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  1. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcll99 View Post
    for really old ones (eg, for more 2 years), the rubber sole had hardened. There is not much you can do to save them.
    Oh no when I say old shoes I mean ones that I've used for a few months and basically lost their grip

  2. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boggieeiggob View Post
    Oh no when I say old shoes I mean ones that I've used for a few months and basically lost their grip
    Ok, you should do wash them with soap and rub them against PVC door mat.

    You should not wear your badminton shoes outdoor.

  3. #37
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    Hey i want to guide me what racket should i choose between arc fb arc zslash...see i ve aggressive player style but this week i understood that smash is not the only effective hit in badminton so...i m trying to change my style of game,but this doesn t mean that it is not an advantange to be a heavy smasher.My point is i want to use more technic and less smashes but when it comes the time to smah,use this benefit.

  4. #38
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    Good post. organized and well thought through.
    I have a query about which is the better racket between
    1. Muscle power 700
    2. Voltric 3
    3. Nanospeed 33, 66
    4. Arc Saber 001

    My game is mostly smashing and baseline shots and also drop shots close to the net from the last box or far back of the court.

    Also, are there any cheaper alternatives to any of these?

    I'm based in NY, USA - where badminton is a very niche sport - which only asian people know about.
    Any help and advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  5. #39
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    They're both very fast racquets but I find that z slash feels smoother when you play shots. I would personally say z slash because it lends power to you on smashes but it's not a slow racquet when it comes to defence either and because it's even, it fairs well at drives and drops. The arc fb is the same except because of the lack of weight, and hence momentum, to generate power, some people might find it hard to compensate for the missing power. But really, if your technique is good enough and your swing speed is fast enough (if you struggle with that I recommend using a training racquet, which ranges from 140g-180g) then that shouldn't be a problem

  6. #40
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    Errr... I don't know much about the lower end and not much at all about muscle power in general (I didn't even know MP700 existed <_>') but based on the series listed, I think either Arcsaber001 or Nanospeed (don't know which one, sorry) will be your best bet because Arcsaber is considered an all-rounder racquet so it will help you everywhere and nanospeed you generally just get a very fast response so good swing speed in overhead shots and the precision for net shots. But in terms of smashing, it's all down to practice really. I have two friends; 1 uses Arc10 and the other NS9900 and they can both smash just as hard as each other even though theoretically ns9900 is supposed to be a bit weaker in smashes than arc10

  7. #41
    Regular Member chris-ccc's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Badminton Central Guide to choosing Badminton Equipment

    Quote Originally Posted by kwun View Post
    Badminton Central Guide to choosing Badminton Equipment

    I have wanted to write a guide on what equipment badminton should focus on. By nature, badminton requires the player to have a few pieces of equipment to engage in the sports, items such as a racket and a shuttlecock are a must for a badminton player. However, often I see many player places the wrong focus on how they spend their money on equipment. A smart badminton player will spend money effectively to maximize their badminton playing experience.

    However, before I start, I would like to point out that no badminton equipment can replace proper badminton skills. If you think you can spend US$200 on a racket and you can instantly play better, you are 105% wrong. A good set of equipment can only bring out the potential of a player with good skills. No equipment can fix your bad skills. Instead, I recommend you spend your money on some good coaching lessons. It will make much more difference in your badminton game than a shiny new racket.

    String

    Recommended tensions: beginners: 19-20lbs . intermediate players: 21-24lbs. advance players: 25+ lbs.
    .
    I like what kwun has posted in this thread (in the opening post- Post #1).

    As one of BC's professional coach, I would like to comment on the string tension (as kwun has informed us).

    IMHO, most of our BCers have often over-rated our skill-levels; And therefore, choosing higher tensions for our strings.

    I would suggest that BCers to try the medium string tension first (which is ranging from 21 to 24 lbs). Only when we can hit consistently from our strings' sweet-spot (centre of the string-bed), then we can move up to higher string tensions.

    If we are consistently hitting missing the sweet-spot, then it's best to move down to the lower string tensions (ranging from 18 to 20 lbs).
    .
    Last edited by chris-ccc; 07-16-2013 at 04:02 AM.

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    I second that Chris!!

    After taking 15 years off badminton, I've started to play again this season. I was surprised how much tensions had increased while I was away. Both for top players and club-level players.

    I understand that the rackets can take much more punishment now than 15-20 years ago, where everything above 10kg would put the racket at risk (of course depending on the racket quality and state). But I also see a tendency among non-top-level players that higher tensions is the way to go.

    It's more or less the same that was going on with golf shafts 10-15 years ago. People opted for too stiff shafts because that was what all the pros were using. (I used to be an assistent golf pro).

    Now, when I rebooted my badminton life, I went and bought a VT70 racket (from a shop in Denmark that caters for a very high percentage of the top players in Copenhagen), and the stringer was surprised that I asked for no more than 11,5 kg. (I initially asked for 10,5 which was my old tension, but he suggested that most VT70 users was going for 12 kg, and that he himself played at 13 kg.). We settled at 11,5 kg. for me to test (he actually borrowed me a LiNing N90 strung at 13 kg. to try out, before deciding - I found it too hard, due to having more mishits than I used to, after 15 years off.

    Now, I see lower level club players at my club, and juniors as well, going for tensions above 10kg, and I really cannot see how on earth that would help them at all. They'll just get worse off in a lot of situations, and in very few situations they will benefit, but due to their level these benefits are not that big (added control on some shots is not worth too much, if you don't hit the shuttle very consistently to begin with).

    I think this is due to two things:
    One is hype. Hard is better. All good players go for hard tensions, if you yield a racket with a hard tension, you send the message "I'm good".
    The other reason is self-deception. Coming mostly from the sounds of the strings/racket, when hitting it dead center. We know that a hard strung racket sounds better when hit with a crisp shot. And that will trick people into feeling that the shot is harder and/or more precise. By generating the same sound as the pro's (or something more close to it anyway), you think you're hitting the shuttle better. Even though you don't get more speed! Then if you hit 40% of your shots bang on with a hard tensioned racket, you remember those hits, instead of maybe getting 60% good shots from a lesser tensioned string, that doesn't ring a bell or sound like thunder when you hit it. People would often opt for the few good shots, rather than the more consistent but less convincing sounding shots, telling themselves that they "can manage" this tension.

    It's their problem really. I'll just have an easier time beating them. But I don't understand why it has come to this for so many players. In badminton people don't seek advice from a coach or pro on equipment as they do in golf. Maybe that's the reason.

    PS: I used to play at a high level, and I was also a paid coach myself 20 years ago. So I can still move the shuttle decent around the court. I play only feathers, and my comments are only aimed at feather players (I think for plastic you should go even less tension). I'm currently playing bg-80 string, so that's my reference.

  9. #43
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    Sorry for replying to such an old post, I didn't notice the thread was inactive... :-)

  10. #44
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    A good resurrection though.

    Like you, I too love to play against players who play with tensions higher than they can handle. Makes my life so much easier.

  11. #45
    Administrator kwun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FeatherBlaster View Post
    Sorry for replying to such an old post, I didn't notice the thread was inactive... :-)
    late is not a problem. i enjoyed reading your post and your viewpoint and experience. which i totally agree.

  12. #46
    Regular Member Cycril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FeatherBlaster View Post
    I second that Chris!!

    After taking 15 years off badminton, I've started to play again this season. I was surprised how much tensions had increased while I was away. Both for top players and club-level players.

    I understand that the rackets can take much more punishment now than 15-20 years ago, where everything above 10kg would put the racket at risk (of course depending on the racket quality and state). But I also see a tendency among non-top-level players that higher tensions is the way to go.

    It's more or less the same that was going on with golf shafts 10-15 years ago. People opted for too stiff shafts because that was what all the pros were using. (I used to be an assistent golf pro).

    Now, when I rebooted my badminton life, I went and bought a VT70 racket (from a shop in Denmark that caters for a very high percentage of the top players in Copenhagen), and the stringer was surprised that I asked for no more than 11,5 kg. (I initially asked for 10,5 which was my old tension, but he suggested that most VT70 users was going for 12 kg, and that he himself played at 13 kg.). We settled at 11,5 kg. for me to test (he actually borrowed me a LiNing N90 strung at 13 kg. to try out, before deciding - I found it too hard, due to having more mishits than I used to, after 15 years off.

    Now, I see lower level club players at my club, and juniors as well, going for tensions above 10kg, and I really cannot see how on earth that would help them at all. They'll just get worse off in a lot of situations, and in very few situations they will benefit, but due to their level these benefits are not that big (added control on some shots is not worth too much, if you don't hit the shuttle very consistently to begin with).

    I think this is due to two things:
    One is hype. Hard is better. All good players go for hard tensions, if you yield a racket with a hard tension, you send the message "I'm good".
    The other reason is self-deception. Coming mostly from the sounds of the strings/racket, when hitting it dead center. We know that a hard strung racket sounds better when hit with a crisp shot. And that will trick people into feeling that the shot is harder and/or more precise. By generating the same sound as the pro's (or something more close to it anyway), you think you're hitting the shuttle better. Even though you don't get more speed! Then if you hit 40% of your shots bang on with a hard tensioned racket, you remember those hits, instead of maybe getting 60% good shots from a lesser tensioned string, that doesn't ring a bell or sound like thunder when you hit it. People would often opt for the few good shots, rather than the more consistent but less convincing sounding shots, telling themselves that they "can manage" this tension.

    It's their problem really. I'll just have an easier time beating them. But I don't understand why it has come to this for so many players. In badminton people don't seek advice from a coach or pro on equipment as they do in golf. Maybe that's the reason.

    PS: I used to play at a high level, and I was also a paid coach myself 20 years ago. So I can still move the shuttle decent around the court. I play only feathers, and my comments are only aimed at feather players (I think for plastic you should go even less tension). I'm currently playing bg-80 string, so that's my reference.
    Well said. Big thumbs up from me. Salute! That should sums up why people keep asking me : your shots sounds dull, but why you can still make a nice clear out of it? 23 x 25lbs with durakill 66.

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