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    Default Drop short from rear court

    Recently, 2 different groups of players told me that if I do a drop shot from the rear court when playing double, I should be the one going to the net quickly because my partner does not know that I do a drop shot. However, I always think that my partner should cover the net because (i) we probably are in the front/back formation if I can do a drop shot from the back and (ii) it is very difficult for me to rush to the net from the rear court after doing a drop shot. Please help to share your experience. If I am correct, are there any special situations that I should go to the net after doing a drop shot from the back?

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    In my experience, if you drop from the back, you should be prepared to rush forward. The reason is that, like you said, your partner will be the last on the court to know you dropped. His/her first indication of your shot would be the movement of your opponents.

    If your drop shot was good, your opponent cannot rush to the net to kill it. Therefore your partner is able to stay at the front (since your drop is good and below the net by the time opponent reaches, forcing a lift).

    If your drop is not good, your partner will see the opponent rushing forward to net kill. Your partner will have no choice but to try and rotate out in order to stand a chance with defending what would probably be a smash in the face. If your partner decides to rotate, they are always correct and you should rotate to sides also.

    The problem comes when some people think their drop shots are good (but are not, and used at inappropriate times), then tells their partner to "stay front". This happens so often at my university club but guys dont realise they should not dropped in the first place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arrowken View Post
    If your drop is not good, your partner will see the opponent rushing forward to net kill. Your partner will have no choice but to try and rotate out in order to stand a chance with defending what would probably be a smash in the face. If your partner decides to rotate, they are always correct and you should rotate to sides also.
    By then it's probably too late to rotate to sides.

    When I'm in the front and my partner covers the back, if I see the bird goes high to opponents' back court, I retreat to my closest side; otherwise I stay in the front.

    The one situation/exception I learnt from this site is, when the opponents are lifting to alternating corners, thus tiring out my partner, it is then when my partner drops from the backhand side, he should run up to cover the front and I switch to cover the back. But this requires proper communication and coordination.
    Last edited by kaki!; 11-10-2015 at 07:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterPanPan View Post
    Recently, 2 different groups of players told me that if I do a drop shot from the rear court when playing double, I should be the one going to the net quickly because my partner does not know that I do a drop shot. However, I always think that my partner should cover the net because (i) we probably are in the front/back formation if I can do a drop shot from the back and (ii) it is very difficult for me to rush to the net from the rear court after doing a drop shot. Please help to share your experience. If I am correct, are there any special situations that I should go to the net after doing a drop shot from the back?
    If you have the shot lifted to you at the rear court, you can play a smash or a drop. In either scenario, your partner comes to the front of the court. If he isn't, then this is the problem. You can help by playing the smash or drop down the centre line of the court.

    However, you must be playing a decent quality dropshot. Not one that goes across the net 6 feet above the tape!

    You are probably playing with people who don't have much experience of competitions.
    Last edited by Cheung; 11-10-2015 at 09:05 PM.

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    Wow... have I been playing incorrectly all these years?
    If your side is defending, whoever blocks to front court area should follow up to occupy the front. Both you and your partner are at roughly the same distance, but you know about your shot first.
    If you play a drop from a decent depth, your partner would find that out by watching the other side and react. As he's much closer to the net, he's in a better position to cover that, and should move forward/towards the placed shot.

    The only time you come forward is if you smash from mid-court. Then you follow your attack forward.

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    Assuming we are not talking about beginners here and MD, drop shot will mean front/back attack formation I guess.

    If so, the only time ever the front player should retreat is when the back player clears, which should be minimal

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    In order to understand double rotation in badminton, one only has to watch few woman doube matches on BWF TV. Rarely or never saw the player from the back ran to the front after a drop shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by latecomer View Post
    In order to understand double rotation in badminton, one only has to watch few woman doube matches on BWF TV. Rarely or never saw the player from the back ran to the front after a drop shot.
    It comes down to the quality of the drop shot and when its used. For pros, this is not an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    If you have the shot lifted to you at the rear court, you can play a smash or a drop. In either scenario, your partner comes to the front of the court
    Yup, that's what should happen in most of the cases. You're in attacking position, so your partner moves to the net to put pressure on your opponents' return.

    Quote Originally Posted by raymond View Post
    If you play a drop from a decent depth, your partner would find that out by watching the other side and react.[
    It should even be automatic. Opponents clear -> whoever is going to get it should attack and the other covers the net for pressure. You can then adapt your position depending on what the guy at the back does, but that's for more advanced players

    The only time you come forward is if you smash from mid-court. Then you follow your attack forward.
    Yup, that's one of the exceptions, but probably best left for when you are comfortable with the basic front / back positioning.
    There are quite a few rotation tricks and techniques that you can (and should) use at a higher level to let both players attack and avoid arm exhaustion, but it's usually something you can ignore until you grokk MD positioning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by latecomer View Post
    In order to understand double rotation in badminton, one only has to watch few woman doube matches on BWF TV. Rarely or never saw the player from the back ran to the front after a drop shot.
    yeah, thats right

    the only time when u drop and run to the front is when u have been raining smashes at the back but it kept returning (doesnt work), u are tired and wanna rotate to the front when ur partner moving to the back to smash

    but this involves great deal of chemistry between the 2 (LYD/YYS totally exemplifies this attack rotation) on when should the rotation start and requires good quality initial drops/drop smash/drive/block to keep the attack going

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arrowken View Post
    It comes down to the quality of the drop shot and when its used. For pros, this is not an issue.
    If the quality of the drop shot is not good, then it is not a drop shot. No need to discuss further.

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    Quote Originally Posted by latecomer View Post
    If the quality of the drop shot is not good, then it is not a drop shot. No need to discuss further.
    better duck under the net real quick if ur partner "sets u up" like this
    =P

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    Quote Originally Posted by junclot View Post
    better duck under the net real quick if ur partner "sets u up" like this
    =P
    Run to the front and eat the birdie yourself.

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    I agree that when a drop shot is made from the rear court it is difficult for players to rush to the forecourt. Quality of drop shot is very critical for its success. When a shuttle is lifted partner in the front or middle needs to be anticipating a smash, drop or clear shot from their partner and the moment they know that a drop shot is played need to get prepared for the return as well. When I am playing in the front and my partner is putting a drop shot I generally anticipate one of the three shots i.e. smash/drop/clear and accordingly position myself for the return

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    This seems like an odd discussion.

    If I play a drop shot from the back of the court, and my partner expects me to run to the net and cover it as well, then WHAT THE HELL is my partner doing? If they want me to play singles then get out of the court and leave me to it.

    Its easy for the guy at the net to tell if his partner played a drop shot. Its the sound. If he hears a booming sound, its a smash or a clear. If he hears nothing much, its a drop or a leave because the shuttle is going out. Regardless, the net player should be READY. The net player has PLENTY of time to decide what to do - they stand ready for a smash (which means hey are already in the mid court) and if its a drop shot they take a few steps forwards to threaten the net. Its really not that complicated.

    What about if someone plays a bad drop shot? should they be moving forwards to cover the net. No. Absolutely not. They need to stop playing terrible shots. Rushing forwards isn't going to help the situation - you have already lost the point!

    Special situations that are exceptions? Mixed doubles, where the lady is playing her second overhead from the back of the court (but not the first one). If she played a drop shot on this second overhead, she should come forwards and switch positions with her male partner, so they achieve the optimal attacking formation.

    This is a weird thread!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    This seems like an odd discussion.

    If I play a drop shot from the back of the court, and my partner expects me to run to the net and cover it as well, then WHAT THE HELL is my partner doing? If they want me to play singles then get out of the court and leave me to it.

    Its easy for the guy at the net to tell if his partner played a drop shot. Its the sound. If he hears a booming sound, its a smash or a clear. If he hears nothing much, its a drop or a leave because the shuttle is going out. Regardless, the net player should be READY. The net player has PLENTY of time to decide what to do - they stand ready for a smash (which means hey are already in the mid court) and if its a drop shot they take a few steps forwards to threaten the net. Its really not that complicated.

    What about if someone plays a bad drop shot? should they be moving forwards to cover the net. No. Absolutely not. They need to stop playing terrible shots. Rushing forwards isn't going to help the situation - you have already lost the point!

    Special situations that are exceptions? Mixed doubles, where the lady is playing her second overhead from the back of the court (but not the first one). If she played a drop shot on this second overhead, she should come forwards and switch positions with her male partner, so they achieve the optimal attacking formation.

    This is a weird thread!
    Hence my suggestion

    You are probably playing with people who don't have much experience of competitions.

    I did play a game like this.

    Each time I was cleared to, I hit a smash or a drop from the back of the court. My partner (who could run) stayed absolutely rooted to the his spot and never attempted to run to the net for the next shot. This happened for about 6 points (of course losing the points) - I mean, it's bl***y obvious it is his area to cover. Eventually, I couldn't contain myself and shouted out "yours" the next time. He wasn't pleased.

    Usually, I am very nice but this was just something else!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cheung View Post
    Eventually, I couldn't contain myself and shouted out "yours" the next time. He wasn't pleased.

    Usually, I am very nice but this was just something else!
    Yes, your suggestions were spot on. And I sympathise - I have played games like that too. I just cover it all anyway.

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