again. I still felt I haven't improved much from the course, But I was happy I get to play badminton at university.

    I also started going out with my friends in my complex, playing badminton every friday night. That was the first time I was taught the shakehand grip, playing side by side and front rear. There was also a friend i know that sucked at football but is ridiculously good at badminton, those net shots, placing, clears smashes, are so damn good, and he;s so fat! There was also another player who was 2-3 level above all of us, to the point he serves high between his feet.

    This was my first real touch with badminton, I learned to play high clears and place them where I wanted to, I also then knew about the basic grip, but I can't apply it, as my shots always go the sides and out whenever I use it. My grip was pretty much a panhandle grip. And these were the "darker" days when I pretty was forced to be the front player and just kill the weak replies while the good players play at the rear.

    But I had something, now my clears are pretty strong and can reach the back, and I learned I can jump to reach higher. that was when I managed to defeat a better player by forcing him into a clearing game (in doubles). I also had better stamina than most of the players as I like to run and walk long distances because it was said to be good for my Asthma. I always chase and lift or lift high pretty much everything. the smashes, the drops, the drives, because that is what I was good at and make it into an endurance game. playing clears to the corners and watch the others run corner to corner catching their breath is a great pleasure to me. especially if they are better players than me.

    One thing that still amazes me is, I can't smash hard with my forehand, I can only do some good placement. but it's different for my backhand. My backhands were quite strong, and I can smash with them. I always think, in those days, my backhand were actually more powerfull than my forehand.

    I also had my first online community in Badminton, joining an onlne group called rileks in my university and played Badminton with them. I pretty much played the same.

    My real chancge was when I continued my study in Taiwan. With a very fast internet connection, eveything is possible. At my early days, I still play the same, but then I notice how the taiwanese and the vietnamese play differently, have better tactics, have good shot choice and placement and how their positioning is better.

    ofcourse, the Indonesians here have better skills, but most are erratic, what's better is their instincts, smashes and net play. but that was what made me thinking, why the much better players lost to the inferior players.

    These were my observations:
    1. Indonesians rarely cover the front court when their partner smashes
    2. less patient
    3. Can't get out when the opponent is already doing a front-rear formation and attacking by drop and smashes.
    4. less emphasis on formations, just move freely at will.

    Me myself that loves to lift and clear found myself at trouble as it is smashed or dropped. and I can't find an opportunity to attack.

    That was my second biggest change, I downloaded instructions, books, youtube videos, etc. to improve my badminton. I particularly say thanks to LJB videos, jimmy lin and the badminton bible.

    I improved,
    1. My footwork improved just by staying on the balls of my feet, my defense is better and can get to the place I wanted faster.
    2. Forcing myself to change from the panhandle to the basic grip. my form initially suffered, but then there was a vast improvement. I can now hit shots that I can't do before and hit in the areas that was impossible for me.
    3. Better positioning and formation. I just remember: If we lift, side by side, If the enemy lift, front-rear.

    That was when my game improved so fast, What I had done in 1.5 years means much more than what I had done since my elementary school days up into my undergraduate years.

    I continued learning from the internet, even untill now.

    I also had some sterotypes when playing there:
    1. Against Indonesian players, make the smash and then make a weak reply into the front of the net, I usually get's you points, as Indonesian rarely cover the front when the other pair is smashing
    2. Vietnames always play drops, so be patient, lift side by side or push it to the side midcourt.
    3. Taiwanese are too stiff in their formation, if you make them run around and break their formation by making unconventional shots, they scramble.
    hehehe

    I love playing with taiwanese and vietnamese as their tactics and positioning is more refined. You can always count they will cover the front court when you are doing smashes or drops, and they will drop and smash when you're attacking and you're at the front, not playing a clears when they should be smashing like many Indonesian players, making me hurry going into side-side formation before a smash come.

    and those years at taiwan are my foundation of me now. even when I came back to Indonesia, I keep improving, I can now stand toe to toe with the better players I once thought were much better than me, some are even defeated easily.

    I still remember those years, Playing at the hall, at the riverside at Yong-he, or when told what I should do.

    So from my experience, having lesser shots, less technique, bad swing, etc can be overcome by tactics, positioning and footwork. Your opponent may have better shots than you, but you have better legs, a better brain and know -how.

  11. #11
    Regular Member TeddyC's Avatar
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    ( ○.○)
    Omg...this is an eleven-yrs-old thread!! Someone must have too much free time...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeddyC View Post
    ( ○.○)
    Omg...this is an eleven-yrs-old thread!! Someone must have too much free time...
    It's nice to tell eveyone your experience with Badminton

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