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  1. #18
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mater View Post
    In Singles, definitely, but in Doubles, it can lead to some confusion and hesitation especially if one plays with a variety of partners. I'm a left handed player so I see it first hand too much unfortunately, although, it's great when my partner's also left handed.
    I'd say in singles, it's easier to play against a lefty. Whereas in doubles you have to keep track of the lefty and right opponents, to make sure you're not placing the shot or return on a forehand side. That's why there are so many top left right combos in doubles.

  2. #19
    Regular Member visor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I must confess, I always find it a little bit weird when people say things like this. The reason I think its weird, is it doesn't matter whether my partner is left or right handed, it doesn't change who goes for what or who takes what. If a shot comes down the middle (e.g. a smash comes towards the middle), then the person who is cross court takes it, regardless of who is backhand or forehand or anything else. This is the same for any level of play.

    If a lift goes up the middle, then the closest player goes for the shuttle, regardless of which hand they play with. Or, if you prefer, the strongest rear court player goes back for it, regardless of which hand they play with.

    So you see, in doubles, it doesn't matter who my partner is or how they play, the rules are the same, and the rules don't rely on someone taking shots forehand or backhand.

    Just a thought

    For those considering which hand to learn with... do 10,000 perfect repetitions of each shot with your chosen hand, and you won't care which one you picked. It will be damned good at all the shots.

    Good luck!
    It's now your own partner I'm referring to being lefty, but your opponents. Playing against left right combo opponents require more concentration in placing shots and an adjustment in tactics.

  3. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I must confess, I always find it a little bit weird when people say things like this. The reason I think its weird, is it doesn't matter whether my partner is left or right handed, it doesn't change who goes for what or who takes what. If a shot comes down the middle (e.g. a smash comes towards the middle), then the person who is cross court takes it, regardless of who is backhand or forehand or anything else. This is the same for any level of play.

    If a lift goes up the middle, then the closest player goes for the shuttle, regardless of which hand they play with. Or, if you prefer, the strongest rear court player goes back for it, regardless of which hand they play with.

    So you see, in doubles, it doesn't matter who my partner is or how they play, the rules are the same, and the rules don't rely on someone taking shots forehand or backhand.

    Just a thought
    I guess you're right for the most part, in our games, the stronger rear player usually handles the lift in the middle, but in a fast game, for me, it's not so clear cut for drives/smashes down the center.

    In defensive positions with left / right players holding rackets on the outsides of the court, fast shots down the middle of the court is harder than say with both partners with same hand, right/right or left/left.

    Being a rec player, it's something I have not practiced consistently enough (smash in middle handled by cross court player). Sure there are games where this happens, but also are the cases where in case of down the middle, the forehand player commonly takes it.

    Granted, I don't have the experience and years compared to many others. I play in a club ranging from teens to players in their 50s and will typically have different 3-5 partners in a night. Some players that have little knowledge in rotation and positioning to ones that have great knowledge of that and shot selection and placement. Some willing to learn, others not so much.

    So there are games where my partner and I are in sync and games where a new partner and I are totally out of sync.

    Do you have more info on that rule regarding who takes the smash down the middle, regardless of forehand/backhand? I don't have formal training so I want to "have a look".

  4. #21
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by manduki View Post
    I heard that each person has a sport or such that they use their opposite hand. For me, its snowboarding (my left foot goes first even though im right handed) and I've seen lefties playing golf, ping pong, and such with their right hand. All these people were excellent and it shouldn't affect ur playing (perhaps other than the fact that your arm may tire faster).
    you got it, i am a complete lefty, but i play golf as a righthanded person, it just feels natural. i once tried to swing like a lefty, AWKWARD! i also play the violin and the guitar as a righty :P

  5. #22
    Regular Member gundamzaku's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSeeley View Post
    I must confess, I always find it a little bit weird when people say things like this. The reason I think its weird, is it doesn't matter whether my partner is left or right handed, it doesn't change who goes for what or who takes what. If a shot comes down the middle (e.g. a smash comes towards the middle), then the person who is cross court takes it, regardless of who is backhand or forehand or anything else. This is the same for any level of play.

    If a lift goes up the middle, then the closest player goes for the shuttle, regardless of which hand they play with. Or, if you prefer, the strongest rear court player goes back for it, regardless of which hand they play with.

    So you see, in doubles, it doesn't matter who my partner is or how they play, the rules are the same, and the rules don't rely on someone taking shots forehand or backhand.

    Just a thought

    For those considering which hand to learn with... do 10,000 perfect repetitions of each shot with your chosen hand, and you won't care which one you picked. It will be damned good at all the shots.

    Good luck!
    i agree if that rotation is executed well, it won't matter. personally for me, after going thru a full roatation, would have forgotten whether my partner's lefty or righty.

  6. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mater View Post
    I guess you're right for the most part, in our games, the stronger rear player usually handles the lift in the middle, but in a fast game, for me, it's not so clear cut for drives/smashes down the center.

    In defensive positions with left / right players holding rackets on the outsides of the court, fast shots down the middle of the court is harder than say with both partners with same hand, right/right or left/left.

    Being a rec player, it's something I have not practiced consistently enough (smash in middle handled by cross court player). Sure there are games where this happens, but also are the cases where in case of down the middle, the forehand player commonly takes it.

    Granted, I don't have the experience and years compared to many others. I play in a club ranging from teens to players in their 50s and will typically have different 3-5 partners in a night. Some players that have little knowledge in rotation and positioning to ones that have great knowledge of that and shot selection and placement. Some willing to learn, others not so much.

    So there are games where my partner and I are in sync and games where a new partner and I are totally out of sync.

    Do you have more info on that rule regarding who takes the smash down the middle, regardless of forehand/backhand? I don't have formal training so I want to "have a look".
    Happy to explain... In doubles, when you lift the shuttle, you should be lifting to one of the corners. This protects you from a big smash down the middle of the court, which would come in between the players. If you lift down the side of the court, then both players should be standing slightly closer to that side than before. This means that the "straight" defender stands a little closer to the tramlines, whilst the "cross court" defender should be standing a little further forwards than the straight defender, and will be very close to the middle line. In this way, you have got the straight (most dangerous) smashes covered, but both players are equidistant from the opponent who is about to play a smash. This means a larger gap is being left cross court, but then again a cross court smash will take longer to arrive, and is tactically much riskier anyway.

    Thus, if your opponent tries to smash "down the middle", it will actually be going towards the cross court defender, who is stood near the middle. The cross court defender can then play a "straight" defensive shot, into the open space. Thus, from a tactical point of view it makes sense for the cross court defender to take any shots that come down the middle, as they can more easily defend into the open gaps of the court.

    So, in all of this, I haven't mentioned whether each player is left or right handed, because it doesn't matter.

    Now, things become much more difficult if you lift down the middle. Now the opposing team can smash straight, down the middle of the court, and there is no cross court defender to protect against this smash. Which is why you should never lift down the middle.

    Thus, if you hit your shots to the sides (not the middle), then the shuttle will always be coming towards one player or the other, and that player should take the shot! It didn't matter who was left or right handed! Its all about positioning so that shots come to you, rather than into gaps in your formation.

    As a result of all of this, the scenarios like hitting shots down the centre of the court to expose left/right handers is fairly pointless. The only time it will be difficult for them is if they have already done something that would have been stupid regardless of what partner they played with.

    Hope that explains it!

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